Don't wanna always give baths, clean up feces, etc., where to work? - page 9

In clinicals we just give baths, clean up poop and puke, and feed patients. I honestly want nothing to do with this once I'm a nurse, so, where/what floors can I work on as a new grad, in order to... Read More

  1. by   Hellllllo Nurse
    Quote from Kylee45
    You do where I live....
    Where is that?

    I have a friend who's been a psych nurse for 20+ years. She's a diploma RN.
  2. by   Hellllllo Nurse
    Quote from Emmanuel Goldstein
    Perhaps you two should go back and re-read the thread title and the initial post. It wasn't just about the "smellier" aspects of nursing:

    "Don't wanna always give baths, clean up feces, etc., where to work?"


    "In clinicals we just give baths, clean up poop and puke, and feed patients. I honestly want nothing to do with this once I'm a nurse..."


    Now go to some threads where students and new grads worry about ever being able to deal with bodily fluids/stool, and read the responses.

    Big difference here.

    And I stand by my first post in this thread. This person is headed into the wrong field if they want "nothing to do" with caring for the basic needs of others.

    Get over it, indeed.
    Exactly- I agree totally.

    Some here have stated that my comments were rude- but I stand by them. I called it like I saw it. I did not say those things to be rude- but to be completely honest and express the impression I got from the OP. I felt she was saying "Tell me how I can be a nurse without really having to be a nurse."
  3. by   Hellllllo Nurse
    Quote from Scrubby
    A lot of these posts are pretty harsh IMHO. I'm a wee bit fed up with older nurses rolling their eyes and muttering about young university trained nurses not being able to deal with the realities blah blah blah. Get over it. I suggest you remember how you felt when confronted with some of the more smellier aspects of nursing. They don't really expose you with this sort of thing when your training at uni and it can be a difficult thing to deal with.
    (my bolding)

    My mother-in-law is an RN, PhD, Clinical Nurse Specialist. She is also a respected published author, head of a teaching hospital's research dept, and serves as an expert witness in court cases.

    She does not feel that she is above the grittier aspects of nursing. She still regulary works the hospital floor to maintain contact with the every-day realities of nursing.

    The OP wrote that she does not even want to give bed baths.


    A couple of Thanksgivings ago, I was visiting my MIL when her elderly neighbor had an accident in his front yard, and bloodied himself from head to toe.
    My "university trained" mil did not stand back and let me- an ADN RN- deal it. She jumped right in and got her nice holiday outfit all bloody, just like I did.

    Also, when I was an LPN at an inpt hospice unit, one of the best RNs there was a PhD RN. She did plan to go into the "higher" aspects of nursing, but she said she felt she would not be an authentic nurse, and would not feel personally credible as a nurse scholar without paying her dues, and experiencing direct pt care.

    There is nothing wrong with working in the less carnal areas of nursing- but I do feel there is something wrong with wanting to step right over the fundamentals of nursing to do it.

    To quote E. Goldstein- Get over it, indeed.
    Last edit by Hellllllo Nurse on Nov 10, '07
  4. by   Hellllllo Nurse
    Quote from doe9181
    I'm a new grad (well I've been a nurse for a year) and I have no problem helping my CNA's and getting my hands dirty and neither do any of the other 50 people I graduated with. If anything I notice the older, more experienced nurses will let their patients sit in poop while they run wild looking for the techs to do all their dirty work. I see it all the time.
    Your experience is very different from mine.
    I was a CNA for three years, an LPN for eight ,and have been an RN for seven.

    I work in dialysis, where the techs do not undergo CNA training and are not taught how to deal with incontinance. Recently, a pt on tx soiled himself. The tech ran right over to me and said "You have a degree in this crap. You deal with it."

    There are a lot of dialysis techs who love doing needle cannulations, and giving heparin, but they shrink from anything that is "gross" or "not cool."

    In my experience, it doesn't matter if you are an CNA, an RN, or whatever. A person who has a good work ethic and is a team player will dive right in and take care of things.

    Education level and experience have little to do with it.
  5. by   Hellllllo Nurse
    Quote from Jelli_Belli
    I'm going to say something not so popular but here goes anyway. I graduate in 3 weeks from nursing school and I just accepted a position at an acute care psychiatric facility on a unit that only admits 18-50 y\o males with schizophrenia who are ambulatory and self-care.

    I sought this job out because a) I love treating patients with schizophrenia and b) I hate cleaning up feces and I know this type of patient is going to be 99% continent....

    I have worked w/ male schizophrenics. A number of them are chronic mastubators. They can leave things nastier than poo that need to be cleaned up.

    -And there ain't no way I'm embracing that.
    Last edit by Hellllllo Nurse on Nov 10, '07
  6. by   Hellllllo Nurse
    Originally Posted by Hellllllo Nurse
    From what I've been seeing, I think it's very true. At least in the US. Things may be different in Oz.

