For Sale: Used Nurse. Dirt Cheap! - page 6

I'm not sure if it's because I was a good deal older than many of my classmates when I graduated from nursing school and found out very quickly that I was nowhere near as smart as I thought I was, or... Read More

  1. by   VivaLasViejas
    I know what you mean about PTSD. I can't even bring myself to set foot in that last toxic building I left, even though my hubby still works there and I was quite fond of some of the residents. I don't even want to be on the property---when I have to pick him up, I have him wait at the little mom-and-pop market next door, or literally zoom through and pick him up at the edge of the parking lot without ever shifting out of DRIVE.

    Now how pathetic is THAT? And I'm sorry, but I have little faith in labor unions, and even less in their ability to fend off multibillion-dollar corporations and make them responsive to US instead of the other way around. But that is a story for a whole 'nother thread, methinks.
  2. by   CseMgr1
    Me, neither, Marla.

    As a matter of fact, I packed up a couple of blood pressure cuffs, a stethoscope, my badge and mailed them to my former employer today....after completing my initial claim for unemployment benefits.

    I have NO use for them, other than ensuring that they submit my separation notice so I can receive unemployment benefits.

    They started this mess and they can FINISH it.
  3. by   quezen
    Do you notice that there do not see to be any 'guy' voices in this discussion!
    (Maybe I am wrong, I just didn't pick up on it)
    To a certain extent we nurses have to face up to the fact that Nursing, and Health Care, in the US today, is big, big business. And in fact, with economic events lately, one of the few really BIG businesses left standing.

    'Careing, self sacrifice' words like this belong to the Middle Ages view of the religious orders taking in the plague infested pilgrim.

    I am playing 'devils advocate' just a bit here, but be realistic, you gals.

    GUY's have played these hard knuckled business games with each other for a long, long time.
    That saying 'it's just business' did originate out of the dog eat dog business world, and that kind of world now exists at the management levels of health care.
    Remember when you have to walk away (or when you are getting the 'boot',) to take that really, really deep breath and, if you cannot respond in a civil way at that moment-then DON'T SAY ANYTHING. But do ask for a chance to respond after you have gotten yourself together a bit.
    Remain civil-later on that will be what most differeniates you from THOSE people.

    GUY'S, working in construction jobs, in the military, in the factory, for example, know that they have to 'watch their backs'.
    They KNOW how to 'rig' some apparatus or other so that it lasts through THEIR shift, and the NEXT shift has to deal with it.
    (And come on you experienced nurses out there, you know a few tricks to get the dying patient to last a few more hours so that the NEXT shift does the post mortum care, and all the death paperwork, not you-and the CNA's know which RN's they can depend on to help them out in situtations like this, by using a few 'tricks of the trade'!)

    In the GUY world stuff like this is normal.
    Look at those pictures you see all the time of trial lawyers tearing each other apart in the the court room, and a few hours later all are having lunch together.
    Also normal in the GUY world is to tell each other to their face what they think of each other, without an uncontroled scene ensusing.

    Just think how 'two faced' we are trained to be in the nursing world. 'On the poor patient, somone must be the advocate for the patient'. Well maybe this very patient treated people much worse that you have ever been treated during THEIR working years. But we nurses allow ourselves to get in the middle of manipulative games played by true experts!
    Come on be honest, even simple minded drug addicts have learned how to play one shift against the other-some nurses STILL fall for this, because of ego, I guess, or because they are playing a game themselves.
    Thank goodness for 'Standards of Care'.
    It does help, I have learned, to stand in front of a mirror and practice saying 'NO', in ways that sound like honey. If the bottom line is still 'NO', but you are so used to saying it in a sugar coated way, it will buy you time, and when others do it to you, you may even get a good laugh.

    I am not saying that there arn't an awfull lot of 'dirt bags' in upper management in the Health Care field, I am just saying that when so much money is concentrated in a field, what in the world do you expect!
    Change, if there is to be change, will come via a change in the Health Care System in the US (see thread Socialized Medicine-the myths and the Facts, I know some of you post on that thread.)

    Even when\if we get that holy event 'Change', there will still be plenty of problems and plenty of stuff that doesn't suit people (that's why I re-uped my 'Premium Membership', this site will STILL give us a place to howl and scream about the LATEST version of 'we don't like how we have been treated'-and I know 'allnurses' needs money to operate just like any enity.))

    Then we have to ask ourselves-do we Really want to work 'Dirt Cheap'. I did plenty of 'dirt cheap' jobs in my younger years.

    Maybe we should talk real $$ amounts. I disclosed personal information about my finances in a previous post because that is what 'rock bottom' looked like for me. I took a PRN job at $15.00 an hour in an LTC and I was happy to have that job, while I licked my wounds from the beating I had taken in my personnal 'sob story' life. I got my confidence back and went back to more complex nursing, and the Army called me back up and that $$ saved my a...s, but still, I would take less money if I could work a job I liked.
    I don't need to prove anything anymore. I just want a little income, and a nice place to work PRN.
    Good management is a VERY important part of making a place a nice place to work.
    But I think polls consistently show this don't they-that nurses would take job satisfaction over $$??
  4. by   nursemarion
    True, most nurses I know would take a little less pay for a better work environment. Basic economics shows us that it is why most jobs that suck pay so much better- no one can endure them. Good jobs often have lower pay because they are easier to fill.

