Favorite clinical instructor....and why?

  1. My favorite clinical instructor turned out to be the one I feared "getting", because she was known as tough. She expected preparation, and it turns out that is the key to success! Be prepared for anything, because "anything" is what will happen. She was known as the "battle ax", and went strictly by the book, just like following the policy&procedures all are expected to follow on the floor. Great habits for all of us to gain! She pushed us out of our 'comfort zone', and seemed to have a feel for what each of us feared doing...and make us do it! This worked well for me, but not for all us in her section. I found it very motivating.

    Who was your favorite...and why?
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    About ceecel.dee

    Joined: Apr '02; Posts: 968; Likes: 41
    Nurse Educator: love those students!
    Specialty: Med/Surg,ER,L&D,ICU,OR,nrs. educator

    17 Comments

  3. by   Halinja
    My very first clinical instructor was the hard one, the one who NEVER gave an A. Well, she really didn't, but I learned just loads from her. Others who had an easier ride didn't learn much at all from clinical. She questioned, she pushed, she shoved me way out of my comfort zone, but she never made me feel stupid.

    Plus...she instilled some great work habits. The care plans don't scare me, I've done 'em the way she wanted them so often that its second nature now.

    She left to another school...and it was a great loss to our program.

    Editing to throw this in...ALL of my clinical instructors have been great, each one for a different reason, I've been so lucky!
    Last edit by Halinja on Oct 18, '06
  4. by   AfloydRN
    My favorit was an RN who worked ER longer than I have been alive. On the first day of clinicals told us- I'll teach you what they say I need to... then I'll show you what really happens. Perception and reality are very different.
  5. by   TheCommuter
    I didn't have any favorite clinical instructors. They were, in my honest opinion, a bunch of incompetent idiots.

    I'll take that back - there was a male Russian immigrant RN who was a good instructor and a great clinician. He explained things in easily understandable terms and was wonderful.
  6. by   mariedoreen
    Quote from TheCommuter
    I didn't have any favorite clinical instructors. They were, in my honest opinion, a bunch of incompetent idiots.

    I'll take that back - there was a male Russian immigrant RN who was a good instructor and a great clinician. He explained things in easily understandable terms and was wonderful.
    LOL!

    I'd tell you about mine but I'm actively working to repress all memories of nursing school.
  7. by   moongirl
    If and when I ever get one, I will let you know.
  8. by   TheCommuter
    Quote from moongirl
    If and when I ever get one, I will let you know.
    I hear that!!!
    :roll :chuckle
  9. by   TazziRN
    I had two: one was my instructor for my very first and my last rotations, and she also pinned me at graduation. She is one of the sharpest nurses I have ever known. Another one I had for several different medsurg rotations...tough but fair with a great sense of humor!!
  10. by   CVnurse08
    I see a common thread here....I am in my first semester so I just have had my one clinical instructor and yes she is the one nobody wants and is known to be loud, harsh, and strict. But I love her!!! I have learned so much and learned to do it the right way every time. She also has taught us so much about professionalism which I know will benefit me in the long run. I guess this just shows there are goods/bads to every instructor!
  11. by   jill48
    Quote from TheCommuter
    I hear that!!!
    :roll :chuckle
    You guys are funny.
  12. by   jill48
    When I was in school, we were doing clinicals on a med/surg floor in a hospital. I was supposed to administer my first IM injection. I pulled up the medicine fine, cleansed the site ok, and told the patient, "Ok, now you are going to feel a little stick." I then proceeded to pull my hand back and "almost" complete the stick several times; even saying to the patient, "OK, sorry about that, NOW you are going to feel a little stick." Same thing, just couldn't bring myself to stick her. My instructor gently took the syringe from me and gave the injection. We went out into the hall where I was sure I was going to get a severe thrashing and probably sent home. I was in tears before we even made it out the door; not the big, overexagerated tears, but the quiet little sniffles that you can't stop. My teacher said, "What happened in there?" I said, "I just couldn't stick her." She said, "Why not?" I said, "I didn't want to hurt her." She said, "You are going to hurt her more the slower you go. You have to tell her it's coming and then quickly stick her. It hurts less the quicker it goes." Then for the rest of the day whenever any other student had a stick, but had already done one, she would come get me and I would do it. I did SQ's, ID's, IM's, and even a Z-track. A Z-track!!!!!! How often do you get a chance to do a Z-track?! Anyway, now I tell a patient they are about to get an injection and I do it so quickly that they don't even feel it, they say, "When are you going to do it?" I already did! Thank God for that instructor. I think of her with every injection I give.:kiss :angel2:
  13. by   TiffyRN
    I hated my nursing school. I have trauma from it and I graduated almost 14 years ago. My husband doesn't even let me get started on it because I get mean and never know when to hush about those people.

    Having said that there were 2 outstanding instructors I had (out of about 12). One was my first med-surg instructor. She was very matter of fact and practical; actually taught skills and technique. The second was my Peds instructor. She had a real calm authority and really asked me to stretch my abilities. I loved her rotation even though I didn't really care for Peds; I think that says a lot. These two by the way were the only two instructors I had that were currently practising as RN's at the same time (like a couple shifts a month) and I think that made all the difference in the world.

    Just to give you an impression of what I good or bad instructor can do. I was so impressed by my Peds instructor I did my 2nd week of practicum in Peds just to have the chance to work with her a few more hours. As far as negative influence. I was wanting to be an L&D nurse until I did my L&D rotation. My instructor was such a nut (don't mean that in any nice way) that she cured me of ever wanting to see a perinatal patient ever again in my life.
  14. by   CseMgr1
    To this day, my favorite clinical instructor was one in which I had when I went through my LPN training at a local technical school...years before I got my RN. She was singulary responsible for teaching me how to do ratio and proportion (I never learned how in high school) and saved me from being kicked out of the program, when I caught the flu during an epidemic and missed a lot of clinicals. She was just one of those rare individuals who was a born teacher, not to mention a darn good nurse and human being.

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