    Quote from MNmom3boys
    Hey, as a new grad I have to say that that remark is rather inflammatory.....
    That was inflammatory? Okay.
    Last edit by Hellllllo Nurse on Nov 10, '07
  7. by   gt4everpn
    hey wannabcrna!! i know the perfect place, out the nursing career door!! lol!, no seriously you cant run or hide from it!! although i've been a nurse for a year and i havent cleaned any poop yet, but guess where i work, ltc!!!!!!!:uhoh21:
  8. by   dria
    Quote from swee2000
    i don't think anyone said or meant that one is less of a nurse just because they don't deal with patients losing their bodily fluids on a day-to-day basis. rather, the argument being made is that some nurses....and i stress the word some....come across with this "holier than though/i'm above the law/i'm too good for that" attitude. thus, it is beneath them as nurses if they are ever asked or expected to do the tedious "cna tasks" because now that they have a bunch of initials after their name, doing anything more than what an rn or lpn does would be wrong and tarnishing to their reputation. guess what? i'm an lpn who bathes & toilets patients every day in addition to doing assessments(data collections), administering meds, etc. am i less of a nurse for doing so? no! am i more of a nurse for dong so? no! does it make me feel like i'm "doing the cna work"? no! to me, it's all a part of nursing!!

    as i mentioned in an earlier post, what did nurses do back in the day when they didn't have cnas? did they just leave the patients to soak in their own urine or stool, only to realize this leads to skin breakdown on top of other problems? or did they dive in and care for the patient at one of their most important times of need? some of us need to get off our high horses and bring our egos back down to reality.
    i don't disagree that this is an integral part of direct care, no matter the letters after your name, for the precise reasons that have been reiterated (and reiterated, and reiterated....) and i hope youre not implying that it is i upon that high horse....im afraid of heights!!!however, the original inquiry was:

    in clinicals we just give baths, clean up poop and puke, and feed patients. i honestly want nothing to do with this once i'm a nurse, so, where/what floors can i work on as a new grad, in order to avoid this? <snip>

    i have yet to see this issue addressed. instead, i have seen several responses claiming that this is inherent to the practice of nursing. that is simply not the case. in addition to direct care, nurses work in a variety of different areas, including administration, case management, community education, legal nurse consulting, life care planning, research, forensics, utilization review, chart auditing, quality assurance, education, accrediation, credentialing, writing, pharmaceuticals, telemedicine, ehealth. i am sure there are many other areas (and i grant that many of them do require a direct care background) it is my opinion that we should get back to the stated question, rather than the question of whether the performing of said tasks is inherent to the practice of nursing. i think we all know that it isnt.
    @
    Last edit by dria on Nov 10, '07
  9. by   kendel
    Quote from dria
    i don't disagree that this is an integral part of direct care, no matter the letters after your name, for the precise reasons that have been reiterated (and reiterated, and reiterated....) and i hope youre not implying that it is i upon that high horse....im afraid of heights!!!however, the original inquiry was:

    in clinicals we just give baths, clean up poop and puke, and feed patients. i honestly want nothing to do with this once i'm a nurse, so, where/what floors can i work on as a new grad, in order to avoid this? <snip>

    i have yet to see this issue addressed. instead, i have seen several responses claiming that this is inherent to the practice of nursing. that is simply not the case. in addition to direct care, nurses work in a variety of different areas, including administration, case management, community education, legal nurse consulting, life care planning, research, forensics, utilization review, chart auditing, quality assurance, education, accrediation, credentialing, writing, pharmaceuticals, telemedicine, ehealth. i am sure there are many other areas (and i grant that many of them do require a direct care background) it is my opinion that we should get back to the stated question, rather than the question of whether the performing of said tasks is inherent to the practice of nursing. i think we all know that it isnt.
    @
    dont you get it???
    it does not matter what floor you go on
    you will be required to start ivs etc and clean up poop if you have to

    you are responsible for the patient total care
    if the nurses aide dont feel like cleaning up the poop it becomes your job period

    if you dontlike it go work in an office
  10. by   dria
    deleted.

    jls is right.

    i will chill out, and return to the issue later.
    Last edit by dria on Nov 10, '07
  11. by   FireStarterRN
    Pot, meet kettle
  12. by   FireStarterRN
    Quote from dria
    deleted.

    jls is right.

    i will chill out, and return to the issue later.

    [mouse]
    i love it when people say i'm right
    [/mouse]
  13. by   philosophical
    Quote from swee2000
    I don't think anyone said or meant that one is less of a nurse just because they don't deal with patients losing their bodily fluids on a day-to-day basis. Rather, the argument being made is that some nurses....and I stress the word some....come across with this "holier than though/I'm above the law/I'm too good for that" attitude. Thus, it is beneath them as nurses if they are ever asked or expected to do the tedious "CNA tasks" because now that they have a bunch of initials after their name, doing anything more than what an RN or LPN does would be wrong and tarnishing to their reputation. Guess what? I'm an LPN who bathes & toilets patients every day in addition to doing assessments(data collections), administering meds, etc. Am I less of a nurse for doing so? No! Am I more of a nurse for dong so? No! Does it make me feel like I'm "doing the CNA work"? No! To me, it's all a part of NURSING!!

    As I mentioned in an earlier post, what did nurses do back in the day when they didn't have CNAs? Did they just leave the patients to soak in their own urine or stool, only to realize this leads to skin breakdown on top of other problems? Or did they dive in and care for the patient at one of their most important times of need? Some of us need to get off our high horses and bring our egos back down to reality.
    Bring our egos back to reality? Some of you sound very egotistical spouting that nursing is wholistic and that you treat the mind, body and spirit!! Hmm, well then, what are psychologists, physical therapists, chaplains and others for since you seem to 'take care' of it all??? FYI, I am not a nurse, but I think it's sensless to flame someone if they don't have an interest in bodily fluids. As others have stated here, there are many important areas of nursing that do not require daily contact with such things. Hmm, and I also see a lot of posts here LAUGHING about patients bodily fluids or accidents. Would this sound repectful to the patient and family if you did this to their face? You all need to relax, and people are entitled to differing opinions!

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