Can a patient fall for a nurse?

  1. This may be a highly subjective question. I want to know your opinions on a patient falling for a nurse. Let's say a male patient who is very ill has a wife who may be in denial about how ill her husband is due to the nature of the illness. He befriends a nurse who understands that situation and tries to be there and provide emotional/professional support. It appears as though the patient has formed a strong bond with the nurse (and vice versa) because she's probably providing something that he may not be getting at home...understanding and compassion. The relationship has become a friendship and has transcended beyond the clinical setting. How likely is it that this relationship could cross over past platonic in the minds of a) the patient or b) the nurse?
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    Joined: Apr '07; Posts: 1

    16 Comments

  3. by   crissrn27
    I would say it would be highly likely, as I have seen this countless times. One place I worked it was like As The World Turns. Nurses marrying/dating/running off with pts all the time. As I sit here I can think of 4 right off the top of my head, 2 that the pt. was married and left wife for the nurse. So, that is my experience with this type of situation.
  4. by   Crux1024
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  5. by   RunnerRN
    Quote from crissrn27
    I would say it would be highly likely, as I have seen this countless times. One place I worked it was like As The World Turns. Nurses marrying/dating/running off with pts all the time. As I sit here I can think of 4 right off the top of my head, 2 that the pt. was married and left wife for the nurse. So, that is my experience with this type of situation.
    I've never even thought of this!! I'd be afraid to have my husband on your floor!!!!
    So how did these relationships end? Are the patients and RNs still together? Does the nurse still have a job?
  6. by   jill48
    Quote from crissrn27
    I would say it would be highly likely, as I have seen this countless times. One place I worked it was like As The World Turns. Nurses marrying/dating/running off with pts all the time. As I sit here I can think of 4 right off the top of my head, 2 that the pt. was married and left wife for the nurse. So, that is my experience with this type of situation.
    Wow. I never knew this stuff really happened.
  7. by   ZootRN
    Patient can fall for a nurse, and it happens all the time. However, I don't know how nurse can fall for a patient. I've seen some cute young males that I would have found interesting otherwise, but what always interferes is that I know too much about them; I've seen them in indecent patient's gown that takes away all dignity from the person; I notice their body odor after missing a night bath, and so on. Ethics aside, those little things just do not inspire at all.
  8. by   HM2VikingRN
    I think it is a real professional boundary that should not be crossed if you want to keep your license and livelihood. (In MN it could be construed as an abuse of power as a professional). I wouldn't do it.
  9. by   Soup Turtle
    The situation you describe doesn't sound like a "love match" to me!

    Maybe the nurse should be helping him communicate better with his wife or referring them both to a counselor. Yuck.
  10. by   TazziRN
    It's no different than pts falling for their doctors, which is more widely known.
  11. by   CHATSDALE
    it is called transference - FOR THE PATIENT

    nurse is needy and stupid
  12. by   miko014
    a) and b)...is this homework or something???

    NO NO NO!!! I think it's putting yourself in a very sticky situation to carry any nurse/pt relationship past hospital walls!

    Also, he's married. 'nuff said.
  13. by   ICRN2008
    It is the role of the nurse to be the one maintaining professional boundaries in the relationship, and this means not taking it outside the clinical setting. Besides being unethical, there is also a strong potential for legal troubles on the part of the nurse and the hospital if the relationship were to end badly.
  14. by   Roy Fokker
    Patients often mistake our compassion, kindness and concern as genuine affection.

    It's been known to happen.

    And as professionals, we need to set and maintain boundaries.


    cheers,

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