California New Grad taking job out of state, what are my chances of getting back to CA?

  1. Hi everyone,

    I just graduated from a BSN program in May. I applied to hundred of jobs and had little luck. I ended up accepting a position into a new grad program at a Regional Medical Center in a small town in Arizona. From what I've heard, it's a great place for new grads. I start next week but I moved out here by myself and am already missing home.

    I would really like to get a job back in San Francisco or at least the Bay Area. I'm planning on applying back around the 8 month mark... depending on how it goes, maybe even as early at 6 months.

    Has anyone moved out of state as a new grad and gotten hired back in the Bay Area? I feel like I jumped the gun on this one but I've seen several of my classmates who spent over a year and a half looking for their first job. I didn't want to wait so long that I wasn't considered a new grad anymore. I figured that in that time of constantly applying to jobs, they could have already gotten their experience and came back. I also didn't want to take a job at a SNF or outpatient setting even if it was in the Bay Area because I'm afraid that it would be too hard to get into the inpatient setting even after a year. So here I am!

    Any insight/experiences would be greatly appreciated!!
    Last edit by Jjdub3 on Oct 13
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    About Jjdub3

    Joined: Jun '18; Posts: 15; Likes: 2

    24 Comments

  3. by   AnnieOaklyRN
    I would say you will need to stay there for at least a year to gain experience, otherwise you will still be considered a "new grad". You will meet new people and get accustomed to the area, and who knows you may end up liking it more then CA.

    Everything is new and you just need to give it time, that feeling of wanting to run back to CA will diminish over time.

    Annie
  4. by   Jedrnurse
    6 mo, 8 mo, no.

    If you're moving for your first job, don't ruin the chance by leaving too early. You'll have a BETTER opportunity of landing something in CA if you stay in AZ for a decent amount of time.
  5. by   Rebekulous
    I agree with the others. Stay a year or two in AZ, and you'll be able to come back as an experienced nurse. Less than that and people won't want to hire you because you haven't hit that "one year" mark.
  6. by   MamaBeaRN2b
    I disagree with these other responses. It can't hurt to start applying after 6 months. If someone will take you, why not? You'll still be a newbie nurse but if you're back home with a support system again, you're probably better off. In the meantime, just focus on work. It's tough the first few months. Gain as much knowledge as you can while you have little else to distract you and come back home as a great nurse!
  7. by   Jedrnurse
    Quote from MamaBeaRN2b
    I disagree with these other responses. It can't hurt to start applying after 6 months. If someone will take you, why not? You'll still be a newbie nurse but if you're back home with a support system again, you're probably better off. In the meantime, just focus on work. It's tough the first few months. Gain as much knowledge as you can while you have little else to distract you and come back home as a great nurse!
    So...
    absolutely no consideration for the hospital that hired the brand new nurse and invested the training/orientation resources? I understand the prevalent rationalization against showing any loyalty, i.e. "they'd fire you in a heartbeat", but barely starting work and already planning an early out strategy?

    Doesn't sit right.
  8. by   Sour Lemon
    Quote from Jedrnurse
    So...
    absolutely no consideration for the hospital that hired the brand new nurse and invested the training/orientation resources? I understand the prevalent rationalization against showing any loyalty, i.e. "they'd fire you in a heartbeat", but barely starting work and already planning an early out strategy?

    Doesn't sit right.
    No hospital hires new nurses because they want to help develop their careers and have the nurses' best interests at heart. They hire new nurses because they need nurses.

    An employer wouldn't hesitate to let a new nurse (or an old one) go if they no longer needed the nurse. I've seen it happen more than a few times. No one in management would so much as sniffle at the thought that the nurse moved out of state for the job ...or turned down ten other offers. If they no longer need you, you're gone.

    I'd stay a few years for my own sake, but never for any employer's. If they want me to stay a few years for their sake, they need to entice me to do so.
  9. by   LibraNurse27
    I am from the Bay Area and was also having trouble finding a job so went to Arkansas. Honestly I would have taken a SNF job but I didn't really know what that was... so uninformed! The program had great classes for new grads but the time with my preceptor was mostly spent trying to help her with the extremely unmanageable patient loads (up to 7 very unstable patients on day shift and 9 on nights). After 7 months I was so burned out and homesick that I took a job back home in an outpatient clinic, worked there for 3 years and loved it and have worked inpatient acute care for past 2 years. It will all work out! 6 months may be enough experience to start applying in the Bay. I had to pay back the cost of my training to the hospital in AR but it seemed only fair. The experience of working there really made be appreciate CA's legalized ratios and I really admire nurses in other states who work with such tough ratios. It's not safe or fair and I hope it is changing. Good luck! I hope the ratios in Arizona are more manageable and that you can come home soon.
  10. by   Jjdub3
    Annie - I agree, everyone here is telling me that I probably won't leave lol. Thanks for the encouragement!
  11. by   Jjdub3
    Quote from Jedrnurse
    6 mo, 8 mo, no.

    If you're moving for your first job, don't ruin the chance by leaving too early. You'll have a BETTER opportunity of landing something in CA if you stay in AZ for a decent amount of time.

    Right, I wouldn't leave without having a job offer
  12. by   Jjdub3
    I'm not planning an early out, I'm planning for my career. I actually interviewed at another regional medical center where the managers straight out said that they have a very high turnover rate because they KNOW that new grads are coming to these areas for experience and applying back in their home cities. It's very prevalent in California. It's not that new grads are unable to show loyalty, but that they want to work in their hometowns/cities, not hours and hours away from all family and friends. Sounds like this is not the case in Massachusetts.
  13. by   Jjdub3
    Thanks for sharing your experience!! I'm a little nervous to accept an outpatient job. Did you have a hard time getting hired inpatient after 3 years of outpatient work?
  14. by   LibraNurse27
    I still had kind of a hard time but not nearly as hard as when I was a new grad. Feel free to PM me if you would like to know about the hospital where I work. They hire a lot of new grads and RNs with minimal experience. =)

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