Can an LPN train/precept and RN? - page 4

Where I am presently working I seen some practices that I do not think is beneficial. Have you ever have the experience where an LPN train an RN being their preceptor? I beleive LPN are an asset to... Read More

  1. by   diane227
    We have an LPN on our unit that acts a preceptor. She has years of experience and knows everything. I also had an LPN at one time that acted as our preceptor for the trauma orientation in our ED. He too, had loads of experience and the right attitude for the job. I had an EMT that would teach the new staff about Cspine precautions, pre hospital care, etc. My goal was to get them trained right, not worry about the credentials of who is training them.
  2. by   pagandeva2000
    Sadly, I am seeing in this thread and other similar ones that somehow, the competitiveness between nurses comes out. If it is not the educational level, it is the skills, the practice, the oneupmanship that makes us fight to the bitter end. Sometimes, I wonder if it is actually the other end of the spectrum is being proved...that this is a job that anyone can do, but we, ourselves are making this into a bigger deal than it needs to be.

    txspadequeen is correct...maybe this thread is about to go too far.
  3. by   yfloridanurse
    Thanks all for your inputs. I have a great respect for LPN, and for the matter for any person jobs. My questions was not about LPN being good nurses or not, was about being appropiate and provide appropiate training, from the skill standpoint I understand and I seen phlebotomist that will get the vein no matter where. But the discussion was not about bashing LPN, or beggining a fight between LPn and RN. I have always worked in ER or ICU, so LPN for the most part are not in that area, due to the many pushes and cardiac medications and drips, which by their scope they are not allow to do in the state of florida. This is a post operative area even though they call it general surgical most of the patients are pre or post op next day, including bariatric patients, and I was not sure was appropiate. Being the Assistant Nurse Manager for the unit and have not being properly trained, and can of learning as I go, I was looking for more of this is common practice versus the bashing about RN vs LPN.

    I do apprecciate the responses, but to all LPN that responded, do not get mad or be sacarstic about it. My question I think is very valid, because for a reason we all have different boards and different titles behind the name, experience is good and helps, but I was looking more for appropiateness of the practice, to which I have never being exposed to, and I did not get that but bashing. I have very good friends and coworkers that are LPn and I do respect them and their job, but I want to do good for everybody involved.

    Thanks all for your response.
  4. by   Ruby Vee
    Quote from yfloridanurse
    where i am presently working i seen some practices that i do not think is beneficial. have you ever have the experience where an lpn train an rn being their preceptor?
    i beleive lpn are an asset to anunit, and they can be very prepared but their scope of practice differs a lot from the rn as well as being the rn the delegating part to an lpn. what is your opinion in this type of practice?



    decades ago, when i was a brand new nurse, i didn't have a preceptor. i was the first bsn hired in a hospital that had it's own diploma program. quite frankly, i was so ill prepared to work at being a nurse they didn't know what to do with me, and i think i would have failed had not a very wise old lpn (probably younger than i am right now, but she sure seemed old and wise to me when i was 21!) taken me under her wing. yes, her scope of practice was different from mine, but she taught me most of what i know. if you're lucky enough to work with such a person, learn absolutely everything you can from her -- she's worth her weight in gold! as for the things i had to do that the lpns couldn't -- she'd still talk me through them!
  5. by   Ruby Vee
    Quote from classicdame
    regardless of how many differences, there are some and the rn should be precepted to her duties within her scope of practice. question: would you think it ok to have an rn precept a med student?
    i wish i had a dollar for every med student i've precepted. or every intern i've taught how to float a swan, pull a balloon pump, etc.
  6. by   zuzi
    Oh dears is not about SCOPE OF PRACTICE, are just few thinks more to an RN, and the critical thinking and assesment you have it or not, any RN or nurse practitioner could not train you one that...is or not....is your innner side, plus couple pf techniques.
    I seen RNs with 30 years of experience messing a pneumonia with a MIA, loooool, or sending in ER a sore throught after he drank icy tea without any change in VS, loooool, he, he, he, or charge nurses messing them minds around anticoalgulant dosages, or bleeding asses, loooool...please don't tell me about TITLES.
    Is about PEOPLE, minds. If LPN is a good normal mind logical analytical... a phenomenon...you will be blessed to be percept by her instead to a messy mind RN...OMG I told it, I told it..... and I am an RN, looool

    You make me laugh , he, he... find the person first and after look at her title!
    Love you!

    Hey Brian I voted yes, (and I am biased, of course, lol) but you need to change the pool, adding qualifiers for RN and LPN, i told ya, loool
    Last edit by zuzi on May 8, '09
  7. by   pagandeva2000
    Quote from yfloridanurse
    Thanks all for your inputs. I have a great respect for LPN, and for the matter for any person jobs. My questions was not about LPN being good nurses or not, was about being appropiate and provide appropiate training, from the skill standpoint I understand and I seen phlebotomist that will get the vein no matter where. But the discussion was not about bashing LPN, or beggining a fight between LPn and RN. I have always worked in ER or ICU, so LPN for the most part are not in that area, due to the many pushes and cardiac medications and drips, which by their scope they are not allow to do in the state of florida. This is a post operative area even though they call it general surgical most of the patients are pre or post op next day, including bariatric patients, and I was not sure was appropiate. Being the Assistant Nurse Manager for the unit and have not being properly trained, and can of learning as I go, I was looking for more of this is common practice versus the bashing about RN vs LPN.

