Double gloving: A good idea just got easier to implement

Sponsor Promoted Content by Ansell
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    There’s a long list of reasons why many nurses don’t double glove prior to a procedure or invasive examination. Yet most healthcare practitioners and safety leaders agree that double gloving is an effective practice. It’s time to put an end to this conundrum.

    Double gloving: A good idea just got easier to implement

    Not enough time, poor feel, poor fit, discomfort, and loss of agility are often cited as reasons nurses choose not to double glove. Yet most of us agree that double gloving is an effective practice in protecting against exposure to blood and bodily fluid transmission in the OR and/or ER.

    The issue is similar to the American public's resistance to wearing seat belts. Most everyone agrees that seat belts save lives and reduce the severity of injuries. And today, approximately 90 percent of the population regularly use them, according the National Highway Safety Administration. But any nurse who has treated an automobile accident victim that wasn't wearing a seatbelt can tell you that number is still too low.

    However, it's much better than the 15 percent of the population that used seat belts back in 1984. Mandatory use is one reason for the increase, but making these safety devices more comfortable and easier to use, plus public education about the benefits, has certainly helped. Another, more obvious reason for adaptation is the pinging noise one hears if one's seat belt isn't fastened.

    Consider this article your "ping" regarding double gloving. It's a fact: studies indicate that double gloving reduces the risk of inner glove perforations by 71 percent over only single gloving.

    Yes, it's tough to break old habits, but facts are facts. Personal protective equipment (PPE), properly used, provides the safeguards for which it is intended - keeping the worker and patient safe. It's time for double gloving to be a necessary practice, not only a convenience.

    However, we also must take double gloving a step further. Simply donning two gloves doesn't completely address all safety risks. Accidents can still happen, and many existing glove options are not optimal for healthcare risks. A tear in an outer glove might not be seen if both gloves are the same color. That raises the risk of fluid exposure. In a busy OR environment, a nurse may not realize that one layer of protection is gone until it's too late. How can we make double gloving both easier to implement and effective?

    PPE innovations are the answer to developing a double gloving system that provides the best protection possible. What if a pre-donned glove-in-glove system that uses proven, existing non-latex glove technology were available? Simply unwrap, one don, and you're done, eliminating the lag in donning time.

    What if the outer and inner gloves were also pre-aligned at the fingertips? That would address comfort, agility and dexterity concerns.

    And what if the outer and inner gloves come in different colors - say, a semi-transparent outer glove and a green inner glove? That would allow any tears to the outer glove to be readily visible.

    And what if there is no "what if?" What if these types of gloves innovations were available today? The technology exists and is now commercially available. Would that change your mind about double gloving?

    Innovations in glove formulation and packaging are also making double gloving more user and environmentally friendly. New gloves feature non-latex diphenylguanidine-free (DGP-free) and cetylpryidinium chloride-free (CPC) construction, eliminating the risk of Type I latex allergies and minimizing chemical Type IV allergies and skin sensitivities. Furthermore, new double gloving solutions that come pre-donned also allow two gloves to be packaged in one inner-wrap and one poly-pouch, reducing packaging by 50 percent and eliminating waste that would go into a landfill.

    Double gloving is certainly not a new concept by any stretch. But stretching the thinking behind double gloving just made it a lot easier to do it the next time you need to don.

    Edited by allnurses to add:

    For information about the GAMMEX PI Glove-in-Glove System, go to the overview in the allnurses Product Directory.
    Last edit by tnbutterfly on Jul 9

  2. Visit Ansell profile page

    About Ansell

    Writer Joe Kubicek is the president of the Healthcare Global Business Unit at Ansell, a global leader in protection solutions. Ansell offers a variety of healthcare and double gloving solutions, including the new GAMMEX® PI Glove-in-Glove™ System, which offers pre-donned and aligned outer and inner gloves for doubling gloving in half the time. For more information, visit ansell.com/gloveinglove.

    This is a sponsored article brought to you by allnurses.com in conjunction with the advertiser. The views expressed in this article are those of the advertiser and do not necessarily reflect allnurses.com, its parent company, or its staff.

    19 Comments so far...

  3. by   Adelinna
    So a double glove is just a thicker stronger glove?
    Or am I confused!?
  4. by   meanmaryjean
    Source for your claim that 'most healthcare practitioners and safety experts agree that double gloving is an effective practice' please?
  5. by   oceangirl1234
    I like to use gloves with warm water if someone has bad veins before I insert an IV. Always surprising how many gloves have a hole...
  6. by   hherrn
    "Sponsored article" is a great term I just learned, so thank you for that. I did have to read it a couple of times to realize what it meant.

    I can certainly understand why, from the authors perspective, that "It's time for double gloving to be a necessary practice, not only a convenience."

    But, as a nurse, I need a little more information before I make decisions. Also, around here, a lot of us like to see evidence to back up claims. As somebody actually trying to sell something, you have an even more substantial burden to back up your claim with evidence. Increased double gloving might be be an evidence based practice, and your product might be a safe, efficient, cost effective way to implement that practice.

    "It's a fact: studies indicate that double gloving reduces the risk of inner glove perforations by 71 percent over only single gloving." Great. Helpful if you show the links. Bonus points for studies not sponsored by glove manufacturers.

    Also, assuming that is true- how does that affect me?

    I have a product proven to reduce your chance of being hit by a meteorite by 71%. Even for my low price of $2.99 a month, you will probably save the money, and take your chances. Though Gerrit Blank might disagree with you.

