Changing career to nursing, last minute fear

  1. I'm a career switcher. Nursing school starts within three weeks. My mind suddenly gets a 180 degrees turn. Now I'm getting scared about nursing future and hate to quit my job so much.

    I remember five years ago IT was so hot, that many people jumped into it from other fields, starting from 2001, with massive layoffs and job outsourcing, IT new graduates had great difficulty landing a job, even many people who already had been working lost their jobs and had to look for other alternatives. Till today, the job market is still bad.
    I'm just scared now I'm going to be like some people in the IT bubble, jump right into the bubble, nursing is now hot. When I graduate from nursing school in two years, the bubble bursts and I would find myself nowhere to go with two years' investments completely lost.

    I guess basically my worry is, will there still be a nursing shortage two years later? Yes, population is getting older, but according to statistics, with the influx of immigrants, who are generally young, the average age of population actually goes down. And jobs markets is good now, lots of nurses reach retirement age, but with so many people changing career to nursing fields, with more and more accelerated programs educate fast-tracked nurses, and with so many foreign nurses come to this country, will the shortage last long?


    This forum has most people who have been working in nursing field for a long time and know the best about nursing. Maybe any of you can give me some suggestions or confidence, cool my worries. I could not even sleep for days. Any ideas is appreciated.
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    About mmr2

    Joined: Jul '06; Posts: 33; Likes: 1

    18 Comments

  3. by   traumaRUs
    Hi there and welcome! I came into nursing 14 years ago after 10 years in public affairs. It is scary changing careers. I certainly can't guarantee nursing will be going strong in two years, but I certainly hope so. I also can look to the job outlook (do a google search for statistics). Also, I know in my own family, that as my husband and I age, we will need medical care and we will need nurses.

    The unknown is always scary...sometimes ya just gotta jump in. Good luck.
  4. by   mmr2
    Quote from traumaRUs
    Hi there and welcome! I came into nursing 14 years ago after 10 years in public affairs. It is scary changing careers. I certainly can't guarantee nursing will be going strong in two years, but I certainly hope so. I also can look to the job outlook (do a google search for statistics). Also, I know in my own family, that as my husband and I age, we will need medical care and we will need nurses.

    The unknown is always scary...sometimes ya just gotta jump in. Good luck.
    I remember 5 years ago, job statistics say IT was so good, it is predicted Americans still need xxx thousands of computer programmers, just within one year, things got changed. I'm now skeptical about these job outlooks.
  5. by   RobCPhT
    Nursing will most likely always be in demand. Healthcare is big business. The good thing about Nursing is that there are so many fields you can go into and I don't think all of those fields can change that quickly. I will suggest this if you want job security, don't stop until you have a Masters if not a Doctorate. It is estimated that in 30 years college educated people will be competing for jobs that don't require a college degree. This is because so many colleges are churning out graduates in all fields. Consider this with Nursing just to name a few: hospital, consulting, pharmacy, management, home health care, community, IT, Sales, education, and this list goes on. Becoming a Nurse opens the doors to many career opportunities.
  6. by   rainer1707
    Why did you choose nursing? I graduated in May after working in the restaurant biz for 25 years. I was hired in mid July, and am working in the Special Care Unit, a step down unit, at a hospital in Cooperstown, N.Y. I love it and always knew I would. It was a matter of mustering up the courage and returning to school after 25 years. The shortage is predicted to last a long time in N.Y. There's not enough interest in the field. It was a long hard road, I just passed my boards. Although I realize I have a lot to learn, I feel like I'm where I belong. The rewards I feel at the bedside are incredible. They say nurses eat their young but I'm not so young and have only encountered support form my coworkers. Good luck to you!
  7. by   mmr2
    Many reasons I want to become a nurse. My childhood dream was to work in the healthcare filed taking care of patients. Somehow I ended up in accounting. Now I work for a small company. As you all know, accounting is boring, face the computer all day long, many tiny things to handle, with small money, I make 40K right now. The ceiling I predict is 60k if I keep in the accounting field.

