Do you ever get tired of hearing this phrase?

  1. "I'm so afraid I'm going to lose my license!"

    This is one of my biggest pet peeves about this site. It seems like several times a day where someone (usually a new nurse) is working in a busy facility and fears that they are going to lose their license by making some kind of error. Most people even cite this as their reason for quitting their job. LTC and SNFs seems to be the biggest offenders.

    So I did a search on the words "I lost my license" and read through several pages of posts about the subject. Guess what? Not ONE post about someone who legitimately lost their license due to a patient care issue. They were all related to drug use/abuse or a felony crimes.

    I understand that there are some facilities that put you in unsafe working conditions. But it's really not that easy to lose your license. Even published stories about people who made fatal medication errors have retained their nursing licenses.

    So please, let's get it straight that you're highly unlikely to lose your license because you're working in a busy hospital, or LTC, or a SNF with a high census. You might not like working in a busy environment like that, but quitting because you feel your "license is in jeopardy" is not a realistic reason. If you do this, you are probably denying yourself a great opportunity to learn and grow as a nurse.

    That's my vent for today. Thanks for listening.
    •  
  2. Visit Double-Helix profile page

    About Double-Helix, BSN, RN

    Joined: Apr '11; Posts: 3,484; Likes: 6,955

    54 Comments

  3. by   ChuckeRN
    That phrase does get a little annoying for me when I hear it from other correctional nurses who send every inmate with a BS story up to the ER. YOU are a RN just like me, so assess the inmate and send em to me if you think it's an emergency or a situation that can't wait until the yard nurse or doctor can see them. Fer cryin out loud.
  4. by   DixieRedHead
    In twenty years I have never know anyone to lose their license except for drugs and/or stealing, there was one instance of documenting care that wasn't done, and the nurse didn't even who up for a hearing. She probably would have been given some classes, and gotten smacked by the BON, but that's about it.
  5. by   SuesquatchRN
    It's beaten into you in school so no, it doesn't bother me when new nurses over-use it. And on my very first job I was reported to the BON for neglect when the ADON's DIL screwed something up. They decided it was unfounded, which it was, but there are unscupulous people out there.
  6. by   classicdame
    I especially get tired of it when a nurse says that about another licensed person that they are supervising. Even if you are the charge nurse the other nurses are working under their own license, not yours.
  7. by   mazy
    It makes me completely batty.
  8. by   Esme12
    Actual cases where nurses lost their licenses and no drugs. Pt neglect/abuse and HIPAA are the new buzz reasons for revoking a nurses license.


    Nurse Loses License in Hepatitis Outbreak

    Patient dies under care of fill-in nurse in Oakland, CA

    Nurse suicide follows infant tragedy


    2. Impersonating Another Licensed Practitioner

    Believe it or not, this happens. And employers sometimes don't catch it for years. A wannabe nurse may have a felony conviction that will prevent him from getting a license, or she may have had her own license revoked in the past. Whatever the case, identity theft is plausible if these "nurses" can obtain the correct papers. Whatever license you may or may not have will be immediately revoked by your state board, and that will stay on your record.

    4.Providing a False Copy of License

    Although rare, this does occur. Nurses who have a suspended license may provide an employer with a fake license, thinking that once their suspension is up it won't matter. It does matter, though - especially if your employer finds out. The license you may have will be revoked, or, if you don't have a license, you will not be allowed to ever apply for a license.
    5. Mail fraud

    Mail fraud encompasses many felonies. Broadly speaking, mail fraud involves using the postal service to unlawfully obtain money or valuables, impersonate someone other than yourself, or stealing someone else's mail. There are many kind of mail fraud including work-from-home scams, solicitation disguised as an invoice, and online auction fraud. Mail fraud may not be directly related to nursing, but it can directly affect your career if you are convicted. Mail fraud is yet another way you can lose your license.
    6. Falsifying Patient Records

    Maybe you had been working 12 hours and were too tired to complete that patient record. Maybe you gave your patient a little extra morphine to help him get through the night, but you didn't record it. Whatever the case, falsifying patient records is grounds for license revocation. In the best-case scenario, your falsified record gets you in trouble, but doesn't affect anyone else. Worst-case scenario? Something happens to your patient.
    7. Unprofessional Conduct

    This broad term allows state boards to be subjective in judging why a nurse might get his license revoked. "Unprofessional conduct" can range from using inappropriate language around colleagues and patients to having an affair with a superior. Although it seems obvious, many nurses fail to understand why their conduct may be called into question. The level of professionalism in the nursing field is of the utmost importance, and employers won't take kindly to those few nurses who exhibit inappropriate behavior of any sort. First-time offenders may only be reprimanded or suspended temporarily, but keep it up and you may be out of a job before you know it.
    Hosting a Pornographic Website
    Believe it or not - it happens. Just this last year, a nurse in Pennsylvania got her licensed revoked because she was hosting her own pornographic website. This most likely falls under "Unprofessional Conduct," and it's easy to chuckle at. But with today's advancements in technology, and the widespread range of the internet, nurses who use their webcams to do a little work on a side may find themselves without a job.

