Forced resignation?

  1. Hello all,

    All advice and perspectives are welcome and appreciated. I am fresh out of nursing school and just completed my "New Grad Residency Program" internship, however I am being provided the option to resign due to "time management" (I constantly need overtime to complete all of my tasks). What should I do? Thank you in advance.
  2. Visit ThatBear profile page

    About ThatBear

    Joined: Sep '18; Posts: 4

    22 Comments

  3. by   silverbat
    Are they willing to give you extra days of orientation? Or let you go to a less busy unit? If not, resignation is better than being fired. O
  4. by   beekee
    You do realize that if you don't resign you will be fired, right? It's time to start looking for another job.
  5. by   ThatBear
    They gave me one extra week for the personal reasons I had going on, but not enough improvement. They denied my request for transfer to a less acute unit because "it is against policy". I am looking for a new job now, but am uncertain what to look for. I am very thorough, but slower than I'd like. What type of work should I look I to and how should I explain my recent failure to future employers?
  6. by   ThatBear
    Any other takers?
  7. by   sallyrnrrt
    Home health, PACU
  8. by   SaltineQueen
    Well, if you don't resign you'll be let go. So I'd resign.

    What kind of unit were you on & what was your patient load?
  9. by   iluvivt
    You need to resign and then take a very hard look at what the problem was... then tell us so we can advice you.There are some awesome nurses here who can help you. You may have picked a unit that is too fast paced, had a preceptor that can't or will not help you or an inpatient employer.It takes time for new RNs to get in the groove.It's so unfair to do this to new RNs but it is the reality out there.For many employers they want fast and efficient employees and they are unwilling to allow you enough training time.
  10. by   ThatBear
    I will resign. Inpatient neurology and I was expected to handle 6 patients immediately. I made no errors, had no complaints, but I constantly have to stay hours late catching up on charting because I never seem to have time during my shift. I am definitely slower than I'd like, but I will only get better in time (if I can find another job). What type of nursing should I look into now and how should I explain my recent failure to future employers?
  11. by   hppygr8ful
    Quote from ThatBear
    I will resign. Inpatient neurology and I was expected to handle 6 patients immediately. I made no errors, had no complaints, but I constantly have to stay hours late catching up on charting because I never seem to have time during my shift. I am definitely slower than I'd like, but I will only get better in time (if I can find another job). What type of nursing should I look into now and how should I explain my recent failure to future employers?
    If you don't challenge yourself you will never get faster. I have always found that charting as you go through-out the day. In Psych nurses routinely chart n 16 to 18 patients in an 8 hour shift.


    Figure out what's holding you up, fix it and go.


    Hppygr8ful
  12. by   Rebekulous
    Neuro patients have a lot going on, and learning time management is always hard at the beginning. I would recommend asking the nurses you work with what they do to help get all their charting done.

    I'm in the "chart as you go" camp. I was always behind in my charting until I started charting in the room. At the beginning, when I was still getting used to the EMR, I would chart the "exceptions" on my assessment. Then when I got time to sit down, I knew everything else was "WDL". We also had to chart when we rounded. It takes a few seconds to log in in the room, and it saves me having to remember it later. Plus, when you are in the room you will get fewer interruptions than if you try and sit down at the nurses' station, and if there is something you forgot to check, you are still there to take a quick look. I also found that it resulted in less in-and-out in the rooms. As I got faster at knowing where things needed to be charted, I just charted everything in the room when I did it. Then, when I was done giving report, I was really DONE.
  13. by   Kallie3006
    I can't believe that on a neurology floor you are expected to take 6 patients right off the bat as a brand new nurse. A new nurse is expected to have qualms for just about every aspect and expectation of the job in itself. If this is actually the case, it sounds like they have unrealistic expectations of new grads and you are being set up for failure, IMO. I would be more concerned with a new grad flying through everything than one that is slower, developing skills, prioritizing, time management etc. Not only are you learning how to be a nurse you are learning an environment, charting, expectations, Dr's preferences etc. 6 patients straight out of the gate... in one

    Someone said PACU- my opinion but PACU is not a place for a new grad, its a faced paced critical environment the utilizes autonomy and critical thinking, that of which a new grad has not had the time nor experience to successfully succeed.

    How long have you been on the unit?
  14. by   CharleeFoxtrot
    Quote from Kallie3006
    ...Someone said PACU- my opinion but PACU is not a place for a new grad, its a faced paced critical environment the utilizes autonomy and critical thinking, that of which a new grad has not had the time nor experience to successfully succeed.
    That same poster also recommended home health care which is also not a place for the new grad for many of the same reasons.

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