Anatomy Question!


  1. Or in other words, how is this possible? A gynecologist was explaining post op vaginal hysterectomy in which the cervix is removed. He said that our (ladies) intestines, bladder, bowel, the entire lower abdominal organs are only supported by a thin wall of SKIN!!!!! Now, I understand this site is rated "PG" but we have all had anatomy. I'm a little creeped out by this.

    What happens as you get older ? Or gain any weight? What is the liklihood that you would need bladder support, how is sex even possible? I would be too worried about a rupture and my intestines prolapsing. Ugh, anyone had this done? Any insight? As usual, thanks for your replies.
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    About Haunted

    Joined: Oct '01; Posts: 531; Likes: 85
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    8 Comments

  3. by   Altra
    Prolapse is a known problem in elderly women ... not an everyday occurrence, but not uncommon either. Remember, you're talking about organs in two different cavities - abdominal & pelvic.

    As far as the anatomy of sexual intercourse ... I'm going to paraphrase what I once heard a OB/GYN say to a father-to-be who was concerned he would "hurt the baby." ... "Don't flatter yourself!"

    In other words, to the best of my knowledge, sexual intercourse does not pose a risk to female internal organs.
  4. by   Haunted
    I'm laughing, your quote was great! Still I wonder how many women have gone thru this...
  5. by   MS._Jen_RN
    Quote from Haunted
    Or in other words, how is this possible? A gynecologist was explaining post op vaginal hysterectomy in which the cervix is removed. He said that our (ladies) intestines, bladder, bowel, the entire lower abdominal organs are only supported by a thin wall of SKIN!!!!! Now, I understand this site is rated "PG" but we have all had anatomy. I'm a little creeped out by this.

    What happens as you get older ? Or gain any weight? What is the liklihood that you would need bladder support, how is sex even possible? I would be too worried about a rupture and my intestines prolapsing. Ugh, anyone had this done? Any insight? As usual, thanks for your replies.
    Prolapse is a known and not terribly uncommon occurance. I work with a lot of older ladies and have seen several. Some mild, some not so mild. There are surgeries called suspensions that will fix the issue at least temporarily. There are intravaginal supports called pesaries (sp?) that help with a vaginally prolapsed bladder etc. Sex is still possible, you just have to turn the now "outie" back into an "innie" Oh, the joys of aging that we will all experience.:icon_roll
    ~Jen
  6. by   midcom
    Three years ago I was told by my GYN that I needed a hysterectomy due to a tumor found during an ultrasound for something else. He was convinced it was ovarian cancer. I was shocked & confused. This was before I even considered going to nursing school. He went on to explain just what he'd be removing & in my confusion, I went back over what he told me ( or tried to ) & attemppted to restate just what he'd remove. I said, uterus, ovaries, fallopian tubes & vagina. Obviously I meant "cervix" He gave me a very strange look & said, "That'd be no fun at all." Dang man! Is that all they think about?

    I don't know about it being held together by just skin, but my hysterectomy greatly improved my incontinience problem, probably because the tumor was pressing on the bladder. By the way, it was benign. However, the problem came back within 2 years (no, not a prolapse) & I had a TVT done last Dec. Everything is nice & secure. Not falling out or anything. (& I can cough without tinkling)
    Dixie
  7. by   miko014
    Well, it has been awhile, so I don't remember specifics. But There's a whole system of support in there (ligaments, muscles, tendons)...if not, how could women run marathons, or dance, or move at all? I remember that the detrussor (sp) muscle supports the bladder...and what good would those kegel (another sp!) exercises be if there was no muscle in there?? And the greater and/or lesser omentum kinda wrap around the colon...that's gotta provide some support. I mean, our organs aren't just floating around in there! What about the peritneum (parietal and visceral)? They help too. Wish I could remember more anatomy, that's scary! And what about pregnant women? If it was all in there only with skin, wouldn't the baby be too heavy??? Yikes!

    And if you think about it, a uterus is just a pouch on the end of a tube (vagina). It can get turned inside out (=prolapse)...I know that women who have had lots of kids have a higher risk for prolapse (I think I got that in a lecture one time). Maybe stuff gets too stretched out and causes it? But then again, I guess it also depends on what they take out of you in surgery!
    Last edit by miko014 on Nov 1, '06
  8. by   jill48
    I had an oopherectomy (ovary removed) due to a cyst. A year later they went in and took the other one. WHen I asked if he was going to take out the uterus also, he said it would be better to leave it in to "hold everything in place". Well the following year they had to take out the uterus too. And i'm only 33. So in answer to your question, if my doctor suggested that keeping the uterus would hold everything in place, then i would assume that losing the uterus means things are no longer held in place. Was that confusing? Sorry, it's late.
  9. by   NoMoreStudying
    Remember, everything isn't just sitting on top of that tissue. Everything is also connected from the sides. Think of surgery and everything thing they have to get through just to get to the organ in question.

    Humor me, but I keep thinking of the commercial with the wet paper towel and the bowling ball.
  10. by   tulip_aron
    The structure which you describe as "skin" is anatomically and scientifically known as mesometrium / broad ligament and supports the pelvic and abdominal organs to a great extent. It tends to loose it's natural support under some extreme conditions such as multiple pregnancies, abdominal surgeries, chronic constipation, obesity or straining.......let us say when you put lot of pressure on the ligament. Hence we can avoid Uterine prolapse by avoiding the above said conditions to the possible extent and stay healthy. Don't worry as our body got enough mechanisms to withhold the internal organs........:wakeneo:

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