Communication a problem for nurses rock climbing the answer?

  1. What I was wondering was has anyone found that miscommunication between doctor and nurse, patient and nurse or any other combination caused problems for you?
    If so what would you like to see done about it. What I was thinking for our staff was enrolling them in a rock-climbing course to learn the importance of crystal clear communication that you can only get from a sport such as climbing. Do you think this is a good idea andwould you like to see it used at you facility?

    Thanks for the advice
    Moonscar
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    About moonscar

    Joined: Aug '06; Posts: 4

    30 Comments

  3. by   UM Review RN
    Heck no, I'd probably kill myself rock-climbing.

    I can't even make my way around the bed without slamming my leg into something!

    Can you think of something a little more sedentary for us ol' folks?
  4. by   UM Review RN
    How about something like this?

    http://www.buildingyourteam.com/
  5. by   moonscar
    We thought about programs like that but none seemed to get the point across as seriously and efficiently as we had wanted. The reason we had picked rock climbing is because its safe, but also has some fear to it and that is why we thought it was a good pick. It hits home the point of what happens if there is miscommunication.
    Do you think it would be a valid option to continue using?
    Thanks for all the advice
    moonscar
  6. by   santhony44
    I agree with Angie. Unless you have a group of unusually athletic folks, rock climbing wouldn't work.

    And even then, you may have someone with a fear of heights!!

    A lot of people who are plenty mobile enough to work can't or won't do things like rock climbing on a bet.
  7. by   rn/writer
    There are ropes courses that involve high elements (rock or pole climbing), low elements, or both. The low elements courses are not nearly as physical but do involved trust-building exercises such as falling back into a group of your co-workers and believing they will catch you. I guess people should have a bit of warning before the course so they have a few weeks to be nice to everyone.
  8. by   UM Review RN
    Quote from moonscar
    We thought about programs like that but none seemed to get the point across as seriously and efficiently as we had wanted. The reason we had picked rock climbing is because its safe, but also has some fear to it and that is why we thought it was a good pick. It hits home the point of what happens if there is miscommunication.
    Do you think it would be a valid option to continue using?
    Thanks for all the advice
    moonscar
    Personally, I wouldn't be able to do the exercise successfully, as I'm overweight. IMHO, I already have a strike against me as people perceive overweight workers negatively. To force me to do a physical activity that would only reinforce those erroneous ideas would be unfair.

    Seems to me that if you want true teamwork, you pretty much have to find some activity that everyone can perform.

    Again, JMO.
  9. by   leslie :-D
    Quote from moonscar
    We thought about programs like that but none seemed to get the point across as seriously and efficiently as we had wanted. The reason we had picked rock climbing is because its safe, but also has some fear to it and that is why we thought it was a good pick. It hits home the point of what happens if there is miscommunication.
    Do you think it would be a valid option to continue using?
    Thanks for all the advice
    moonscar
    i thought the link that angie provided was perfect.
    an effective commincator should not have any problem in articulating the reason(s) for any proposed seminars.

    i think with the rock-climbing idea, you're setting people up to react, rather than act.
    while it may provide a powerful impact, it doesn't necessarily set the stage for implementing gen'l strategies that one might use in variable situations.
    the link that angie provided, sounds dynamic, results-oriented and versatile.
    jmo of course.

    leslie
  10. by   catlady
    I would refuse to participate. Period.

    But then, I have been forced into numerous touchy-feely "team building" exercises, none of which do anything. You build teams and facilitate communication by hiring good people and giving them the support they need.
  11. by   moonscar
    All very good and thoughtfull points
    Thanks for the advice
    As for people refusing to climb thats fine, there are other supporting jobs for the people who don't want to climb. The way it would be set up is that there are four other positions that they could do such as spotter, belayer and rope coiler among others. That way they are still involved and being supportive, which is the most important aspect to the people that are climbing. Would that sway anyone?

    Thanks again your answers have been very helpfull
    moonscar
  12. by   UM Review RN
    I only know that I would not be able to do the climbing because in my younger, thinner days, I was always climbing to the roof for one thing or another. (Some days, just for the view....) That involved climbing up about 40 feet of fieldstone.

    So I kinda have an idea of what's involved.

    I could probably do the spotter position, if you could assure me that if some climber (or rock) fell on me, I'd get my medical bills paid for?
    Last edit by UM Review RN on Aug 28, '06
  13. by   Jami RN
    So, I'd have to be the fat girl at the bottom of the rock coiling the rope and helping my athletic co-workers climb to the top? Gee! That sounds like a lot of fun for me, doesn't it?

    Honestly, I think this exercise would create an even bigger divide in your team between young/old, fat/thin, athletic/sedentary, etc.

    Personally, I wouldn't attend. I have attended a great ropes course in the past where almost everyone was able to participate and learn to some extent. But I agree with a previous poster -- hire good people and give them the tools to do their jobs well. Recognize those who contribute to the team in a positive way. Get rid of negative people who aren't interested in doing a good job. That would solve your problem.
  14. by   VivaLasViejas
    Quote from Jami RN
    So, I'd have to be the fat girl at the bottom of the rock coiling the rope and helping my athletic co-workers climb to the top? Gee! That sounds like a lot of fun for me, doesn't it?

    Honestly, I think this exercise would create an even bigger divide in your team between young/old, fat/thin, athletic/sedentary, etc.

    Personally, I wouldn't attend. I have attended a great ropes course in the past where almost everyone was able to participate and learn to some extent. But I agree with a previous poster -- hire good people and give them the tools to do their jobs well. Recognize those who contribute to the team in a positive way. Get rid of negative people who aren't interested in doing a good job. That would solve your problem.
    :yeahthat:

    Frankly, if I wanted to suffer the tortures of high-school gym classes again, this newfangled, New Agey-type "fix" would be just the ticket. But I have long since left my teenage years behind, and I am now nothing more than a tired, crabby, overweight, out-of-shape, middle-aged grandmother doing the best she can to make it to retirement. In the meantime, I'm with the poster who said to hire good people and give 'em whatever they need to succeed......it doesn't have to be any more complicated---or dangerous!---than that. Really.:wink2:

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