Do you love nursing or hate it???

  1. I am a young 29 and I am thinking about changing careers into nursing. I was so excited to transition, but now after researching different sites, I am starting to get second doubts because of all the blogs I have read about why nursing is bad and how people hate nursing.

    I have read wonderful blogs about loving nursing but its sad how reading so many negatives one stick in one's head!

    Do you love nursing?
    Do you hate nursing?
    Why??

    Has anyone changed careers to do nursing and realize they love it or hate it?

    I appreciate your honest feedback. Thanks!!!
  2. Visit ysin profile page

    About ysin

    Joined: Jun '09; Posts: 17

    56 Comments

  3. by   Lacie
    After 30 years I wish I had made other choices in my career other than nursing that's for sure. I'm tired of being abused, tired of not be able to care for my own health and tired of bully bosses. The money stinks and a good example of last time I was ill and needed off, my administrator would not and didnt answer the phone therefore I had no choice but to work with a temp of 101. Yep I definitely wish I had gone to law as I initially wanted.
  4. by   ysin
    Thanks for your feedback. I am afraid that will happen once I start the profession. I am an interior designer at a commercial firm in Chicago. And when I tell people, they think that I have a fabulous career, but in fact, I hate it. I have similar reasons - bad bosses, fake co-workers, demanding clients and stressful deadlines. The perks of the job is seeing the final product, but I have concluded that its still not worth it. And I understand that every profession will have similar frustrations of not liking my bosses (difficult & poor management skills), caddy co-workers (try working in an industry where design and being presentable is shoved down your throat), and feeling unappreciated.

    But does knowing that you are impacting someone's life make nursing better? I went into design thinking that I was going to be sculpting spaces to improve the health, safety & well-being of individuals. Unfortunately since money dictates the world, I am not designing in the best interest of the clients employees, but how I can build a space under budget for law firms, hotels, corporate offices.

    I am sorry that I am so wordy - I think this is somewhat therapeutic (can you tell that I have been beaten down in the architectural industry??)

    I am thinking of getting my masters to be a NP or CRNA after a few years of being a RN. Do you think that this will make a difference or will I find that it does not make a difference?

    Thank you so much for your time!
  5. by   Chewie_123
    Even though I have only been an RN for (almost) 10 months, most mornings I get home and cry in the shower from anger and frustration. In the time I have been working, the staffing/work load/acuity has changed on my floor so much that it feels like I do nothing but throw pills and IV narcotics at people while kissing their butts.
    Our manager is someone who has never worked a med/surg floor.
    Daily happenings at the nurse's station trigger flashbacks from high school.
    Even though you have a Dr's note, 40 degree fever, and are coughing up green goo, you are severly penalized for missing work.
    And I just got a whopping 4 and a HALF cent raise.
    I could go on, but I won't.

    The thing is, as horrible as it is most of the time, I can't imagine doing anything else. (although I am keeping the Jedi option open)
    The moments I get to spend helping a patient understand something, or holding the hand of one who is dying, or when a LOL grabs my hand and asks if I'll be back the next night, and the occasional hug keep me going.

    I think if there is an area you are passionate about, and advanced degree will help get you there. If there is one constant in nursing, it is that you should never stop learning.
  6. by   vashtee
    I love it most days, and occassionally, when I have a really bad day, I hate it. One of the biggest positives is that I am never bored. I do get a little tired of hearing a few people complain about pretty much everything, though.

    My boss is okay, and if I am sick, I call in sick. Of course, I rarely miss work.
  7. by   subee
    After 35 years, would do it all over again. Enjoyed the floor when I was younger and got MSN at 37. Very hard stressful work, very intellectually interesting and fulfilling.
  8. by   Mulan
    Quote from Lacie
    After 30 years I wish I had made other choices in my career other than nursing that's for sure. I'm tired of being abused, tired of not be able to care for my own health and tired of bully bosses. The money stinks and a good example of last time I was ill and needed off, my administrator would not and didnt answer the phone therefore I had no choice but to work with a temp of 101. Yep I definitely wish I had gone to law as I initially wanted.

    bully bosses and bully coworkers
  9. by   ysin
    Thank you so much for the wonderful feedback. And I am excited to keep researching my options. I am going to first start volunteering at one the hospitals in Chicago. Do any of you know which Chicago Hospital would be a great place for me to get a good feel of the environment?
    I love that some of you said that you do not get bored.

