Collegiality- Bedside Nursing vs. CRNA

  1. Just a quick question of the licensed nurses* out there. Does there seem to be more collegiality among bedside nurses or the more advanced practice nurses ie NP, CRNA, etc? I know people are people, but I seem to see more collegiality among the advanced practice nurses as opposed to many (not all) in bedside nursing. I see the advanced practice folks more like the medical interns and residents I work, with having a helpful attitude and much commaradarie. Many thanks as I have not been in the profession as long as some on the board.

    *Sorry but people on the board used to explain that after being a student you would have a different understanding and you do. Until you work as a nurse in a clinical setting your perceptions are different. Please don't be offended. I thought balderdash when I was a student, but I understand now.
  2. Visit 1happygirl profile page

    About 1happygirl

    Joined: Mar '06; Posts: 25

    12 Comments

  3. by   TazziRN
    Whaa.....?


    The two paragraphs do not make sense together............
  4. by   arpeggiated
    Congeniality?
  5. by   scrubby bubby
    Collegiality: (Definition)-
    1. Shared power and authority vested among colleagues.
    What the OP is saying makes perfect sense. See the defintion of collegiality above. Think "camaraderie"- the are similar. And the OP uses both words in her post. And, she also astericked a point to footnote it at the bottom of her post.

    I think what she's asking makes perfect sense... anyone who understands these definitions care to respond?
  6. by   scrubby bubby
    We don't have Advance Practice Nurses on my floor, so unfortunately, I can't answer your question, 1happygirl. But, I do understand perfectly what you're saying.
  7. by   TazziRN
    I know the definition of collegiality, I just didn't get the second paragraph in relation to the first.
  8. by   scrubby bubby
    It looks like the second paragraph is a footnote to an asterick she singled out in the first paragraph. Just pointing out the definition since arpeggiated didn't seem to grasp it.
  9. by   TrudyRN
    I think, as you said, people are people. In other words, it depends more on who the colleagues are, less on their titles.
  10. by   Altra
    The key to answering the OP's question probably lies in the definition:

    Quote from scrubby bubby
    Collegiality: (Definition)-
    1. Shared power and authority vested among colleagues.
    As is often discussed here at allnurses.com, it's hard to be collegial, or congenial for that matter, when you feel your work and/or your environment are out of your control.

    OP, in better environments where everyone feels they have a vested interest in patient outcomes, you'll see collegiality among RNs and all members of the health care team. In others you'll notice a very definite us vs. them mentality, usually born out of frustration over unrealistic expectations from patients, management, and/or coworkers.
  11. by   TraumaICURN
    Quote from TazziRN
    I know the definition of collegiality, I just didn't get the second paragraph in relation to the first.
    I think she is saying that she only wants licensed nurses to answer her question....no nursing students.
  12. by   1happygirl
    To clarify:

    1. Yes, the asterisk meant only liscensed nurses need respond (no offense to the students) and

    2. The question is about collegiality and camaraderie among co-workers/colleagues

    As several have pointed out, with vested patient outcomes there is a difference. It just seems to me there is a lot of "I'm going to report this-that, tick-tacking, etc" among colleagues (nurse to nurse) that does not appear present among the other members of the healthcare community I deal with on a day to day basis. It got me thinking especially since 2-3 people from my unit have just been accepted into advanced practice programmes.
    Last edit by 1happygirl on May 4, '07
  13. by   bigsyis
    Quote from TrudyRN
    I think, as you said, people are people. In other words, it depends more on who the colleagues are, less on their titles.
    Absolutely! You don't have to have a degree to act professionally and collegially and congenially. It sure would help the image of Nurses as Professionals if they did act that way, though!
  14. by   Altra
    Quote from 1happygirl
    It just seems to me there is a lot of "I'm going to report this-that, tick-tacking, etc" among colleagues (nurse to nurse) that does not appear present among the other members of the healthcare community I deal with on a day to day basis. It got me thinking especially since 2-3 people from my unit have just been accepted into advanced practice programmes.
    It may be "more" visible to you if that's the setting in which you're currently practicing. I know what you're saying ... some people seem incapable of letting even the smallest annoyance roll off their back without making a fuss and this is most definitely unprofessional behavior.

    But these people are present in every profession. Attend a few Grand Rounds ... you'll see that equally brutal "nit picking" sometimes occurs there too.

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