For Sale: Used Nurse. Dirt Cheap! - page 3

I'm not sure if it's because I was a good deal older than many of my classmates when I graduated from nursing school and found out very quickly that I was nowhere near as smart as I thought I was, or... Read More

  1. by   MoriahRoseRN
    Great post. I still consider myself a new older nurse. I so much can connect with you on being ambitious, and was once told in a nice way by a nurse manager, "I am not a go getter". I don't agree with her, because, if it is something I really want, I work hard to get it. For instance, nursing school. I fought and worked hard to get through nursing school, with four young children and an unsupportive spouse.

    Since that time having a family and taking care of them has precedence over my job. I really prefer to be home with them, but due to the economy I have to work right now. My oldest just left home, and now I can see what ppl having been telling me all these years. They will grow up so fast, enjoy them while you can, it is finally hitting home. My life is not my job, but while I am there I am going to give it my best, but I want to leave it where it is when I am not there. I still haven't found my nitch as they call it, but I do know that right now my job is not the center of my life, my God and my family are.
  2. by   VivaLasViejas
    Quote from MoriahRoseRN
    Great post. I still consider myself a new older nurse. I so much can connect with you on being ambitious, and was once told in a nice way by a nurse manager, "I am not a go getter". I don't agree with her, because, if it is something I really want, I work hard to get it.
    I was told the same thing by one administrator. She put it a bit differently---"The administrative end of things is not your strong suit"---and when I left that facility, she told the residents I had resigned because I wanted to "go back" to patient care, as if that were somehow less worthy an aim than being the best supervisor I could be. At the time, I thought she was full of it, and when I took the next job (the high-paying one where I crashed and burned) I did it partly to prove her wrong. But as it turned out, she was spot on, because now I feel like I'm where I was supposed to be all along. Go figure!:wink2:
  3. by   NewTexasRN
    Wow. Thank you so much for that insightful article. It's not easy to basically bare your soul to all of us, but thank you for reminding us that the best things in life can't be bought even if you have a fat pay check. Wow, money truly isn't every thing.
  4. by   VivaLasViejas
    And yanno.........I'm not doing all that bad financially. There's only four of us at home now, and my sister is self-sufficient with her Social Security so she doesn't really 'cost' us anything. Nursing home wages are nowhere near what hospitals pay, but that's another place I wouldn't go back to if they offered me twice my current salary.

    I once figured out what I was really earning when I divided my annual salary by the amount of hours I was actually putting in, and it turned out to be, well, not so good (I think it was around $15-17/hr.) SO not worth all the hassle..........never again will I complain about the hourly wage system!
  5. by   Joe NightingMale
    Good story Marla, I'm glad you got out of there and into something better.

    Patient contact really matters.
  6. by   Fish Feng
    u are such great and brave that worth our proud !
    i will give my best wishes to u , faraway but true friend !
  7. by   HIPPIECHIKRN
    Thank you for your post. It showed me that the path you sometimes choose isn't always the one you should be on. Of course the grass always looks greener on the other side. I recently just turned down an offer to be a Nurse Manager for our unit with higher salaried pay. I had concerns about being oncall 24 /7. The DON and ADON told me with straight faces that they hardly ever got paged. They told me that in the months that they had the beepers it rarely went off. I said no. Their beepers don't go off because they turn them off and their cell phone mailboxes were full. The new nurse manager started and I see her filling in on almost all shifts that are short. Not too much managing. I guess she can't be on call if she's already working.

    Good luck with your future in NURSING!
  8. by   gonzo1
    There is no shame in being a bedside nurse
  9. by   VivaLasViejas
    Quote from gonzo1
    There is no shame in being a bedside nurse
    None at all.

    It's our culture that's got it all wrong. Society tends to look down on people who actually work for a living, while glorifying those who don't really "produce" anything. You know it's true; just compare the earnings of entertainers, athletes, health-insurance company CEOs and so on with those of firefighters, janitors, teachers, factory workers.........and nurses!

    But it's all good......I'm certainly not wondering where my family's next meal is coming from, which is much more than a lot of people can say these days. We are blessed indeed. :heartbeat
  10. by   darrell
    Awesome.

    D
  11. by   LockportRN
    What an articulate and insightful post! You have put into words where I have been unable to...and in such a way as to input this 'stage(?)' of life! I loved it!

    I too, graduated as and 'older' nurse. While my career wasn't as varied as yours, I did go up the ranks. I always thought that the ER or ICU was where I wanted to be. During nursing school clinicals, I was given an elderly Alzheimers patient that was in full leather restraints that I was told to bath. This gentleman hurt me everyday! And my instructor assigned me to him EVERYDAY! Until "I could do it without getting hurt".

