Does this bother anyone else? - page 6

I was just reading a post in another thread and came across the following statement that alarmed me: "i wish that i had chosen nursing in the first place because i need a recession Proof career". ... Read More

  1. by   kcochrane
    Quote from SoundofMusic
    A job is a job - and sadly, I also cannot make enough money doing what I'd REALLY like to do all day long (tend to the garden and raise chickens out in the country), so I have to be a nurse.
    That's where I'm lucky. I really like to be a nurse and I get paid to do it. Although I could be happy tending to a garden and raising chickens too.

    It does bring up a point though. I have told my kids that first of all, you have to work to live - that's a given. But at least find something you somewhat enjoy doing for those 40 hours. Hopefully they got it.
  2. by   Multicollinearity
    I think nurses can function with some autotelic motives and aspects, which is quite healthy, without having a "calling."

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Autotelic
  3. by   cardiacRN2006
    an autotelic person needs few material possessions and little entertainment, comfort, power, or fame because so much of what he or she does is already rewarding. because such persons experience flow in work, in family life, when interacting with people, when eating, even when alone with nothing to do, they are less dependent on the external rewards that keep others motivated to go on with a life composed of dull and meaningless routines. they are more autonomous and independent because they cannot be as easily manipulated with threats or rewards from the outside.

    thanks for the link multi! this really sums me up...
  4. by   heron
    Quote from camomile7
    Please let me clarify that to be a nurse, one simply cannot to it for the paycheck alone.
    Yes, one can. Job satisfaction is the key. Some derive their job satisfaction from doing it well. Some derive it from feeling that they are doing good in the world. Some derive it from being able to feed, clothe and shelter themselves and their families.

    And some derive it from the sense of moral superiority they get for doing it for the "right" reasons.

    Sorry, gang ... I'm having a curmudgeon moment ... I'm really fried with people trying to control my feelings and passing moral judgements on my motivation. Feh!

    The real issue is, what kind of shape are my patients in when you take report from me?
  5. by   cardiacRN2006
    Quote from heron

    The real issue is, what kind of shape are my patients in when you take report from me?

    Exactly!
  6. by   showbizrn
    Quote from nursing student 19
    you'd be surprised of how many make it through nursing school and not having an ounce compassion.

    some people can survive nursing school with just the thought of the being a " recession proof" career.

    how sad.
    though many try to dismiss
    compassion...

    it makes the difference
    between the nurse who
    functions safely and prudently
    and the nurse who is
    all that and
    goes that extra mile for the patient.

    while i most certainly
    want a safe and prudent nurse
    at my or my loved one's bedside,
    there is a blessing inherit
    for patients who have that
    nurse that goes that extra
    compassionate mile.

    i guess that can be said
    for any profession.
  7. by   heron
    Quote from showbizrn

    how sad.
    though many try to dismiss
    compassion...

    it makes the difference
    between the nurse who
    functions safely and prudently
    and the nurse who is
    all that and
    goes that extra mile for the patient.

    while i most certainly
    want a safe and prudent nurse
    at my or my loved one's bedside,
    there is a blessing inherit
    for patients who have that
    nurse that goes that extra
    compassionate mile.

    i guess that can be said
    for any profession.
    you have a point ... but it's possible to go the extra mile simply because it's the right thing to do for the patient. the same act could just as easily be a result of an excellent work ethic ... nothing to do with compasssion.

    google a book, ordered to care. i am on my way out the door, so don't have the time to get the full citation, but will be happy to do so if you wish. in it, the author theorizes that, possibly because it's been a female-dominated profession for so long, nursing is possibly the only profession that requires (according to some) a particular emotional stance as part of the job requirement. given that i do not believe we can, or should, control our emotional responses, it makes for some interesting reading.
    Last edit by heron on May 9, '09 : Reason: clarity
  8. by   whoknows56
    Everyone should remember that it IS unhealthy to LOVE your job. If you have the ability to go to work everyday being happy with what you are doing, that is great. If you are able to go to work everyday and just do the work that you need to do in a competent way, that is perfectly fine. You aren't hurting anyone in the process and you can support yourself and anyone else that you may need to support.

    The only thing you should love is your family. Everything else you should just enjoy doing. Once you get too attached to your job (aka love your job), you are most likely to get emotionally attached to the job. At the end of the day, it doesn't matter how much you love your job, your employer can still give you the pink slip on any random day. I know of a couple of nurses that said they loved their and were laid off (one after 30 years during surgery). They called her out of the surgery and told her she is now laid off. So don't get too attached to your job. Just make sure you are competent with your job so you can move to a new job if the time calls. Being in love with your job and not being competent will only backfire in the long haul.
  9. by   kcochrane
    Quote from whoknows56
    Everyone should remember that it IS unhealthy to LOVE your job. If you have the ability to go to work everyday being happy with what you are doing, that is great. If you are able to go to work everyday and just do the work that you need to do in a competent way, that is perfectly fine. You aren't hurting anyone in the process and you can support yourself and anyone else that you may need to support.