    I do apprecciate the responses, but to all LPN that responded, do not get mad or be sacarstic about it. My question I think is very valid, because for a reason we all have different boards and different titles behind the name, experience is good and helps, but I was looking more for appropiateness of the practice, to which I have never being exposed to, and I did not get that but bashing. I have very good friends and coworkers that are LPn and I do respect them and their job, but I want to do good for everybody involved.

    Thanks all for your response.
    Your concerns on this topic are valid. I think that the conversation was going smoothly until we (LPNs) were reduced to having a conveyor belt mentality; with no rhyme or reason for what we do. The way things are at this point is 'anything goes'. There does not seem to be any consistency anymore. Nurse satisfaction has decreased, so, people were moving around from facility to facility, so, not many people grew roots. Because of that, we have no choice, sometimes, but to rely on spotty mentors. This is why I say that I will go to the person who has done it most of the time, has survived and wants to teach. Unfortunately, we can't have it all, matching title to title, even if it were better in the long run.
  8. by   NewLynney
    Like most, off the top of my head, I say "no" but it really depends on the setting

    My Masters Trained professor was trained completing her RN preceptorship at Grady (trauma center) Hospital in Atlanta GA, and she is both proud and grateful to say and LPN trained her. Those LPN's often make suggestions of what physicians need to do! They advocate with an excellent command of systems, rationale, outcome and anything else you need to know. Grady is kinda like New York. If you can make it there...

    Finally, do not be discouraged by the credentials a person has, assess (pun intended) their knowledge level. I know an eight-year MA that is smarter, wiser, and more knowledgeable than most RN's. She probes and ferrets out information, diligently studies medications, disease processes, clinical trials, etc. She belongs to several nursing organizations, and applies education in practice and for crying out loud VOLUNTEERS! She chooses, for personal reasons, not to pursue a degree, but I've known her to perform minor emergency surgery in crisis situations and would put my life in her hands in a minute.
  9. by   Nurse_Diane
    Yes, especially since you need to understand what the role of the LPN is.

    However, they should only train you on duties inside their scope of practice (med passes, dressing changes, etc).

    I'm an RN and had a LPN preceptor for a few days. She was fantastic!

    Best,
    Diane
  10. by   pagandeva2000
    Quote from NewLynney
    Like most, off the top of my head, I say "no" but it really depends on the setting

    My Masters Trained professor was trained completing her RN preceptorship at Grady (trauma center) Hospital in Atlanta GA, and she is both proud and grateful to say and LPN trained her. Those LPN's often make suggestions of what physicians need to do! They advocate with an excellent command of systems, rationale, outcome and anything else you need to know. Grady is kinda like New York. If you can make it there...

    Finally, do not be discouraged by the credentials a person has, assess (pun intended) their knowledge level. I know an eight-year MA that is smarter, wiser, and more knowledgeable than most RN's. She probes and ferrets out information, diligently studies medications, disease processes, clinical trials, etc. She belongs to several nursing organizations, and applies education in practice and for crying out loud VOLUNTEERS! She chooses, for personal reasons, not to pursue a degree, but I've known her to perform minor emergency surgery in crisis situations and would put my life in her hands in a minute.
    Quote from Diane-RN in Michigan
    Yes, especially since you need to understand what the role of the LPN is.

    However, they should only train you on duties inside their scope of practice (med passes, dressing changes, etc).

    I'm an RN and had a LPN preceptor for a few days. She was fantastic!

    Best,
    Diane
    I agree, it depends on the setting. I feel that an LPN can teach basic, routine procedures for the most part and if she is advanced in skills, even more. Can't say that we can sign off on compentencies-only a seasoned RN should do that, but sure, we can and we do every day.

    There is a PCA who is excellent in her role that has reminded me of several things-the most recent is how to prepare the exam rooms to be Joint Commission ready at all times. Wrote up a list for me and the entire sha-bang, then says to make sure she does it, too. If she leaves my team, I'm DEAD MEAT.
  11. by   arelle68
    A good experienced LPN is the best professor a new RN will ever have! I was trained by an excellent LPN. I learned more about Nursing than I had ever learned in school in a few short weeks.
  12. by   ChristyRN2009
    In a black and white, surface only no grey area way, no, an LPN should not precept an RN. There are differences in scopes of practice as well as legal responsibility.
    However, I think we can all agree that if there's a coworker who is great at a skill, you should seek out that coworker to learn from them. Period. And there are great LPNs and RNs, and terrible LPNs and RNs. I'll say that many of the nurses in my hospital who are LPNs are just not as focused on critical thinking and assessment skills. Its a function of our state's very limited scope of practice for LPNs. So like another poster said, we may be talking apples and oranges because in my state the limitations are greater.

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