Gender Pay Gap in Nursing: Changes in 2017 Salary Survey vs. 2015? - page 3

In 2015 The Journal of American Medicine released a study on the pay gap between male and female nurses. That survey revealed that male nurses earn about $5100 per year more than women. This survey... Read More

  1. by   Feelgood RN
    Quote from Secretperson

    I really hope you are just being sarcastic here...this would be a fast track to a human resource nightmare because it is the most blatant sexist EEO case that could possibly exist.
    While the post shows traditional gender roles in a workplace environment it is not sexist. He is not getting paid more BECAUSE HE'S A MAN. He gets paid more because his job duties entail more dangerous work than the other staff. If there were a 6'1" 320lb woman that does the same job opposite shift they would assumably get the same compensation as the poster, for doing the same job.

    A male desk cop does not get the same pay as a female street cop. They are both police. One's job is more dangerous and is compensated rightly so.

    If there were a female at his job that wanted to do the work he does, and qualifies for it, and they turn her down or pay her less due to her gender then THAT IS sexist. As it stands you're all hot and bothered over simple traditional roles.

    Seriously, if you take the emotion out of this and look at numbers and reasons there are easy ways to account for disparities. Here is simply one job is more dangerous and is compensated for such.
  2. by   azhiker96
    Quote from tnbutterfly
    The graphs are interactive. You can select various filters including location, years of experience, gender, specialty,degree, etc.

    We have separate graphs for hourly pay and salary pay. You will be able to compare average hourly pay for all hourly paid respondents, full and part time. Annual pay comparisons uses data from only full time respondents and it is based on the amount of income reported to the IRS.
    Are the graphs available? I have not been able to find them. Thanks.
  3. by   Secretperson
    Quote from Feelgood RN
    While the post shows traditional gender roles in a workplace environment it is not sexist. He is not getting paid more BECAUSE HE'S A MAN. He gets paid more because his job duties entail more dangerous work than the other staff. If there were a 6'1" 320lb woman that does the same job opposite shift they would assumably get the same compensation as the poster, for doing the same job.
    I would agree with you if the nurse is hired specifically as a nurse and bouncer, but with almost two decades of healthcare under my belt and as a hiring authority...I have never seen this practice, however, if you are correct good for him

    I can promise you that if a more qualified licensed professional was boxed out of the RN position because of a "size" requirement a good HR would destroy this units hiring process.
  4. by   tnbutterfly
    Quote from azhiker96
    Are the graphs available? I have not been able to find them. Thanks.
    Yes, the complete results including interactive graphs are posted now in these 2 articles:

    2017 allnurses Salary Survey Results Part 1: Demographics and Compensation

    30% of Nurses Leaving the Workforce - 2017 Salary Survey Results Part 2
  5. by   StarrActress
    I have a lot to say about this is feel its extremely unfair for them to say women "like" to take time off. The role of a women is very difficult and the belief that we just willy-nilly take time off is just false. First off finding child care can be an extremely difficult task! It took me years to find a solution that didn't choke the life outta my wallet. Women are expected by society as a whole to be homemakers and caregivers of their families before they are anything else and we are considered bad moms if we dare for one second take our eyes off our child(ren).

    If men and women were both expected to take time off due to family needs then the playing field would be not only more fair but more easy on all the players involved. If it wasn't for my nanny I couldn't support my family. I pay a good bit for it. I pay and my employer pays for a Back up Care program LBC's Child Care benefits program which has helped me so much I recommend it to everyone I know. It saved my sanity. (luxurybabyconcierge.com if anyone is curious I swear by their service honestly couldnt have made it thru college or my Res w/o it.)
  6. by   Flatline
    Quote from StarrActress
    I have a lot to say about this is feel its extremely unfair for them to say women "like" to take time off. The role of a women is very difficult and the belief that we just willy-nilly take time off is just false. First off finding child care can be an extremely difficult task! It took me years to find a solution that didn't choke the life outta my wallet. Women are expected by society as a whole to be homemakers and caregivers of their families before they are anything else and we are considered bad moms if we dare for one second take our eyes off our child(ren).

    If men and women were both expected to take time off due to family needs then the playing field would be not only more fair but more easy on all the players involved. If it wasn't for my nanny I couldn't support my family. I pay a good bit for it. I pay and my employer pays for a Back up Care program LBC's Child Care benefits program which has helped me so much I recommend it to everyone I know. It saved my sanity. (luxurybabyconcierge.com if anyone is curious I swear by their service honestly couldnt have made it thru college or my Res w/o it.)

    I know many young couples where the male stays home with the child, in fact I lobbied for that for a long time but my wife told me that if anyone was staying home, it was her. I believe the joke is with the younger couples that no one gets to stay at home anymore due to financial constraints.

    I cannot understand what you are saying. Are you blaming social pressures for you taking time off of work thus stunting your career? Why didn't your significant other just stay home? Why didn't you just get a nanny like you do now?

    Where do you live where the social pressures are that high? Hell, everywhere I have traveled in the U.S. the financial pressures keep people anyone from staying home.
  7. by   NurseSpeedy
    There are companies nowadays that make it equal. When I was hired I got my number from a grid. Number of years experienced, maxed out by a certain number of years and that was my pay. I knew this before I even interviewed with one facility. Interviewed with another facility owned by same company the next day. In less than thirty minutes I had two offer letters from different recruiters with the same exact hourly rate.

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