    The only thing you should love is your family. Everything else you should just enjoy doing. Once you get too attached to your job (aka love your job), you are most likely to get emotionally attached to the job. At the end of the day, it doesn't matter how much you love your job, your employer can still give you the pink slip on any random day. I know of a couple of nurses that said they loved their and were laid off (one after 30 years during surgery). They called her out of the surgery and told her she is now laid off. So don't get too attached to your job. Just make sure you are competent with your job so you can move to a new job if the time calls. Being in love with your job and not being competent will only backfire in the long haul.
    There is a difference between loving your job and loving what you are doing. It is not unhealthly to love what you are doing. It is unhealthly to stay in a job or profession you don't like. Just as I'm not going to knock someone for getting into a job for the paycheck as long as they have a good work ethic and care about those they are taking care of..please don't knock those that actually do love what they are doing. I am not emotionally attached ot the JOB, I'm emotionally attached to the profession. And yes, I know what its like to be laid off.

    And btw somedays I hate the administration, the way health care is these days, etc..but I love what I am doing. I believe I made a difference. The day I stop believing that is the day I leave nursing.
  10. by   LilPeonNo1
    I think the reason so many here are angry about those who say they're in it for the pay check is upbringing. How many of us heard repeatedly by ministers, pastors, or priests (etc...) growing up that money is the root of all evil? Many of us were taught as young children that money should never be a motivator for making decisions in life. It breeds corruption and immorality. At least that is what we heard. So, I think the concept is hard to grasp for some. But, this is the 21st century. Times are different in the here and now and for most of us it is a matter of survival. We have to work, we have to feed our families, so why not have a career in something that pays relatively well. Certainly I could think of many occupations that would have made me happier in life, but they were not practical. Nursing was not my first choice in a profession either, but I'd been told I might be good at it from previous experiences and so when it came time to make that decision I opted for it. I wasn't sure going through school that I would even continue, but afterward I felt I was good at what I do and found I enjoyed many aspects of nursing. Although I sometimes hate it as well. Everyone has their own reasons for going into this profession and it doesn't mean they'll be better or worse than someone else, they just have a different approach.
  11. by   muffylpn
    sorry-guess it doesn't bother me cause people have been choosing nursing for about the
    last 10 yrs cause of the pay. And as far as recession proof - I guess these are nurses that
    work in states other then MA. and CA.- ask the new grads from those states how many of
    them have jobs in those states.
  12. by   AZ_LPN_8_26_13
    Some good, thought provoking responses on this discussion thread - thanks everyone for posting them. We all have our own reasons for wanting to get into nursing. A secure job that pays well so you can support yourself and your family is a valid reason IMO. But I do believe that having a desire to help others and to do more than just make money helps. I'm a guy, in his mid-fifties, and have done a lot of things in the past - mostly for the money. Taking a bit of a different route now, and not by my own instigation. I am trusting to someone else that this will all work out in the end. I don't know if anyone nowdays can really understand that. Not saying that it's the best way or the only way, or that others who don't feel the same way aren't right - It's just the way I've decided to take.

    The advice given that you shouldn't love your job too much is spot on. I've always believed in keeping your professional life and your personal life seperate, no matter how much you like what you do. I've been laid off in the past myself, and for me standing in an unemployment line is more than just a metaphor - I've actually done it.

    No, nursing wasn't my first choice for a career. I look back and think, I should have done something like this ten or fifteen years ago, but oh well, here I am now and that's what counts. If I could do absolutely anything without regard to money, the economy, society and it's needs, etc. I probably would be on a ranch somewhere in Montana, hunting and fishing in my spare time, and tramping through the mountains. But God has placed me here in this time and in this place, and so far it's been interesting, and it looks to be an interesting and exciting ride.
  13. by   paddlelady
    I have seen in other posts about those wanting to go into nursing as it is recession proof. That makes me very uncomfortable. It is not good for the instituition, the team, the patients and family. Someone mentioned the stress involved the hours etc and no the pay does not compensate a person for all the stress involved. I also think about my family or myself that might end up needing care and it frightens me to think that there are those that are just in it to have a job and not really care about outcomes and look at the whole person. To be a nurse involves being fully present, knowledgeable, caring, a case manager, social worker, pharmacist, nutritionist , mediator, spiritual an educator and so much more. We deal with all those aspects of patient care. We may not be trully knowledge in all .However, we are aware that a patient may need these specific servies. I think one can have other passions such as music and art , sailing and climbing moutains, travel. This makes us much more rounded as a person and better to deal with the stress of nursing. If I didnt have my music and sailing I would have been a basket case a long time ago. I went into nursing years ago as I wanted to help and care for people. It was not just a job for me. But I made sure that I had a life and didnt become my profession. You need the other things in life. Knitting, sewing reading, walks in the park and animals. These things also give us the ability to communicate with pateints. Finding a common ground when someone is fearful in the medical setting can alleviate some of the patient fears. I hope those that think nursing is recession proof will rethink. It is not. Years ago when the hospitals were closing many RN's lost their jobs. Yes, I was around when the hospitals closed. Day surgeries were becoming the new wave and we didnt need the inpatient care. Some nurses relearned others changed professions. Many clinics went from RN's to medical assistances and these nurses had to find other specialities. This was difficult for some during this transition. There will always be changes in medicine and nurses are usually the ones that are hit with the transitions and sometimes it can be your job . It doenst have to be in a time of recessions. We are so use to our routines which are good but medicine needs the varaiations and changes to make way for new therapies. I rest my case
    Paddlelady

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