    On the other hand, a product that can reduce your chance of colon cancer by 71% might be pretty appealing.

    So, what are my risks right now of a negative outcome related to a glove puncture? Considering the type of procedure most nurses don sterile gloves for, what are the real risks and benefits of the change in practice you advocate?
  7. by   hherrn
    Quote from AnnieNP
    A sales pitch?
    Yes.
    Nothing wrong with it, apparently part of the way the site makes money.

    But, given that it is presented as an article, I think it is reasonable for the poster to actually back his claims up, same as any other article on this site.

    "Writer Joe Kubicek is the president of the Healthcare Global Business Unit at Ansell, a global leader in protection solutions. Ansell offers a variety of healthcare and double gloving solutions, including the new GAMMEX® PI Glove-in-Glove™ System, which offers pre-donned and aligned outer and inner gloves for doubling gloving in half the time. For more information, visit ansell.com/gloveinglove.

    This is a sponsored article brought to you by allnurses.com in conjunction with the advertiser. The views expressed in this article are those of the advertiser and do not necessarily reflect allnurses.com, its parent company, or its staff."
  8. by   CharleeFoxtrot
    As a paramedic I learned to double glove on messy scenes, one pair gets gacked up you strip to the second one. As an RN I would still double glove sometimes, usually for wound care or an ostomy change. Putting them on is easy, don't see a need for a handy dandy device or special glove design for everyday use.
  9. by   hherrn
    Quote from CharleeFoxtrot
    As a paramedic I learned to double glove on messy scenes, one pair gets gacked up you strip to the second one. As an RN I would still double glove sometimes, usually for wound care or an ostomy change. Putting them on is easy, don't see a need for a handy dandy device or special glove design for everyday use.
    You are missing the point:

    "PPE innovations are the answer to developing a double gloving system that provides the best protection possible. What if a pre-donned glove-in-glove system that uses proven, existing non-latex glove technology were available? Simply unwrap, one don, and you're done, eliminating the lag in donning time."

    Think of the huge time consuming task it is to put that first pair of gloves on. Why with this system, in the course of a year, you could easily save 5 minutes.
  10. by   Buckeye.nurse
    We routinely wear double gloves when administering chemo, or handling body fluids during the chemo precautions time frame. I've never seen double gloving as part of routine PPE though. Here's a link to the Oncology Nurses Society PPE recommendations.

    https://www.ons.org/practice-resourc...ling-hazardous
  11. by   Ansell
    Quote from Adelinna
    So a double glove is just a thicker stronger glove?
    Or am I confused!?
    Hi Adelinna,

    The GAMMEX PI Glove-In-Glove system offers many benefits. Primarily, it provides dedicated breach detection notification. The two gloves are not combined; they are two individual gloves pre-donned and aligned at the finger tips, making the process of double gloving faster and easier. With the top glove being semi-transparent and the bottom glove being dark green, if the top glove is compromised, the wearer will immediately be able to see this breach and be able to promptly change their gloves. This is in addition to providing a thicker level of barrier protection as you alluded to, providing the protection of two gloves for improved patient and healthcare worker protection.

    For more information, please visit ansell.com/gloveinglove.
  12. by   Ansell
    Quote from meanmaryjean
    Source for your claim that 'most healthcare practitioners and safety experts agree that double gloving is an effective practice' please?
    Many leading healthcare organizations support double gloving as an effective safety precaution, including the Association for periOperative Registered Nurses, the World Health Organization and the International College of Surgeons
  13. by   Fairlisa
    I do not know anything about the new double gloves that are called GAMMEX PI, but state rules and guidelines in most states do not allow double gloving; except under special circumstances. As a bedside nurse, ICU, ER etcetera. You should never double glove unless directed by your immediate supervisor. It would be a policy violation. This is per State and Federal Guidelines. It will cause you to obtain an IJ or some might call it a tag or to be written up. I would only double glove if it was expressed as a policy by your facility on the floor that you work on. I have been doing travel nursing for the last 10 years so I have been in many states and numerous floors and in every orientation I have been told to NEVER double glove for any reason. I am a ER nurse so I deal with getting my gloves dirty very quickly and numerous times a shift. Please check with your facility about the exact policy before you don double gloves. Just an FYI. Thanks.
    Last edit by Fairlisa on Jul 10 : Reason: N/A
  14. by   DisneyNurseGal
    Quote from Ansell
    Many leading healthcare organizations support double gloving as an effective safety precaution, including the Association for periOperative Registered Nurses, the World Health Organization and the International College of Surgeons
    My hospital also supports employees never calling out and no sugary snacks or drinks of any kind ever but that does not mean it is mandated . There is a big difference between those too.

    Two pairs of gloves at all time would greatly impact patient care for the worse. I can't even imagine trying to start an IV with two pairs on let alone have the dexterity to give IV meds. I think hospitals and health care organizations have forgotten, in most situations, that the best line of defense in simple hand washing.

    Of course I have worn two pairs of gloves for messy situations, however, when the mess is cleaned up, I like the take off the top pair and put in the trash so I have a clean pair underneath to finish the job without having to stop and put on another pair.

    I already have to wear two pairs of thicker chemo gloves when I am giving chemo, and I can not even pick up a pen to write. When is it going to end, two pair, three pairs, metal gloves. This product frustrates me so.


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