Can someone make a list of all the things.....

  1. you do in Nursing school???

    OK, I realize a list of EVERYTHING would be impossible... but... last night my husband was asking me how much school I have left (3 more pre-reqs before I even apply)... and he said.. well what do you EXACTLY do in nursing school?? I mean it's not like you have courses to take anymore, right??

    And I really didn't know how to explain it (for one, I haven't done it yet, and 2, my explanation wouldn't do it justice)...

    I tried to tell him that we have labs, lectures and clinicals (he thought all we did was clinicals), but I don't know how to explain to him how difficult it is, and how hard it is going to be once I start.

    We have 3 children, 7, 4 and 1 1/2, and he travels 80% of the time for his job. I realize it's a little ways away, but I really feel I should be preparing him for the future.... (he was questioning about day care and everything)....

    So any information you could jot down, I'll copy and email him so he can see how much work it will be....

    Thanks to anyone who can help me out here. I know it's an odd request!
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    About luvmy3kids

    Joined: May '06; Posts: 698; Likes: 229
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    9 Comments

  3. by   TazziRN
    Nursing school is where you start learning all the things you are preparing for now. You cannot learn about disease processes unless you already have a working knowledge of anatomy and microbiology. You will learn to process all the information so that you can know what to expect from the pt in terms of getting worse/better. If you have a pt who suddenly loses his blood pressure and you find out he was given a narcotic just beforehand, you will be able to understand why it happened.
  4. by   ICRN2008
    I will try to give you picture of a typical week in the first half and the last half of my program. (My program in front-loaded).

    Semester 1 (16 credits):
    Fundamentals: discussion 3 hours/week, lab 3 hours/week, lecture 2 hours/week, clinicals 4-5 hours/week
    Health assessment: 2 hours lecture and 3 hours lab per week
    Pathophysiology: 3 hours lecture per week
    Geriatrics: 3 hours lecture per week
    Health promotion: 2 hours lecture per week

    Second semester was similar to the first except that it was more difficult and time-consuming (17 credits). Med-surg was by far the most intensive class in the program. For each lab we usually had a few videos to watch and a few chapters to read. For some classes we had ten chapters or more of reading to do each week. Study time was considerable as well, depending on your background and how well you did in A&P.

    Semester 3 (14 credits):
    Clinicals: 24 hours per week
    Community/public health: 3 hours of lecture per week
    Management and leadership: 3 hours of lecture per week

    Fourth semester is almost identical to the third in terms of workload. There is a considerable amount of writing (at least 2 papers or projects per week in most cases) in addition to all of the clinical time. In addition, there is clinical prep time at home and journals that have to be written each week.

    Each program is different, but this just gives you an example of what it might be like. I started out working 20 or more hours per week, but now I am down to 16 hours every third or fourth weekend. There is a lot of reading, and some people are able to get by without reading everything and still manage to get decent grades.

    Grades are another factor, because those with significant outside commitments do not earn stellar grades from my observation. So, it is up to you to decide how well you want or need to do in nursing school, and where your priorities lie.

