Dropping the "Nurse Card"? - page 4

I am very curious if any of you ever dropped the "Nurse" word to get you out of trouble? Myself and a couple of buddies are new recently hired nurses and we call each other on our way home after... Read More

  1. by   Buckeye.nurse
    My story actually has nothing to do with driving or police/troopers. But I did pull the "nurse card"!

    One of the classes required to complete my RN to BSN was a literature elective. I (naively) thought that "Intro to Fiction" sounded like an easy check to put in the box. Unfortunately, the professor was a published author with an ego to match. Also, he only offered 100 points *TOTAL* for the entire semester, and offered up the points in a very stingy manner.

    On the first assigned paper, I received a grade of 21/25 points. I had a cumulative 4.0 up to that point, and was convinced (and very angry) that this elective was going to ruin my final GPA. So I e-mailed the professor, and politely asked if we could meet to discuss feedback on my paper, and what I could do differently on the final 3 papers. I planned the meeting to occur before a shift, and went dressed in scrubs with my RN badge in place.

    After reading over my paper several times he said (and I quote), "I'm not sure why I gave you that grade. I must have been drunk when I read it." He then upped my grade to a 23/25. I'm not sure if the scrubs made any difference, but I ended up squeaking out of that class with a 93.5, and graduated with a 4.0....phew!!
  2. by   Kooky Korky
    What helps avoid tickets is:
    being white
    being female
    being older
    being young and beautiful/handsome
    being courteous
    being calm
    not being threatening
    being a nurse, EMT, firefighter, other first responder.

    If you do get a ticket, call the officer who gave it to you
    the next day, thank him for helping you realize you were speeding,
    and very politely mention that you're a nurse. "Say, if you're ever over at West Valley Hospital, I'm a nurse in the ER. Stop by and say "hello". "We love us some cops over there and we have the best coffee in town". Or something akin to that.

    This approach worked for a Sheriff's Deputy when he was ticketed by a Statie. The Statie agreed to not show up in court, so the case was tossed.

    Life is unfair. Sometimes we have to use the advantages we
    happen to have.
    Last edit by Kooky Korky on Jun 11
  3. by   Kooky Korky
    Quote from Medic_Murse
    Yeah, VA troopers are like honey badgers...they don't give a F who you are. You could be the Queen of England and they would ticket you, just for being the Queen of England. They had a notorious reputation with county/city Fire/PD's and hospital workers.
    Naturally the Queen would be very gracious about the encounter and then not have to pay the ticket. Mayors, governors, president, and all that, you know. On the off-chance that she did have to pay it, it would mean nothing to her - she's a multi-billionaress. She owns jewels galore, numerous castles throughtout her realm, and even the actual earth itself in England, Scotland, Wales, Ireland to name but a few.
    Allodial title. You and I think we own our homes and the ground upon which they sit. Well just try not paying the taxes and you will quickly learn who really owns your humble abode. Eminent domain. It can all be taken away from you in the blink of an eye and they don't even have to give you enough money to buy another place without having to get a mortgage.
    Better to be the Queen.
    Last edit by Kooky Korky on Jun 11
  4. by   WAboundSN
    Lots of posts on here, so I did not go through all of them; however, I have been a police officer for 8 years and am an ABSN student. I'm skeptical when people drop what they do right off the bat. Mainly because a number of these people usually lie. It's not uncommon for me to pull up the BRN/BoN website and run your name to actually see if you are who you say you are, and that goes for nurses, doctors, lawyers, etc. I've found a number of things over the years...people being truthful, people completely lying, people who have suspended nursing/bar/medicine licenses, etc. That being said, I try to give people the benefit of the doubt, especially nurses, physicians, and other fire, law enforcement, or healthcare workers, because we all lean on each other pretty heavily for support. Attitude is also huge. I don't care if you work for our local ER, the neighboring PD, etc., if you're a prick, I have no problem giving you a ticket. If you're respectful, chances are you'll get a warning. Thats a good rule of thumb no matter who you are. Attitude almost always means a ticket.
  5. by   WAboundSN
    Quote from Kooky Korky
    What helps avoid tickets is:
    being white
    being female
    being older
    being young and beautiful/handsome
    being courteous
    being calm
    not being threatening
    being a nurse, EMT, firefighter, other first responder.

    If you do get a ticket, call the officer who gave it to you
    the next day, thank him for helping you realize you were speeding,
    and very politely mention that you're a nurse. "Say, if you're ever over at West Valley Hospital, I'm a nurse in the ER. Stop by and say "hello". "We love us some cops over there and we have the best coffee in town". Or something akin to that.

    This approach worked for a Sheriff's Deputy when he was ticketed by a Statie. The Statie agreed to not show up in court, so the case was tossed.