    You make some good points about a man's world, but nursing is a woman's world. We are still a majority. We are not men and should not have to suck it up and try to be men. We are wired differently. I have seen men just as devastated by job loss- look at workplace shooters. They are normally men, not women. They are just as angry and do not necessarily bounce back any better. They just hide their rage, go home and beat the wife, wreck the car, have road rage, or shoot someone. We cry. Which is better?
  5. by   MaritesaRN
    Quote from quezen
    Do you notice that there do not see to be any 'guy' voices in this discussion!
    (Maybe I am wrong, I just didn't pick up on it)
    To a certain extent we nurses have to face up to the fact that Nursing, and Health Care, in the US today, is big, big business. And in fact, with economic events lately, one of the few really BIG businesses left standing.

    'Careing, self sacrifice' words like this belong to the Middle Ages view of the religious orders taking in the plague infested pilgrim.

    I am playing 'devils advocate' just a bit here, but be realistic, you gals.

    GUY's have played these hard knuckled business games with each other for a long, long time.
    That saying 'it's just business' did originate out of the dog eat dog business world, and that kind of world now exists at the management levels of health care.
    Remember when you have to walk away (or when you are getting the 'boot',) to take that really, really deep breath and, if you cannot respond in a civil way at that moment-then DON'T SAY ANYTHING. But do ask for a chance to respond after you have gotten yourself together a bit.
    Remain civil-later on that will be what most differeniates you from THOSE people.

    GUY'S, working in construction jobs, in the military, in the factory, for example, know that they have to 'watch their backs'.
    They KNOW how to 'rig' some apparatus or other so that it lasts through THEIR shift, and the NEXT shift has to deal with it.
    (And come on you experienced nurses out there, you know a few tricks to get the dying patient to last a few more hours so that the NEXT shift does the post mortum care, and all the death paperwork, not you-and the CNA's know which RN's they can depend on to help them out in situtations like this, by using a few 'tricks of the trade'!)

    In the GUY world stuff like this is normal.
    Look at those pictures you see all the time of trial lawyers tearing each other apart in the the court room, and a few hours later all are having lunch together.
    Also normal in the GUY world is to tell each other to their face what they think of each other, without an uncontroled scene ensusing.

    Just think how 'two faced' we are trained to be in the nursing world. 'On the poor patient, somone must be the advocate for the patient'. Well maybe this very patient treated people much worse that you have ever been treated during THEIR working years. But we nurses allow ourselves to get in the middle of manipulative games played by true experts!
    Come on be honest, even simple minded drug addicts have learned how to play one shift against the other-some nurses STILL fall for this, because of ego, I guess, or because they are playing a game themselves.
    Thank goodness for 'Standards of Care'.
    It does help, I have learned, to stand in front of a mirror and practice saying 'NO', in ways that sound like honey. If the bottom line is still 'NO', but you are so used to saying it in a sugar coated way, it will buy you time, and when others do it to you, you may even get a good laugh.

    I am not saying that there arn't an awfull lot of 'dirt bags' in upper management in the Health Care field, I am just saying that when so much money is concentrated in a field, what in the world do you expect!
    Change, if there is to be change, will come via a change in the Health Care System in the US (see thread Socialized Medicine-the myths and the Facts, I know some of you post on that thread.)

    Even when\if we get that holy event 'Change', there will still be plenty of problems and plenty of stuff that doesn't suit people (that's why I re-uped my 'Premium Membership', this site will STILL give us a place to howl and scream about the LATEST version of 'we don't like how we have been treated'-and I know 'allnurses' needs money to operate just like any enity.))

    Then we have to ask ourselves-do we Really want to work 'Dirt Cheap'. I did plenty of 'dirt cheap' jobs in my younger years.

    Maybe we should talk real $$ amounts. I disclosed personal information about my finances in a previous post because that is what 'rock bottom' looked like for me. I took a PRN job at $15.00 an hour in an LTC and I was happy to have that job, while I licked my wounds from the beating I had taken in my personnal 'sob story' life. I got my confidence back and went back to more complex nursing, and the Army called me back up and that $$ saved my a...s, but still, I would take less money if I could work a job I liked.
    I don't need to prove anything anymore. I just want a little income, and a nice place to work PRN.
    Good management is a VERY important part of making a place a nice place to work.
    But I think polls consistently show this don't they-that nurses would take job satisfaction over $$??

