Bite Release Pressure Point

  1. My friend is a nurse and she has told me that she heard about a bite release pressure point just below the septum. Has anyone heard of this and do you know if it works/is it appropriate? Why I need to know this is a long story...but I need a good bite release technique. Thanks!
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    Joined: Mar '13; Posts: 12

    25 Comments

  3. by   Morainey
  4. by   Altra
    The following release technique is taught in CPI/Nonviolent Crisis Intervention training: lean into the bite(r), then apply pressure underneath the septum. I have seen this work. Also taught is that a "tickle" in the same area will also release the jaw enough to release the bite.

    Be safe!
  5. by   twinmommy+2
    If you take your finger and rub it hard back and forth, like you're pretending to make a mustache across their upper lip then rub it hard back and forth. You won't break anything and it makes them back off.

    Not one I'd recommend on the job but as self defense, rub your fingers across the grease of your forehead and then into their eyes, or even press against their eyeballs. Definitely not for use during patient care though.
  6. by   RNsRWe
    Quote from twinmommy+2
    Not one I'd recommend on the job but as self defense, rub your fingers across the grease of your forehead and then into their eyes, or even press against their eyeballs. Definitely not for use during patient care though.
    Smiled when reading this....let's face it, we're WAY beyond usual "patient care" if we're talking about methods of releasing someone's bite from a part of someone else's anatomy!
  7. by   elkpark
    Quote from RNsRWe
    Smiled when reading this....let's face it, we're WAY beyond usual "patient care" if we're talking about methods of releasing someone's bite from a part of someone else's anatomy!
    Yes, it's an amusing thought, but the reality is that, in psych, at least, we are obligated to not hurt the client while attempting to protect/rescue ourselves and colleagues from clients. You can face criminal charges if you do.
  8. by   marydc
    Quote from Altra
    The following release technique is taught in CPI/Nonviolent Crisis Intervention training: lean into the bite(r), then apply pressure underneath the septum. I have seen this work. Also taught is that a "tickle" in the same area will also release the jaw enough to release the bite.

    Be safe!
    I was with one co worker who was bit and instinctively pulled her arm out of the bite. There was a lot of damage, requiring surgery and physical therapy. A few years later another co worker was bit and leaned into the bite. She ended up with terrible bruising and swelling but the skin wasn't even broken.
  9. by   RNewbie
    Quote from marydc

    I was with one co worker who was bit and instinctively pulled her arm out of the bite. There was a lot of damage, requiring surgery and physical therapy. A few years later another co worker was bit and leaned into the bite. She ended up with terrible bruising and swelling but the skin wasn't even broken.
    Where do u guys work where patients are biting?
  10. by   ChristineN
    Quote from RNewbie

    Where do u guys work where patients are biting?
    In my first year as a nurse I got bitten by a psych pt that had pica so the pt loved putting everything in her mouth, including my hand (which I got to close when I was trying to pull something out of her mouth she was aspirating on). It took at least 5 min for co-workers to get my arm out, as the pt had an old trach hole that had not closed up, so when we clamped off her nose she just kept breathing through her neck. I was fortunate that I was wearing a sweater and while it did break skin was not severe enough to need stitches. Some of my co-workers weren't as lucky
  11. by   Sadala
    So sorry OP! A psych pt once bit me on the forearm and it was a good ten minutes before we could get her to release. I had a perfect set of teeth in the form of a scar on my arm for over two years. It's been gone for a good many years now though I could have used a good bite release technique back then!
  12. by   xoemmylouox
    It's crazy.. I've had many try to bite, but so far none have gotten me (knock on wood). The things we have to deal with...
  13. by   SaoirseRN
    I've been bitten. A mouth full of teeth on my forearm. I did the push toward the mouth thing and it worked, he released, but I pushed hard. I was quick enough that he did not break the skin thankfully.
  14. by   RNsRWe
    Quote from elkpark
    Yes, it's an amusing thought, but the reality is that, in psych, at least, we are obligated to not hurt the client while attempting to protect/rescue ourselves and colleagues from clients. You can face criminal charges if you do.
    Very good point. Guess I was thinking more along the lines of ER, or the occasional NON-certifiable nutjob in med-surg.

    Glad I don't work in an environment where I'm likely to get bitten! However, I certainly have had young patients coming out of a Propofol sleep who wake up swinging.....that's not pretty.

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