    Life is unfair. Sometimes we have to use the advantages we
    happen to have.
    Um, yeah this is almost completely inaccurate. Courteous, calm, non-threatening, sure most cops are more likely to give you a warning if you act like that instead of being an argumentative jerk. Race, gender, religion, attractiveness, etc., play no factor on whether who gets a ticket. Also, yes most places will dismiss a citation if the officer does not show up; however, officers are subpoenaed to court, thus unless the officer has prior approval from his agency or the court, not showing up is considered contempt of court, in which the officer can get into trouble, up to being arrested. So I would not rely on the officer not showing up to court.
  6. by   WAboundSN
    Quote from Imanut
    Funny ? Not...It was your buddy who answered the phone. Cop should be disciplined for unequal treatment under law. Not at all amusing RNjay...RN is not a pass for being unsafe and breaking any law.
    It's not unequal treatment it's called discretion.
    Last edit by WAboundSN on Jun 12
  7. by   LikeTheDeadSea
    I was married to a cop - his cop friends would say "what kind of nurse are you?" at parties, and when I'd go into the various bits of Public/Community Health I've done, they'd laugh and say, "Yeah, we have no chance of running into you, so no get-out-of-ticket favors." Basically ER/ICU/trauma nurses got "respect" from them because if they got on-duty injury, that's who they'd see. Any other type of nurse was chop liver in their eyes.


    *I am referring only this specific group, not all LEO in general. I definitely don't generalize based on my ex and his peers..
  8. by   PiperLambie
    Nothing so exciting as an RN, but in my previous life I was a manager for one of the big two delivery companies (lots of purple and orange), and was running a wee bit behind one morning, decked out in my glorious work uniform. Cop pulls me over, looks at my attire, and says "what do you do for xxxx". "I am an operations manager." "Well go ahead and get on to operating, I don't want any trouble with my Amazon packages making it to my house."

    No complaints from me.
  9. by   DrNalepa
    I was speeding home from the grocery and did not want my ice cream to melt and IBS to hit in. I was pulled over and when the officer asked for the registration papers I opened the box and pulled out the paper. Handed it to him. After a short while he came back and gave me a warning to slow down and go on home. i Found out later I had handed him the work sheet from the Chevrolet garage. I bet he got a kick out of that one and I was totally unaware of what I had done.
  10. by   kakamegamama
    Thank you for your service. Stay safe out there & the best to you in your future career as a nurse!
  11. by   EricJRN
    It's so weird... I was stopped tonight (for having a brake light out) after seeing this thread just this week. Strangely, the officer said that my insurance was also coming up as expired, but I just now verified that I have current coverage and no outstanding balance. At any rate, he gave me verbal warnings for the light and the insurance. I did not identify myself as a nurse, but I was wearing scrubs. Did that help? We'll never know.
  12. by   GrumpyRN
    Quote from Kooky Korky
    Naturally the Queen would be very gracious about the encounter and then not have to pay the ticket. Mayors, governors, president, and all that, you know. On the off-chance that she did have to pay it, it would mean nothing to her - she's a multi-billionaress. She owns jewels galore, numerous castles throughtout her realm, and even the actual earth itself in England, Scotland, Wales, Ireland to name but a few.
    Allodial title. You and I think we own our homes and the ground upon which they sit. Well just try not paying the taxes and you will quickly learn who really owns your humble abode. Eminent domain. It can all be taken away from you in the blink of an eye and they don't even have to give you enough money to buy another place without having to get a mortgage.
    Better to be the Queen.
    What????

    Sorry, this makes no sense.
  13. by   akulahawkRN
    I don't use the "I'm a Nurse" or "I'm a Paramedic" card. Ever. I never ask for any kind of "special consideration" or anything like that. To me, anybody that does that is basically demanding a "get out of jail" favor from someone that has a lot of discretion and can sour any future relationship between services. In any event, it's just poor form, as the good Captain Hook would say. I know of people that have gotten out of speeding tickets because they were still in uniform and in one case, I know of a guy that got out of a carpool lane violation while going home from work. He was still in uniform and probably had his brain on autopilot and got in the carpool lane and forgot he wasn't driving the ambulance. I heard about it the next day when he started his shift. I wouldn't have had his luck...

    I have gotten out of a ticket probably because I was in my scrubs going to work a long way from home and possibly because I was armed. For that commute, I almost always carried because of the hours of commute and the distance involved where there was little to no law enforcement presence. Yes, I have a valid license to carry. The Officer that stopped me did exercise discretion on his own. I was ready (and expecting) to sign for the ticket, got a warning instead.

    Most cops are decent people. Motor cops and Troopers are a bit different as they do more traffic stuff than anything else and they seem to really like writing tickets. I used to work pretty closely with a few Sheriff Deputies and I still run into some of them every now and then. Just don't be a jerk (even if you're "asserting your rights" and they'll be decent with you. I've never known anybody that pulled a jerk attitude with a cop that didn't seem to always attract tickets...

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