    I like the way you think...I can identify to it so closely. Unfortunately due to economy concerns , some nurses would go for more $$$ , than a nice place to work. It is hard to "sacrifice" a high paying job, for a nice place to work. The latter being very scarce . It is sad that some nurses would have to "prostitute" themselves to this high paying but miserable jobs. But it is a very personal choice , and also a sensitive financial scapegoat.
    I worked and lasted 3 weeks in a high paying case manager position in a profit hospital. Needless to say the type of hospital says it all! The concerns were how to move patient fast and out , and if you can not move them fast enough , the case manager supervisor "nags " , but does not do anything to see what the real problem is. If a good system is in place , nothing is impossible . The place was chaotic and very fragmented....there is really no realistic order ...it was like a circus. Anyway I quit. I made a choice that no place or anybody could pay me, just so they could use me as a scapegoat to their failed system. I did not make myself available for this kind of beating and treatment. I have self respect and I know who I am. so , I went back to my old insurance job ( thank God my boss understood and took me back) and earning a lower salary, but at least I have respect and fair treatment in my old job. It is one's choice to change or stay, and we need to respect those that can not change for reasons of their own.
    Last edit by VivaLasViejas on Jun 5, '09
  6. by   VivaLasViejas
    That's basically what it felt like to work at the facility I described in my OP: prostitution. In fact, just about the only difference is you keep your clothes on.........and turn your conscience OFF.
  7. by   kfett47
    Dear Fellow RN,

    It is fortunate that you had a friend in a high position that would let you get back to the basics. I have been away from bedside nursing for 10 years and I wanted to get back to what I do best...taking care of people. However, I have run into nothing but discrimination and snide remarks. I am being equated to a new graduate which I have 14 years experience as an RN that I have not forgotten and I can pick up the new technology just as good as the next RN even better because I have been in the research field. It is extremely discouraging and I think your situation is rare but I am happy that you were able to break back into nursing.
  8. by   VivaLasViejas
    You would probably be well-advised to take a refresher course if you want to get back into direct care. So much has changed in the past decade that anyone who's been away from the bedside for more than a couple of years really needs re-education---not that your basic nursing skills, like Foley insertions and IV starts, are ever forgotten, but as you well know, theory and best practices are continually changing, and it's hard to keep up even when one is taking care of patients every day.

    Since you've been in research, you'll have the advantage of knowing what goes into nursing practice, but it would be of considerable benefit to you to see how that research translates into the care given at the bedside. Just my two cents' worth.
  9. by   kfett47
    Dear VivaLasViejas,

    I appreciate your two cents and as a matter of fact I have applied to an RN Refresher Course that starts in the Fall. I will see where that leads me. Thank you!
  10. by   VivaLasViejas
    I wish you the best. I know I'm a much better nurse for having a few years of management under my belt, as well as having simply grown older and wiser since my last foray into bedside nursing. No worries..........you'll be fine.
  11. by   MaritesaRN
    Quote from VivaLasViejas
    You would probably be well-advised to take a refresher course if you want to get back into direct care. So much has changed in the past decade that anyone who's been away from the bedside for more than a couple of years really needs re-education---not that your basic nursing skills, like Foley insertions and IV starts, are ever forgotten, but as you well know, theory and best practices are continually changing, and it's hard to keep up even when one is taking care of patients every day.

    Since you've been in research, you'll have the advantage of knowing what goes into nursing practice, but it would be of considerable benefit to you to see how that research translates into the care given at the bedside. Just my two cents' worth.

    Hi Viva, as usual , your advice is priceless. I am the one who is taliking of doing a LTC form medicla review and UR, and also out of clinical practice....do I need also a refresher course? I am not going to work in an acute facility. Also, considering my background in Medicare review, I am thinking of getting the MDS. Where can I find out about the refresher course?
    Thank you again ladies for bringing this subject up.:wink2:
  12. by   VivaLasViejas
    You could check your state Board of Nursing website for approved refresher courses, if you feel that is appropriate. It might not be a bad idea if you've been out of clinical practice for more than a few years, just to get your skills up to date. MDS nurses sometimes have to work the floor (I had to when I was a resident care manager) and if you're on a skilled unit, you'll be dealing with fresh CABG patients only a couple of days out of the hospital, wound vacs, IVs, fresh ostomies, and all sorts of acute-type situations. Besides, education is NEVER wasted. Go for your dreams!!
  13. by   MaritesaRN
    Quote from VivaLasViejas
    You could check your state Board of Nursing website for approved refresher courses, if you feel that is appropriate. It might not be a bad idea if you've been out of clinical practice for more than a few years, just to get your skills up to date. MDS nurses sometimes have to work the floor (I had to when I was a resident care manager) and if you're on a skilled unit, you'll be dealing with fresh CABG patients only a couple of days out of the hospital, wound vacs, IVs, fresh ostomies, and all sorts of acute-type situations. Besides, education is NEVER wasted. Go for your dreams!!

    Thanks Viva, I will add this to my to do list.......I am also in the process of endorsing my California license for Oregon and Washington State............. California is just not our thing anymore . My family ( my daughter and grand daughter) find it too crowded, too commercialized, hot and smoggy and a very bankrupt state that keeps taking money out form the childrens school system----- this is what made me really think seriously of moving, not to mention it is getting quite expensive here also ! Help !!

close