Hating Nursing Currently

  1. I graduated, wrote my NCLEX, and got a job on the floor I consolidated on. I just finished training and I'm on my own. I feel so overwhelmed and close to tears each shift. I love helping others but I get so stressed with how much I don't know and running around with my head cut off the whole shift. I'm not sure what to do or if this is normal, it's making me a miserable even when I'm not working and I dread going in. I'm currently working on a medicine floor. Anyone have an advice or suggestions? Is this a normal feeling? Thanks!
    •  
  2. Visit vanaly profile page

    About vanaly

    Joined: Aug '17; Posts: 5; Likes: 6

    35 Comments

  3. by   Crush
    Breathe. This is normal. It gets better. I like the phrase my instructor in nursing school used at graduation, "Now the real learning begins." You got this. As you continue, you will learn tricks and time management, etc that will help your shifts go better. Once you have some experience, you can always test out other units/areas of interest if you still dread coming in to work. Sending good vibes your way.
  4. by   VivaLasViejas
    Welcome to your first year of nursing! Almost every nurse you'll ever meet here on AN or in real life will tell you they absolutely HATED their first year. Crying before (and after) shifts? Check. Stressing over every little detail? Yup. Freaking out at even the smallest of mistakes? Ohhh, yeah.

    All I can say is, this WILL pass. It will take at least a year, and probably two, before you feel somewhat comfortable in nursing, but time goes by fast and you'll be learning so much. Hang in there, ask questions, observe, and just absorb every experience you can get. One day before you know it, you'll not only be able to do your job but actually be *good* at it. You can count on it.
  5. by   Purple_roses
    This is exactly how I felt as well. I would say that it was about 6 months before I started to feel ok about coming into work. The first year is difficult, but just remember that you are learning and becoming a stronger nurse with each shift. And once your year is up, if you still don't like the floor you're on, you'll have a relatively easy time securing a position in a field of nursing you would rather be in.
  6. by   Purple_roses
    Quote from VivaLasViejas
    Welcome to your first year of nursing! Almost every nurse you'll ever meet here on AN or in real life will tell you they absolutely HATED their first year. Crying before (and after) shifts? Check. Stressing over every little detail? Yup. Freaking out at even the smallest of mistakes? Ohhh, yeah.

    All I can say is, this WILL pass. It will take at least a year, and probably two, before you feel somewhat comfortable in nursing, but time goes by fast and you'll be learning so much. Hang in there, ask questions, observe, and just absorb every experience you can get. One day before you know it, you'll not only be able to do your job but actually be *good* at it. You can count on it.
    "Crying before (and after)"....and sometimes sneaking into the bathroom to cry *during* the shift.
  7. by   Geslina
    I feel your pain. I've been a nurse for 5 years, and I still have nights where I lock myself in the bathroom and cry. I have never been good under stress, and I find nursing to be the most stressful job I've ever had. It's not so much the general work, or even the constantly being understaffed - it's all the ridiculously redundant charting, which takes up so much time. Add that to the pressure to finish before your shift is up, because your employer doesn't want to pay OT, and it just makes me angry. A lot of time doing charting and other paperwork that could be spent with patients. Seems the state and their love of forcing all this paperwork has sucked all the joy out of nursing.
  8. by   Crush
    Quote from Purple_roses
    "Crying before (and after)"....and sometimes sneaking into the bathroom to cry *during* the shift.
    Oh gosh, here too once. I was just so overwhelmed with my patient load and my team was also busy so I did not ask for help.