    If you have any more questions, please feel free to PM me.
  5. by   KellieNurse06
    Quote from TazziRN
    Nursing school is where you start learning all the things you are preparing for now. You cannot learn about disease processes unless you already have a working knowledge of anatomy and microbiology. You will learn to process all the information so that you can know what to expect from the pt in terms of getting worse/better. If you have a pt who suddenly loses his blood pressure and you find out he was given a narcotic just beforehand, you will be able to understand why it happened.
    Exactly!
    Also..each semester you move onto builds on the information you learned the previous semester........so you are basically just adding onto what you were learning previously but more indepth as you go on.....it can be very difficult or very hard..I think it's what you make it.....don't think you can just slack off by anymeans.....but just keep up on reading and everything..I will be the first one to admit I am not a reader at all..If you find you just can't read the textbooks if they are way too much..get a really good NCLEX book and use that as your reading material..and what I used to do the first two semesters was just really pay attention to the lectures and I made straight B's and did fine. You get what you put into it pretty much...plus if you have a great instructor who can sort of mentor you....you will be a step ahead of it all.....My nursing instructors have been phenomenal and really want us to succeed and they have gone above & beyond in helping us understand things we get tripped up on......plus you may want to try some study groups??? You will also make some really great friends in nusring school too......
    Good luck..and if you want it bad enough you will do fine...:wink2:
  6. by   futurecnm
    I am half way through my first semester in a 2 yr AD nursing school. I had all my generals and pre reqs done before I got it, so I have 8 credits a semester for 4 semesters. I took classes for 2 1/2 hrs to get them all out of the way before nursing school so that is all I have right now. I have to say that no one really has extra classes in my class. This would probably be different than the bachelor's route. It is 8 credits but more like 12 credit workload. In our school we have theory, seminar, and lab/clinical. We have class 2 nights a week and every other weekend. We are just starting clinicals this weekend. So, we spent the first half of this semester learning things in the lab (vital signs, transfers, bed baths, etc) and lots and lots of theory. You will spend time in lecture and in lab doing hands on work. Outside of class you will do lots of reading, note taking, writing papers, group and individual projects and other assignements. We have had one presentation so far (individual) and have a group one coming up next month. We have had 3 or 4 papers due. We also have to do drug cards for each theory test, which can be kind of time consuming. You will be doing care plans when you start clinicals which you have to do the night before. I have yet to do one but we have learned about them. In our program, we have already had 5 tests. So, there is a lot of studying and preparing on top of getting ready for the upcoming lectures. 2 of the tests were things you are expected to learn on your own and aren't covered at all in class (medical terminology and dosage calculations). so, I had to add in time to study for those tests. It is quite time consuming but if you are organized and have good study skills is will go fine. I spend many nights up until midnight because I have 2 kids and that is when I have quiet time alone to study. I rarely have much time during the day.
  7. by   missninaRN
    You will start out with a lot of theory, philosophy of nursing, history of nursing, various developmental theories, etc. You will learn the nursing process, how to assess a patient, how to perform dozens and dozens of skills, and how to write lengthy care plans. You will memorize drugs until you think you are losing your mind. You will learn drug calculations, medical terminology and abbreviations, nutrition, elimination, fluids and electrolytes, and critical thinking. You will take a test every time you turn around. You will learn about tons of different diseases and their processes and pharm. You will spent far more time outside of class reading, writing, and studying than you ever did in prereqs. At some point, probably before you feel ready, you will be set loose in a health care facility and will be required to use everything you have learned to care for a client. You will be expected to observe and take in dozens of different pieces of data all at once and prioritize that data while still always keeping the big picture in mind. You will feel like you are juggling all of your responsibilities (both home and school) at the same time and in danger of dropping the ball at any moment.
    That's all I can tell you about nursing school at this point. I've only been in for 2 months!
  8. by   Pompom
    Give your husband a the college catalog listing all the prereq's and required courses along with clinic hours. Hopefully he will get a clue. This is a professional career and it requires a great deal of education and dedication.
  9. by   Lisa CCU RN
    The sad thing is if you were going to dental, medical, or even law school, he probably wouldn't even have to wonder.
  10. by   luvmy3kids
    Quote from Pompom
    Give your husband a the college catalog listing all the prereq's and required courses along with clinic hours. Hopefully he will get a clue. This is a professional career and it requires a great deal of education and dedication.
    I hope I didn't make him out to sound like an idiot... He's not AT ALL!! He just didn't understand that Nursing school isn't just "clinicals".... He was wondering if I had to register for different classes still or if I was just in the hospital all day.... He is very supportive of me and he does know this is going to be a difficult thing, I just feel like maybe I'm not preparing him for it properly... KWIM???

    I guess I wanted to be able to say.... "we will be doing care plans (and explaing what they are) projects, papers, assessments..... " and what not.... I just don't know exactly what....

    Anyway.. thanks for all of your replies... again, my DH is not a ding-a-ling... I was just hoping to shed some light on the subject.. it's very new to him too..

    Thanks!
  11. by   BlueEyedRN
    good luck
    Last edit by BlueEyedRN on Dec 12, '06

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