Become a Nurse But Don't Work As One

  1. I'm very interested in gaining the knowledge and degree of nursing, but I'd rather work on the administrative side of healthcare instead of the patient care side. Is it feasible to attend nursing school, pass the boards and then pursue more of an admin or office-setting type job? I haven't applied to nursing school yet so I'm trying to make sure I'm approaching this the right way. Thanks.
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  2. Visit Stargate Atlantis profile page

    About Stargate Atlantis

    Joined: Mar '16; Posts: 13; Likes: 19

    43 Comments

  3. by   roser13
    Nursing school only teaches a fraction of the necessary knowledge. Experience teaches the rest.

    Practicing nursing under an administrator with no on the ground experience is most nurses' nightmares.
  4. by   OCNRN63
    Nope.
  5. by   dishes
    Most nurses would work in direct patient care for a few of years before moving towards an administrative role. What kind of 'office setting type job' do you envision? Doctors office, clinic, telehealth?
  6. by   Penelope_Pitstop
  7. by   TheCommuter
    In most cases you'll need several years of hands-on patient care experience as a floor nurse before you'd become qualified for administrative nursing positions (e.g. nurse executive, chief nursing officer, assistant director of nursing services).

    How would you be able to effectually lead a team of bedside nurses in the clinical setting if you have never walked a mile in their shoes?
  8. by   Nurse Leigh
    Quote from TheCommuter
    In most cases you'll need several years of hands-on patient care experience as a floor nurse before you'd become qualified for administrative nursing positions (e.g. nurse executive, chief nursing officer, assistant director of nursing services).

    How would you be able to effectually lead a team of bedside nurses in the clinical setting if you have never walked a mile in their shoes?
    And even if you *did* manage to find a job, you'd be hard pressed to garner *any* respect from the nurses in direct-patient care positions.
  9. by   flying_ace2
    I can't speak to the administrative side of things, but it is absolutely possible to get your BSN/ASN and work in an office setting if that is what interests you. I only worked in acute care for a year and a few months, and then transitioned into the pharma industry where I'm in an office with no face to face patient contact at all (I do still talk to patients and providers by phone all day however). I really enjoy my work and find it interesting, and I plan on staying here for the foreseeable future!
  10. by   Stargate Atlantis
    Quote from flying_ace2
    I can't speak to the administrative side of things, but it is absolutely possible to get your BSN/ASN and work in an office setting if that is what interests you. I only worked in acute care for a year and a few months, and then transitioned into the pharma industry where I'm in an office with no face to face patient contact at all (I do still talk to patients and providers by phone all day however). I really enjoy my work and find it interesting, and I plan on staying here for the foreseeable future!
    Thanks. That's the kind of setting I was thinking of!
  11. by   MedChica
    Quote from roser13
    Nursing school only teaches a fraction of the necessary knowledge. Experience teaches the rest.

    Practicing nursing under an administrator with no on the ground experience is most nurses' nightmares.
    Requoted for emphasis. Thank you, madame.
  12. by   fibroblast
    You can always work PRN as a nurse and work in the administrative side. That is what I plan to do.
  13. by   nutella
    Quote from fibroblast
    You can always work PRN as a nurse and work in the administrative side. That is what I plan to do.
    why bother with nursing school if you actually just want to go into administration??
  14. by   luvsltcrn
    Quote from DeLanaHarvickWannabe
    This was going to be my suggestion as well.

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