    While I eventually learned how to, I vowed that I would NEVER, EVER work in LTC. But like you said "...life is weird sometimes." I was diagnosed with CA and had to take off of work from the Tele unit I was working (my 1rst nursing job) and thought I'd go work at a nursing home to sharpen up my nursing skills for my 'real' job. lol Well, that was 17 years ago and I'm still in LTC. I love it.

    My intention was to stay there, working the Skilled Unit as I love to see people get better and go home. However, eventually there was a lot of pressure to take on more responsibility. Only after watching DON after DON come in, make changes without explaination that didn't always make any sense, leave promptly after 8 hours and never answer pages/phones, did I start to think about 'moving up' into management.

    The final straw came about when yet another position opened up and after I again declined, they choose another nurse that was never a team player and rarely if ever helped anyone else, did I decide to take the position. I thought that I could make a difference for both the residents as well as for staff. I hope that I did, but at what a price!

    I laugh when I think of staff talking about how easy it is in 'an office position'! Hah! A salaried position, working 60 hours on the job with 24 hour/day accountability. Responsible to and for ALL the residents, ALL their families, ALL the nurses, ALL the CNA's, doctors, lab, pharmacy, vendors, education and blah, blah, blah!

    It actually is funny. All I wanted to do was to take what I thought was disfunctional management system and make it better for all concerned. Little did I know about how disfunctional the other systems (M/C, and PA regs, insurances, corporations, economy etc) involved were, nor did I understand the implact that these systems had on our little unit.

    Anyway, 1 promotion, led to 2, 3, 4 and on! I thought I was on the right path. After all, isn't that what nurses in the 80's and 90's did? Get more education? Take on more responsibility? Change the world with our 1 little voice? "Bring home the bacon and fry it up in a pan and never ever let you forget that you're a man?" :lol_hitti

    This 80's mantra was so enmeshed in my brain that 17 years later, I am currently not working (as much as I HATE to say this, burnt out). I look at the years that I lost with my children. I wonder, did I positively impact anyone? Where any lasting changes made for a single person? (other than I my children and myself?) I think about what I want to do now and why did I get into nursing in the first place. While looking for work (admittedly halfheartedly although if I don't do something very soon I will loose my house) I am repeatedly pigeon-holed right back into management. sigh! At the same time, it's been a minute or so since I've passed meds and the CA I had was in my eye and the vision isn't good enough to start an IV, which has me nervous.

    Something I miss is holding that hand; teaching; giving the medications, suctioning, applying O2 to get the persons breathing under control even if the whole time the patient is nasty and mean to you, because in the end, when you have changed the dressings and bathed them and their bed to remove the evidence of their struggle, you look at each other knowing what they just escaped and you were blessed enough to help them. And you hope if you ever need this that someone will be there for you too.

    What I DON'T miss are the phone calls, 10 minutes after you have left the building or the ones that come just as you are ready to go to sleep after working for 12 hours to tell you that the night nurse just called off, or the phone calls in the middle of the night that not only wake up your whold house, but that keep you awake in your 'menopausal state'! I don't miss having the master key, answering to administrators, assistant administrators, CEO's, corporations, IDPH and families everytime there is an error made by a nurse or a CNA that did not follow the policy. The scheduler that puts 'ghost' names on the schedule leaving the facility 'short' and all the oncoming staff mad at you. Having to cut staff because of the 'budget' which was always small to begin with and then looking at the exhausted faces of your nurses and cna's and the angry faces of the families and docs.

    Wow, I am going on but I have to give you my most heartfelt thanks. I just now as I typed that last sentence, made my decision!!!!!! I guess, I choose life! Being in management is not that for me anymore, well at least not for now.

    Thank you! If you decide that Hospice or the bedside is not for you, you should really consider writing as you do it soooo well! Good luck to you!
  12. by   VivaLasViejas
    Quote from LockportRN
    What an articulate and insightful post! You have put into words where I have been unable to...and in such a way as to input this 'stage(?)' of life! I loved it!

    I too, graduated as and 'older' nurse. While my career wasn't as varied as yours, I did go up the ranks. I always thought that the ER or ICU was where I wanted to be. During nursing school clinicals, I was given an elderly Alzheimers patient that was in full leather restraints that I was told to bath. This gentleman hurt me everyday! And my instructor assigned me to him EVERYDAY! Until "I could do it without getting hurt".

    While I eventually learned how to, I vowed that I would NEVER, EVER work in LTC. But like you said "...life is weird sometimes." I was diagnosed with CA and had to take off of work from the Tele unit I was working (my 1rst nursing job) and thought I'd go work at a nursing home to sharpen up my nursing skills for my 'real' job. lol Well, that was 17 years ago and I'm still in LTC. I love it.

