Does anybody else feel like this?

  1. Hi,
    Well I just finished up the 3rd semester of an ADN program. I have one more semester to go and then I will be a nurse. As exciting as this is, I am also freaking out. What if I don't know enough yet to be out there on my own. Does anybody else feel this way? I am a good student and have been successful in my classes and clinical, but I don't know if any of that matters. I guess I am scared of looking dumb to my preceptor and other fellow nurses when I am a new grad.
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    About dreamann

    Joined: May '09; Posts: 10; Likes: 2

    6 Comments

  3. by   newtress
    You took ALL the words right out of my mouth. I just graduated three weeks ago and since I haven't been in class, at clinicals or even been back to the college since, it feels like all this nursing school business (and pain) didn't even happen. Like I had some kind of long term illness and now the pain is gone, like a bad dream. I don't feel prepared to be out there and officially/legally care for patients. I don't feel at all like the program or my instructors prepared me enough for the real world of nursing. I mostly blame the structure of nursing programs in general. Doesn't matter if you went to school in New York or California, the premise is the same. Tons of theory, exams and paperwork does not equal nurse to patient care. Every single patient is individualized in my mind. Every single implimentation is customized, yet nursing programs are hell bent on classroom scenarios and lecture when I think more time should be spent actually applying the steps and phases of our training in clinical. Instead, the first two levels I spent my mornings doing CNA duties and linen changes and the instructors and staff nurses are soooo concerned that it is done, and gives the staff CNA's a vacation. I'm completely against this approach because so much valuable floor time in clinical is wasted to this. We student nurses had vitals and bedmaking down in the first semester. Oh, I'm fully prepared to monitor and do CNA tasks, but the real nursing that I thought a college of nursing would have trained me for only stepped up a few real nursing tasks the last 4 weeks of school. Shame on them. :imbar
  4. by   cardiacmadeline
    I think most nurses feel this way. Starting your nursing career is scary and overwhelming, and no, you don't know enough yet to be on our own, but that's why you have an orientation. I don't know about everyone else, but I feel like most of everything I know now I learned on the job and not in school. Don't worry about looking dumb in front of your preceptor, you preceptor is there to guide you and teach you. If they are a good preceptor, they will understand what it is like to be a new nurse. Ask questions, even if they seem dumb, this is how you will learn. If new nurses are not asking questions, that's when I worry because it either means they have no idea what they are doing or they think they know everything and that they don't need to ask questions. They say it takes a couple of years to become a competent nurse and be comfortable and confident in your nursing skills. So, everything you are feeling is totally normal! Best of luck to you!
  5. by   Mrs.BSN71109
    I finished up my preceptorship and graduated in May and I felt just like you. My preceptor was very hard on me and pushed me A LOT! But believe me that's what you want, don't worry about looking dumb you're a student so you are learning (we are all learning), ask before you do anything you are unsure of, even if you think you're sure double check a good preceptor will appreciate your willingness to learn and ask. Don't ever think you know it all, that's a sure fire way to get your preceptor to not allow you any autonomy. I'm not sure if at your school they allow you choices of where you get to go for your preceptorship, but if they do challenge yourself... don't go the easy route and pick something you're very comfortable with go for something that will challenge you. I had the choice of L/D, Med. Surg, or ICU. I wanted Med Surg because I thought it would be just like clinicals.... I got ICU and I was sooooo scared I even asked my instructor if I could switch. Luckily she didn't let me and I absolutely fell in love with ICU and I learned soo much.
    I feel prepared to be nurse but I'm still scared of the responsibility, just remember most if not all hospitals will assign you a preceptor for the first 6- 8 weeks on the job depending on your area.
    don't worry you'll be ok only 2 more semesters!!
  6. by   josinda421
    Quote from newtress
    You took ALL the words right out of my mouth. I just graduated three weeks ago and since I haven't been in class, at clinicals or even been back to the college since, it feels like all this nursing school business (and pain) didn't even happen. Like I had some kind of long term illness and now the pain is gone, like a bad dream. I don't feel prepared to be out there and officially/legally care for patients. I don't feel at all like the program or my instructors prepared me enough for the real world of nursing. I mostly blame the structure of nursing programs in general. Doesn't matter if you went to school in New York or California, the premise is the same. Tons of theory, exams and paperwork does not equal nurse to patient care. Every single patient is individualized in my mind. Every single implimentation is customized, yet nursing programs are hell bent on classroom scenarios and lecture when I think more time should be spent actually applying the steps and phases of our training in clinical. Instead, the first two levels I spent my mornings doing CNA duties and linen changes and the instructors and staff nurses are soooo concerned that it is done, and gives the staff CNA's a vacation. I'm completely against this approach because so much valuable floor time in clinical is wasted to this. We student nurses had vitals and bedmaking down in the first semester. Oh, I'm fully prepared to monitor and do CNA tasks, but the real nursing that I thought a college of nursing would have trained me for only stepped up a few real nursing tasks the last 4 weeks of school. Shame on them. :imbar

    I sooo feel you on that. I also felt I wasn't well prepared. But nursing comes with exprience. Now I see why they pay you based on number of experiences you have.lol
  7. by   orkbrother
    I felt like that a bit too but I was a tech before I was a nurse. It took a lot of the anxiety away. I still had some but I knew what to expect so to speak. The flow of the floor is learned. Plus working a few codes will really break you in. As long as you are open to criticism and don't let your skin get too thin you will be fine. Like someone said before me, ask questions. There are no more stupid questions. I asked them all
  8. by   kmarie724
    I've been working as an RN since April, and I still sometimes feel like I don't know what I'm doing. Every night at the end of my shift I worry that I am forgeting to chart something or do something, even though logically I know that I have done everything I am expected to do.

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