How did you pay for college?

  1. I think that I may be accepted into a private university for the fall. My grades are decent but not great so my chances of getting into a public college are slim to none.

    This school is quite expensive 30,000 a year plus living expenses since I will leaving my job to attend school full time. I will be getting a pt job to supplement my income.

    Has anybody taken out 2 loans per school year? If so, how did you do it? I am nervous since I know that I will be approved for one but unsure about 2. Can this be even done? Taking 2 separate loans out per school year - I have tapped out my federal aid/loan limits so I will be taking the private loan route this time.

    I finally got the courage to apply and now I may not be able to attend for financial reasons. Any advise would be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks!
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    About nurse2btracy

    Joined: Oct '03; Posts: 382; Likes: 19
    library clerk...for now

    14 Comments

  3. by   kimmie518
    I have both federal and private loans to help myself through school. It wasn't hard to get a private loan. I was also lucky enough to get a *perfect* part time job for any spending money (I work 3 weekends a month, 6 hours each day, I get to do school which is a big help, and I get paid pretty well).

    $30k is A LOT. How many years will you be going there? If you're going to a 4 year university and its $30k a year, you need to think about how you're going to pay that back when you're done- that's a pretty big payment even if you are a RN.
  4. by   TheCommuter
    I financed my $20,000 tuition with a Sallie Mae private student loan.

    www.SallieMae.com
  5. by   PeachPie
    I'm about to start harvesting some kidneys... not my own, of course. Hehe.
  6. by   Seven, RN2b
    Should it be fairly easy to get a loan for living expenses if you aren't employed - but, have good credit and a solid work history prior?
  7. by   Mommy TeleRN
    I would first off find out a few things:

    1)Can you apply for academic fresh start? I don't know a lot about it but know some at my community college that got fresh start.

    2) What are the nursing program admission criteria in your area? Some are not even based on GPA. Can you just get your ADN for now?

    3) Can you really apply yourself to some gen ed classes to get your GPA up?

    4) If your ONLY route is through this very expensive university - can you at least take your gen ed someplace WAY cheaper?

    5) Talk to the uni and see what fin aid is available. Often they have lots of resources and can get your tuition wayyyyy knocked down.

    But do look into ALL options besides taking out massive student loans. I went to a community college that has a large nursing program, excellent pass rates, a high quality program, they recently got a large grant and have really upgraded resources in the program etc... all for about $1200 a semester which was completely covered for me by Pell grants.

    Research research research!
  8. by   Mommy TeleRN
    RMB - I have not taken out private loans but it is my understanding they want you to have a source of income either you or a spouse or cosigner. I would apply BEFORE quitting my job.
  9. by   TrudyRN
    I was fortunate in that my parents got loans and a couple of grants. It cost me $2000 to become a diploma RN. I paid off the loans with my first job. I worked 2 shifts per week as a unit clerk then as an undergraduate (aide) to have spending money and get experience while I was a student.

    My employer then paid for some of my BSN completion expense. I then "repaid" the employer with 2 years of service.

    I wonder if you can find a less expensive school. Can you live with your family to cut costs? Not buy textbooks or, at least, get used ones? Don't eat out, work a little, get used clothing, and otherwise try to be very frugal. I do wish you well and admire your determination. Have you tried to get scholarships? That's how I financed all but $1500 of my MSN.
  10. by   nurse2btracy
    Thanks for the info.

    This school is a 4 year university but I have taken most of my liberal arts courses at another school that does not offer a degree in nursing. I should be there 2 years and maybe a summer session.

    Once I get accepted I will be making a visit to the financial aid office to see what type of aid/scholarships I would qualify for.
  11. by   Niiccoollaa
    If I were you I would try to get a job at a hospital. My current employer will pay up to $3,000 a year for tuition for full time employees and $1500 for part-time. I know that barely puts a dent in a $30,000 a year tuition payment but evey little bit helps- plus I 'm sure it won't hurt working at a hospital that you could continue working at when you graduate. Also check with your schools financial aid office. I know a lot of pirvate schools offer more money in need- based scholarships than 4 yr universities. Good luck!!!
  12. by   Kanani_Ikike
    Quote from nurse2btracy
    I think that I may be accepted into a private university for the fall. My grades are decent but not great so my chances of getting into a public college are slim to none.

    This school is quite expensive 30,000 a year plus living expenses since I will leaving my job to attend school full time. I will be getting a pt job to supplement my income.

    Has anybody taken out 2 loans per school year? If so, how did you do it? I am nervous since I know that I will be approved for one but unsure about 2. Can this be even done? Taking 2 separate loans out per school year - I have tapped out my federal aid/loan limits so I will be taking the private loan route this time.

    I finally got the courage to apply and now I may not be able to attend for financial reasons. Any advise would be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks!
    Well, after I was considered an independent student, I was allowed to start all over on my loan amount limit. I think I went from like a limit of $20,000 to $46,000. That allowed me to pay for what my grants wouldn't pay for and buy books and pay lab fees, computer fees, books (which could easily run you about $700 if you can't get a used book). And, on the weekends, I had a part time job in a gentelmen's club over in Atlanta, GA. The pay was exceptional and it was good hours for a student. But, now, everyone doesn't go that route nor do they need to. May women wouldn't go this route, but you know, that's mainly what kept me taken care of while in school. Especially with how hard it is to get a job with a nursing student's hours of availability. But that's just me, it was there so I did it to make ends meet.

    I'm not glorifying it or anything, but that's exactly how I paid for school. But there are things like work-study, NA jobs at hospitals, private sitter jobs, etc..... Best wishes. I'm sure you're make it.
  13. by   Midwest4me
    My undergraduate program (B.S. in Psychology) was paid for by BEOG(now known as the Pell grant I think) and SEOG (Suplemental Educational Opportunity Grant) from 1978-81. My master's study was paid for my federal loans. Nursing school was paid for by federal loans and by 2 part-time jobs. (I attended out of state and in exchange for waiving the out of state tuition, I worked as a concessions manager for the college's basketball team. The other job was a "work study job". )I'm unsure if colleges still have opportunities like this but you might look into it. Good luck!
  14. by   USAstudent
    Just an FYI about private student loans-My husband took out about $12000 of these when he was right out of high school and not thinking about having to pay them back. The interest rates on most of them were variable, which means now they're 8.5-9.2% (compared to 5% with his federally backed loans) and they cannot be consolidated with his federal loans. This means more payments. The monthly payment for his federal consolidated loans (about $27,000) is $130/month. The monthly payment for his private loans is $150/month (and will increase when intrest rates increase). And you're talking about taking out at least twice that amount....just be carefull. Nursing is a great field and you will always have a job, but we don't make that much money.

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