Giving notice.

  1. [FONT=Franklin Gothic Medium]Hello everyone!
    [FONT=Franklin Gothic Medium]
    [FONT=Franklin Gothic Medium]I am coming up on my 1-year anniversary as a nurse. I've learned so much and have been extremely fortunate that I was nurtured and taught at my first job.
    [FONT=Franklin Gothic Medium]
    [FONT=Franklin Gothic Medium]I interviewed for another position at a different facility last week. Much to my surprise, I was hired! It is a position that I've always wanted to do. I am very excited.
    [FONT=Franklin Gothic Medium]
    [FONT=Franklin Gothic Medium]How exactly do you give notice? I'm going to try to work it out that I can give 3-4 weeks. Do I type up a professional letter? A part of me feels awful about leaving a great place. But, I am put on call way too much. I worked 12 out of 36 hours last week. I just cannot afford to do this any longer.
    [FONT=Franklin Gothic Medium]
    [FONT=Franklin Gothic Medium]Thanks for any input.
    [FONT=Franklin Gothic Medium]
    [FONT=Franklin Gothic Medium]
  2. Visit Eirene profile page

    About Eirene

    Joined: Nov '06; Posts: 541; Likes: 387
    Inactive nurse while in recovery.; from US

    10 Comments

  3. by   caliotter3
    Type a professional letter and keep a copy of it for yourself. Give the exact last day of work so that there is no confusion and opportunity to accuse you of no call, no show at the end. Employers have been known to fire people because they were "scheduled" and didn't come to work.
  4. by   Higgs
    'Dear XXXX

    I am writing to hand in my resignation from the post of XXXX with immediate effect. I am hereby giving a month's notice (in my experience a years employ means about a month's notice) from the date of this letter and my last day at work will be XXXX.

    I have enjoyed immensely my time at XXXX and have been made welcome and felt very much part of the team. I wish you all well in the future.

    Yours,


    XXXX'

    ...something like that has done me well many, many times.

    Congrats!
    Last edit by Higgs on Jun 20, '09 : Reason: typo
  5. by   oslogirl
    Dear so and so,

    I wish to submit my resignation from such and such effective ........ Thank you very much for the opportunity to work with you.

    Sincerely, ,,,,,,
  6. by   shodobe
    Everywhere I have ever worked 2 weeks in sufficient, not a month. Of course your employeer wants to hang onto as long as they can because now they have to advertise to replace you. If you like where you work now they might try to do everything they can to hold onto you. All the mangers I have ever known want at least the 2 weeks. Does your facility have an exit interview? If so, this is a time to voice concerns, good or bad, to your manger. Never, ever burn your bridges! Never say anything that might come back to haunt you, because it generally does. Good luck!
  7. by   subee
    Quote from Eirene
    [FONT=Franklin Gothic Medium]Hello everyone!
    [FONT=Franklin Gothic Medium]
    [FONT=Franklin Gothic Medium]I am coming up on my 1-year anniversary as a nurse. I've learned so much and have been extremely fortunate that I was nurtured and taught at my first job.
    [FONT=Franklin Gothic Medium]
    [FONT=Franklin Gothic Medium]I interviewed for another position at a different facility last week. Much to my surprise, I was hired! It is a position that I've always wanted to do. I am very excited.
    [FONT=Franklin Gothic Medium]
    [FONT=Franklin Gothic Medium]How exactly do you give notice? I'm going to try to work it out that I can give 3-4 weeks. Do I type up a professional letter? A part of me feels awful about leaving a great place. But, I am put on call way too much. I worked 12 out of 36 hours last week. I just cannot afford to do this any longer.
    [FONT=Franklin Gothic Medium]
    [FONT=Franklin Gothic Medium]Thanks for any input.
    [FONT=Franklin Gothic Medium]
    [FONT=Franklin Gothic Medium]
    Notice time = vacation time alloted in the year you are resigning
  8. by   I love my cat!
    Two weeks is plenty of notice, IMO.
    Please correct me if I am wrong, but I always thought that in a State with at-will employement...providing x-amount of days-weeks notice prior to quitting is not require by law. This applies to an employee quitting and/or an employee being fired.
    I was always under the impression that providing weeks notice was more of a courtesy on behalf of the employee, esp. if one is wanting a reference or recommendation.

    I could be totally wrong about this though.
  9. by   dusky1228
    the amount of notice may not be law in each state, but may be governed by facility policy. for each of the many positions i have had to give notice for, the amount of notice required by facility policy was equal to the amount of vacation one was allowed for that year.
    that being said......i also feel like 2 weeks should be sufficient.
  10. by   caliotter3
    Quote from I love my cat!
    Two weeks is plenty of notice, IMO.
    Please correct me if I am wrong, but I always thought that in a State with at-will employement...providing x-amount of days-weeks notice prior to quitting is not require by law. This applies to an employee quitting and/or an employee being fired.
    I was always under the impression that providing weeks notice was more of a courtesy on behalf of the employee, esp. if one is wanting a reference or recommendation.

    I could be totally wrong about this though.
    This is what I found out. I had mistakenly believed that it was still two weeks.
  11. by   AllSmiles225
    When I started my job they told me 2 weeks for CNAs and 4 weeks for nurses. I mean technically I don't think they can mandate that, but I doubt I would get a good reference if I quit and only gave 2 weeks.
  12. by   levisandtees
    The facility I work for expects one month notice ("professional courtesy") per P&P and "reserves the right to hold any accrued PTO and provide negative feedback with future job references if employees do not comply with policy". Of course now management is suspicious anytime we use a chunk of PTO...

close