Giving last name in report

  1. In school, I was taught to chart the first initial, last name, and license of the nurse receiving Pt care.
    This was explained that if the chart was called into court and I gave report to Brittany RN Anywhereville, Hospital, that there may be multiple people of this name at the same date and time report was given.
    This has been my norm for report, and I have only recently ran into opposition. While giving report I, as usual, requested the nurses name for posterity. It's been a favorite of mine since the princess bride. The nurse, in no uncertain, terms reported "I'm not obligated to give my last name." I paused, then gave my last name and gave report. So I noted first name, hospital, and unit.

    My question,

    What is your opinion on giving last names for report?

    I have heard the concern of the nurse on the other side being a "creep" and stalking the nurse. So safety I understand. Just want second opinions on my own understanding.
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    About DaveICURN

    Joined: Oct '17; Posts: 50; Likes: 77

    81 Comments

  3. by   Sour Lemon
    Quote from DaveICURN
    In school, I was taught to chart the first initial, last name, and license of the nurse receiving Pt care.
    This was explained that if the chart was called into court and I gave report to Brittany RN Anywhereville, Hospital, that there may be multiple people of this name at the same date and time report was given.
    This has been my norm for report, and I have only recently ran into opposition. While giving report I, as usual, requested the nurses name for posterity. It's been a favorite of mine since the princess bride. The nurse, in no uncertain, terms reported "I'm not obligated to give my last name." I paused, then gave my last name and gave report. So I noted first name, hospital, and unit.

    My question,

    What is your opinion on giving last names for report?

    I have heard the concern of the nurse on the other side being a "creep" and stalking the nurse. So safety I understand. Just want second opinions on my own understanding.
    It seems a little paranoid to worry about giving any part of your name to another nurse, but I don't see multiple nurses named Brittany at "Anywhere Hospital" being an issue either. That hospital's own documentation would quickly reveal which Brittney cared for and transferred the patient.
  4. by   psu_213
    Quote from Sour Lemon
    It seems a little paranoid to worry about giving any part of your name to another nurse, but I don't see multiple nurses named Brittany at "Anywhere Hospital" being an issue either. That hospital's own documentation would quickly reveal which Brittney cared for and transferred the patient.
    To me, it seems more likely that Brittney would say "I got report from Mike, RN at Memorial Hospital, but he never told me XYZ information in report, and that is what lead to this negative outcome." Should we also have to chart every piece of information that was passed on in report? IMHO, no...this is overkill, just like making sure a last name is charted is overkill.

    FWIW, I think it is pretty silly if another nurse asks for your name and you label them a "creep."
  5. by   SC_RNDude
    Quote from Sour Lemon
    It seems a little paranoid to worry about giving any part of your name to another nurse...
    I agree. By the same token, it's a bit paranoid to worry about having the full name of the nurse on the off chance the issue is pertinent in the unlikely event you are called into court.
  6. by   CharleeFoxtrot
    Quote from SC_RNDude
    I agree. By the same token, it's a bit paranoid to worry about having the full name of the nurse on the off chance the issue is pertinent in the unlikely event you are called into court.
    Mebbe in the way back days before electronic charting the last name of the person you reported off to and noting it on the chart probably was prudent. But now the EHR notes everything charted give or noted under the nurse's name so it feels a bit redundant.
  7. by   DaveICURN
    Thanks all. These views somewhat mirror my own thoughts on the subject. More like than not ill continue to ask for the first initial and last name, though omitted when requested.
  8. by   mrsboots87
    In our electronic charting we have to know first and last name for handoff charting. However, all I have to do is check the last assessment or output or whatever charted by the last nurse, and their name will be there for me to copy and search.

    but we ask for each other's last names anyway to make it easier. No one seems to care where I'm at.
  9. by   MunoRN
    In general I would recommend against redundant charting. There's not really any reason to say if you gave report and who you gave it to, that only puts your charting at risk for omissions or conflicting information which can then be targeted in court.
  10. by   DaveICURN
    Quote from MunoRN
    In general I would recommend against redundant charting. There's not really any reason to say if you gave report and who you gave it to, that only puts your charting at risk for omissions or conflicting information which can then be targeted in court.
    I understand the need for limiting redundancy. But my typical hand-off goes, "Report given to DaveICURN, Pt resting in bed, care relieved."
    For my own knowledge, is there another way or better way for hand-off?
  11. by   LovingLife123
    Why do you need the name at all? People chart way too much sometimes, in my opinion. You can get in just as much trouble if you overchart as you do if you underchart. The system states who cared for you patient before and after you. Each nurse should be doing their own head to toe assessment when receiving a new admit.

    When it comes down to it, no matter what you charted you passed off to the new nurse can easily be disputed.
  12. by   MunoRN
    Quote from DaveICURN
    I understand the need for limiting redundancy. But my typical hand-off goes, "Report given to DaveICURN, Pt resting in bed, care relieved."
    For my own knowledge, is there another way or better way for hand-off?
    Handoff is part of the standard of care, and you only need to chart in detail that you're following the standard of care if you set that precedent. If as a general rule you specifically chart that you gave report to someone then that one time when you don't chart it can be easily argued that you didn't give report at all. Otherwise the burden would be on the opposing counsel to prove you didn't give report.
  13. by   bugya90
    We use Epic and part of the flowsheet is who you gave to report to/who you received report from and what time. I only chart first name and title "Sally, RN" and the approximate time. There are nurses who just chart "oncoming shift" but I don't think they are supposed to be doing that.
  14. by   KelRN215
    I never asked for the last name of the accepting nurse when transferring a patient either to rehab or another facility. Never was asked for my name when accepting a transfer, either.

    I am occasionally asked for my last name in my current role and I provide it when asked. My last name is included in my email address so often that's why I'm giving it. I don't ask for clinic RN's last names when I'm calling about one of my patients or anything though.

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