    In the beginning I hate this job so much, now I'm getting used to it. Two bosses are extra nice to me. This is one reason I hate quiiting my job.

    There is another very personal reason. I'm a shy person, I'm 33 now. Not married, no kids. I love to have my own kids and I'm really worried now. My bodyfriend won't commit. He is making big money, maybe he doesn't think my future is good. I think very possible we'll end up breaking up. It's hard for me to meet new people in my life. I think going to nursing may change my life, meet more new people, change my way of living, with a more respected profession, I might be able to have my own family in the future.
  8. by   mmr2
    Quote from rainer1707
    Why did you choose nursing? I graduated in May after working in the restaurant biz for 25 years. I was hired in mid July, and am working in the Special Care Unit, a step down unit, at a hospital in Cooperstown, N.Y. I love it and always knew I would. It was a matter of mustering up the courage and returning to school after 25 years. The shortage is predicted to last a long time in N.Y. There's not enough interest in the field. It was a long hard road, I just passed my boards. Although I realize I have a lot to learn, I feel like I'm where I belong. The rewards I feel at the bedside are incredible. They say nurses eat their young but I'm not so young and have only encountered support form my coworkers. Good luck to you!
    Congratulations on passing the board!
  9. by   rainer1707
    I am also shy although I probably am not perceived that way. I would say if this is something you've always dreamed of, you should forge ahead. Make it happen for you and all the other things you're hoping for in life will probably fall into place. My children are teenagers, one going off to college in a couple of weeks. I waited because they needed me more, but if I had it to do over I would say it makes more sense to establish your career first. Your boyfriend will hang in there for you and if he doesn't, as sad as that would be, maybe it wasn't meant to be.

    I think we as women always put others needs first, you need to follow your dream. I feel when you achieve a goal like completing your RN degree you will find that you will be more of a whole person, if that makes sense....and once you accomplish something like that for yourself the rest will follow.
  10. by   browneyedgirl71
    MMR- I was an accountant as well, so I know first hand how boring that job can be. I'm starting the Nursing Program this Fall. I quit my job over a year ago and have never looked back. I was nervous at the time, but I knew I didn't want to be an accountant for the rest of my life. I made the leap and I'm so happy I did. I have LOVED all my classes and I feel that this is where my true passion lies.

    I know it's hard to make a life changing decision, especially when you are somewhat comfortable right now. It sounds like this is a dream of yours and I would say to follow that dream!
  11. by   TheCommuter
    Quote from mmr2
    I guess basically my worry is, will there still be a nursing shortage two years later?
    Actually, a nursing surplus existed in many parts of the U.S. as recent as the middle 1990s. Many nurses had extreme difficulty finding employment during this time period; in addition, nurse wages were not enticing.

    Believe it or not, but not all parts of the country are currently suffering from a nursing shortage. Several U.S. states actually have a surplus of nurses today, and four more states are projected to have a nursing surplus by the year 2020.
  12. by   dorimar
    You should also consider your other skills as they relate to nursing in you job security. You may have a lot of doors open to in nursing you with your IT background with the ever increasing computerized data in healthcare. You may be in huge demand.
  13. by   jenni82104
    TheCommuter, if this is true why is there so much hype about "the nursing shortage"? I too worry if I will be able to secure a job. I have to wait until next year to get in, the schools here are so full. I wonder if I will be able to get a job when I graduate.
  14. by   mmr2
    rainer1707, thanks for the encouragement! hope everything falls in the way.

    browneyedgirl71, hope you best! if you were doing a/p before, no matter how bad nursing market is, i am sure you made a wise decision and your job prospect after nursing school is definitely better than a/p.


    jenni82104, i heard the other way. it is to the benefits of the nurse union to argue there is a nursing shortage, no matter it is real or fake. in this way, they will be able to argue for pay increase, better work conditions, etc., to improve the attraction and to retain nurses in the field.

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