    8. Hosting a Pornographic Website

    Believe it or not - it happens. Just this last year, a nurse in Pennsylvania got her licensed revoked because she was hosting her own pornographic website. This most likely falls under "Unprofessional Conduct," and it's easy to chuckle at. But with today's advancements in technology, and the widespread range of the internet, nurses who use their webcams to do a little work on a side may find themselves without a job.
    9. Patient Abuse and Neglect

    Sadly, this is quite obvious and, even worse, happens more often than we'd like to admit. Patient neglect and abuse can happen because a nurse is intentionally causing pain and/or suffering, or because of a simple mistake because a nurse is over-worked or has too many patients. One of the most serious offenses, patient neglect and abuses affects more than just the nurse, and even more than just the patient. The patient's friends and family must also suffer alongside him/her, making this grave offense even worse.
    Unfortunately, this happens all too often. Many times, a nurse doesn't neglect a patient on purpose, but her forgetfulness can cause more damage than imagined and result in the loss of her license.
    http://nursinglink.monster.com/benef...ursing-license
  9. by   wooh
    Ergh, hosting a porn site will threaten your license? That annoys me. I wouldn't host my own porn site, but what I do on my own time is my business.
  10. by   SweetsRN522
    I think for new nurses it hard to adapt to some of the challenges that are thrown your way. In school it was pushed into your head how easily you can lose your license if you make a mistake. I know being a newer graduate nurse(2 years under my belt) that I felt this way too. As a new nurse you go through transition periods where you learn to grow. While I was in my new nurse residency program they shared this with me (look at page 3 for image)
    http://www.nursingthefuture.ca/assets/File/Stages.pdf

    It shows how newer nurses go from shock, to crisis, to knowing. In the crisis mode it is usually around the 4-5 month mark that individuals start worrying about their career, license, competency and ability to be a nurse. Often this is shortly after they have been released to practice by themselves. Usually they are overwhelmed, scared, worried they will "lose their license". I remember being like this. After going to a MOCK deposition while in school, I was scared when I got out into practice. I realize now that it was all just part of the new nurse transition. I am now a lot more confident in my abilities and I do not fret loosing my license anymore. I learned to manage time better, evaluate critical situations, and most importantly ask questions and know my resources.

    Nursing is a stressful but rewarding position. Despite the fact that I still worry in some situations I know now that I am supported and protected by the organization I work for and the BON. I clearly and concisely document accurately and thoroughly, so if anything ever happened I would be able to recall what I was thinking at the time. I know that if I was not competent enough to be a nurse I would not have made it through nursing school, passed my boards on the first time, and have been recognized for clinical excellence and knowledge. It is all a part of the process. I agree it can get frustrating to see the same posts over and over again, it is like hearing the same song on the radio or watching the same commercial over and over again. I will never forget what it was like those few months of transition and if it wasn't for the 15 others hired with me I may have left my job and considered another career too. I am glad I didn't

    :bowingpurAll of you seasoned, experience nurses, we look up to you for guidence and wisdom and hope to be as confident, proficient and skilled as you one day. I am assuming all the questions posted on here about that are just posted to get reassurance and support that everything will be alright. I agree though the only way to learn and become proficient is to keep chugging along and to not give up if the going gets tough.
  11. by   Esme12
    Quote from wooh
    Ergh, hosting a porn site will threaten your license? That annoys me. I wouldn't host my own porn site, but what I do on my own time is my business.
    I know right?? I wouldn't either but I have always felt that I don't care what somebody does at home as long as it doesn't hurt children or animals and as long as they were good at work.....
  12. by   phoenixrn
    As long as the nurse isn't hosting her porn website DRESSED UP AS A NURSE!!! Wish the BON could go after porn sites that have a "nurse theme."

    Sorry to get off track here
  13. by   psu_213
    I acutally posted something a few months ago...something to the effect of "what do you really have to do to lose yor license?" because of the number of people who automatically throw out "I'm afraid I will lose my license!!!!!!!!!!!" over every little thing.

    For example: I gave someone 25 of lopressor when I should have give 50. The DON told me she is going to report me to the board. I'm going to lose my license!!

    Or: "Some other nurse on another shift had a HIPPA [sic] violation. Will I looose [sic] my license????????

    Yes, as far as I am concerned, people say it too often.
  14. by   SAHMnurse
    I'm not as worried about loosing my license as I am worried about making a mistake. It is true, when I was in critical care I often worried I would make an error or miss something. Not an unimportant error, but a major error. I would never forgive myself...I guess I am one of those worry warts.

close