    Sometimes it takes more than a year, sometimes it is that whole first year and some it takes less time. Point is, your feelings are normal.
  9. by   missmollie
    Nursing school does a disservice by not being honest about the purpose of school. School is just a big test prep for the NCLEX, and as one nurse here stated, the real learning begins on the floor. I have no desire to ever repeat that first year again. Just stick with it. Before you know it, people will be coming to you to ask you questions they have, and you'll be a strong nurse on your floor. It will just take time.
  10. by   elkpark
    Quote from missmollie
    Nursing school does a disservice by not being honest about the purpose of school. School is just a big test prep for the NCLEX, and as one nurse here stated, the real learning begins on the floor.
    Unfortunately, this is a relatively (by historical standards) new phenomenon in nursing. Even as recently as a few decades ago, people were still learning what they needed to know to function as nurses in nursing school, and were well-prepared to enter practice when they graduated, although the first year of practice was still a difficult and painful transition. Nursing schools also used to make clear to students what to expect of their first year of practice -- it was impressed upon my classmates and me throughout our education that the first year of practice was going to be stressful and difficult, we would be miserable, but, if we hunkered down and made it through that first year, things would get better as we went. Nowadays, schools do a poor job of preparing new graduates and fail to warn them of what to expect when they start practicing. No wonder new grads are so frustrated and miserable.
  11. by   RNperdiem
    In addition to all the good advice of the previous posters, put all of your self-care and coping methods to work.
    My first year had me writing in my journal. Just getting my feelings on paper helped me sort things out.
    Take care of yourself. Make good nutrition, enough sleep, sunshine, exercise, supportive people and other things that build you up a priority.
    Nursing, especially in the first year, can deplete you fast, so take care of your needs so you can take care of others.
  12. by   ruby_jane
    Quote from elkpark
    Unfortunately, this is a relatively (by historical standards) new phenomenon in nursing. Even as recently as a few decades ago, people were still learning what they needed to know to function as nurses in nursing school, and were well-prepared to enter practice when they graduated, although the first year of practice was still a difficult and painful transition. Nursing schools also used to make clear to students what to expect of their first year of practice -- it was impressed upon my classmates and me throughout our education that the first year of practice was going to be stressful and difficult, we would be miserable, but, if we hunkered down and made it through that first year, things would get better as we went. Nowadays, schools do a poor job of preparing new graduates and fail to warn them of what to expect when they start practicing. No wonder new grads are so frustrated and miserable.
    Elk Park, thank you for this. I have often compared my entry to nursing to Mr. Ruby Jane's (he graduated with an ADN 20 years ago). He just seemed more confident and competent. Maybe it's his personality, or maybe what you say is true.

    Vanaly- new nurses are super task-oriented. Eventually the tasks will become easier and you will start to see the bigger picture, and maybe anticipate tasks that need to be done. Hang in there. You're on a busy floor. It will get better.
  13. by   Buckeye.nurse
    There has been some great advice given so far! I just have a few 2 cents to add.

    DO learn who you can ask for advice/support (besides your co-workers). A few resources which come to mind are respiratory therapists, pharmacists, physical/occupational/speech therapists, wound-ostomy nurses, chaplains, and social workers. They are invaluable team members who can help you care for your patients.

    DO try to schedule yourself for success. Try to avoid working 3 twelve hour shifts in a row the first year, and definitely avoid 4 shifts in a row if you can. Unless you absolutely have to, also try to limit your overtime.

    DO make a conscious effort to learn something every day. You may not notice it now, but in a year you will be shocked at how much more you know, and how much more confident you feel. That first year, I would keep a small notepad and jot down questions I had...then look them up on a credible website at home.

    DON'T obsess about work at home other than looking a few things up though. Find a hobby with the free time you have now that you aren't in school! Cardio exercise is great for working out tension. After really stressful shifts, I'll get on my bike and pound out a ride. Endorphins are amazing hormones. Get a regular massage (trust me, it's well worth the money).

    You've got this. Hang in there!
  14. by   AnnieNP
    I was terrified my first year as a nurse. When I started my first job (a long time ago) one of the nurses in charge of hospital orientation told our group to consider the first year on the job as our last year of school!!! I kept an index card in my pocket and every shift I would write down things that I needed to read about before going back to work. It was my own homework assignment. It really did help me. Take a deep breath and know you are not alone.

close