    My intention was to stay there, working the Skilled Unit as I love to see people get better and go home. However, eventually there was a lot of pressure to take on more responsibility. Only after watching DON after DON come in, make changes without explaination that didn't always make any sense, leave promptly after 8 hours and never answer pages/phones, did I start to think about 'moving up' into management.

    The final straw came about when yet another position opened up and after I again declined, they choose another nurse that was never a team player and rarely if ever helped anyone else, did I decide to take the position. I thought that I could make a difference for both the residents as well as for staff. I hope that I did, but at what a price!

    I laugh when I think of staff talking about how easy it is in 'an office position'! Hah! A salaried position, working 60 hours on the job with 24 hour/day accountability. Responsible to and for ALL the residents, ALL their families, ALL the nurses, ALL the CNA's, doctors, lab, pharmacy, vendors, education and blah, blah, blah!

    It actually is funny. All I wanted to do was to take what I thought was disfunctional management system and make it better for all concerned. Little did I know about how disfunctional the other systems (M/C, and PA regs, insurances, corporations, economy etc) involved were, nor did I understand the implact that these systems had on our little unit.

    Anyway, 1 promotion, led to 2, 3, 4 and on! I thought I was on the right path. After all, isn't that what nurses in the 80's and 90's did? Get more education? Take on more responsibility? Change the world with our 1 little voice? "Bring home the bacon and fry it up in a pan and never ever let you forget that you're a man?" :lol_hitti

    This 80's mantra was so enmeshed in my brain that 17 years later, I am currently not working (as much as I HATE to say this, burnt out). I look at the years that I lost with my children. I wonder, did I positively impact anyone? Where any lasting changes made for a single person? (other than I my children and myself?) I think about what I want to do now and why did I get into nursing in the first place. While looking for work (admittedly halfheartedly although if I don't do something very soon I will loose my house) I am repeatedly pigeon-holed right back into management. sigh! At the same time, it's been a minute or so since I've passed meds and the CA I had was in my eye and the vision isn't good enough to start an IV, which has me nervous.

    Something I miss is holding that hand; teaching; giving the medications, suctioning, applying O2 to get the persons breathing under control even if the whole time the patient is nasty and mean to you, because in the end, when you have changed the dressings and bathed them and their bed to remove the evidence of their struggle, you look at each other knowing what they just escaped and you were blessed enough to help them. And you hope if you ever need this that someone will be there for you too.

    What I DON'T miss are the phone calls, 10 minutes after you have left the building or the ones that come just as you are ready to go to sleep after working for 12 hours to tell you that the night nurse just called off, or the phone calls in the middle of the night that not only wake up your whold house, but that keep you awake in your 'menopausal state'! I don't miss having the master key, answering to administrators, assistant administrators, CEO's, corporations, IDPH and families everytime there is an error made by a nurse or a CNA that did not follow the policy. The scheduler that puts 'ghost' names on the schedule leaving the facility 'short' and all the oncoming staff mad at you. Having to cut staff because of the 'budget' which was always small to begin with and then looking at the exhausted faces of your nurses and cna's and the angry faces of the families and docs.

    Wow, I am going on but I have to give you my most heartfelt thanks. I just now as I typed that last sentence, made my decision!!!!!! I guess, I choose life! Being in management is not that for me anymore, well at least not for now.

    Thank you! If you decide that Hospice or the bedside is not for you, you should really consider writing as you do it soooo well! Good luck to you!
    Ummmmm.............you actually have articulated your sentiments rather well, I'd say. Ever think about a writing career yourself?

    What a wonderful post---you have totally made my day!! Thank you!
  13. by   nursemarion
    HUGS!!! to you. I also thought that I needed to move up, and up, and up. Only I discovered that it cost me my sanity. So here I am with an MBA after 24 years of nursing and gradual advancement, suddenly working instead as a school nurse! But hey, that is the one thing that is magical about nursing, you can easily reinvent yourself. I have done acute care, long-term, home health, hospice, teaching, management, and now school nursing. The joy that I feel about helping people is still there after all the years, no matter what setting I am in. Sometimes I have been terrified and felt like I was not smart enough, other times I felt confident like I could handle anything. I have had good days and bad, but I have always done my best for my patients, and that is all anyone can hope for.

    BTW, hospice nursing is great, I only left it because of having a baby which made taking call very difficult. I still miss it. I bet you'd be great at it. I may still go back to it yet, heck I still have at least 20 years to work!

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