    AND SUBEE - It is so good to see that you would do it all over again.

    I just need to keep asking and interviewing nurses and hopefully get into a program this fall/winter.

    Thank you !!!!!!!
  10. by   iteachob
    For the most part I've been satisfied with my career choice. I started out on day shift post-partum and lasted there about 18 months (boredom). I transferred to the NICU (level III) on night shift and absolutely loved it. I worked at 2 NICU's and really enjoyed it; learned so much. When I worked in the hospital, night shift was definitely my preferred shift.......commaradarie, slower (usually) pace, better pay, etc.

    I've been a nurse educator (academic) for the past 14 years. I have a great deal of flexibility as to hours, and plenty of time for vacation....about 4 months a year, in fact. Obviously, I am not a faculty member at a large research institution! I mentioned in the previous paragraph that I learned a lot working NICU. It pales in comparison to what I have learned as an educator. Though the pay is not the best you can get in nursing, I'm happy. I have a great boss, and wonderful co-workers. The students, too, are a pleasure to work with.
  11. by   SpringerCab
    I didn't want to be a nurse, I wanted to be a school teacher. My parents thought it would be a good idea for me to become a nurse and then if I wanted to go back to school and be a teacher I could. That was 30 years ago and I am glad that my parents talked me into it. I don't love nursing, but I don't hate it either. I agree that it is hard, poor bosses, co workers, patients and families that don't appreciate you all make it that way. It has been a good place for me though. I have learned so much. I learned a long time ago that bosses and administration normally are not appreciative of what we do, but most of the time patients and their families are and isn't that what is most important. After 30 years I don't work on the floor, but in the Clinical Informatics department at my hospital as one of the educator/trainers. Funny how things work out, I wanted to be a teacher and 30 years later that is exactly what I am doing. There are so many different areas in nursing that maybe you will find what you are looking for.
  12. by   HippyGreenPeaceChick
    I am young and fairly new. But I never cease to amaze myself on how much I love nursing.
  13. by   interleukin
    "therefore I had no choice but to work with a temp of 101."

    Sorry, you did have a choice, and you chose to work.
  14. by   sunray12
    Quote from ysin
    thanks for your feedback. i am afraid that will happen once i start the profession. i am an interior designer at a commercial firm in chicago. and when i tell people, they think that i have a fabulous career, but in fact, i hate it. i have similar reasons - bad bosses, fake co-workers, demanding clients and stressful deadlines. the perks of the job is seeing the final product, but i have concluded that its still not worth it. and i understand that every profession will have similar frustrations of not liking my bosses (difficult & poor management skills), caddy co-workers (try working in an industry where design and being presentable is shoved down your throat), and feeling unappreciated.

    but does knowing that you are impacting someone's life make nursing better? i went into design thinking that i was going to be sculpting spaces to improve the health, safety & well-being of individuals. unfortunately since money dictates the world, i am not designing in the best interest of the clients employees, but how i can build a space under budget for law firms, hotels, corporate offices.

    i am sorry that i am so wordy - i think this is somewhat therapeutic (can you tell that i have been beaten down in the architectural industry??)

    i am thinking of getting my masters to be a np or crna after a few years of being a rn. do you think that this will make a difference or will i find that it does not make a difference?

    thank you so much for your time!
    based on the highlighted parts above to be honest i don't think you'll like nursing. going from interior design to hospital work would probably involve too much culture shock unless you really know what you're getting into. if you have close family members or close friends who are nurses who give you blow for blow detail about what their work is like - or if you've been actively involved in nursing a loved one through catastrophic illness you may know what you want. if you haven't then probably you should make sure you know what you're doing before you jump ship coz aggravation aside, interior design is a whole lot cleaner than nursing. suggestion: shadow some nurses and get your cna and get a job in a hospital or skilled nursing facility. then you'll have a good idea of whether or not you think nursing is something you want to get into.

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