Anatomy of a Code - page 4

You're standing at your computer, charting on your patients. The end of the shift is nearing, and you really want to get this done so that you can get home. As you are typing, you hear a loud... Read More

  1. by   thenightnurse456
    Quote from VANurse2010
    PIV infections are pretty rare. However, this really has more to do with medical professionals being far more exposed to liability in the US than they are in other countries.
    I agree, I think it's more of the US population loving to sue. Putting a PIVC in everyone makes sure everyone's protected.

    I also noticed from reading these threads that the US administers a lot more medication through the intravenous route. Ie: pain medication seems to almost always been given through an IV where as that is very rare in my country (especially on a floor).
  2. by   VANurse2010
    Quote from thenightnurse456
    I agree, I think it's more of the US population loving to sue. Putting a PIVC in everyone makes sure everyone's protected.

    I also noticed from reading these threads that the US administers a lot more medication through the intravenous route. Ie: pain medication seems to almost always been given through an IV where as that is very rare in my country (especially on a floor).
    This is because a big component of patient satisfaction scores, and thus reimbursement, is tied to satisfaction with pain control.
  3. by   thenightnurse456
    Quote from VANurse2010
    This is because a big component of patient satisfaction scores, and thus reimbursement, is tied to satisfaction with pain control.
    Very interesting! And of course IV morphine will work faster then subcutaneous. Meaning the customer is satisfied in a timely manner and less likely to complain in the survey.

    Interesting.
  4. by   VANurse2010
    Quote from thenightnurse456
    Very interesting! And of course IV morphine will work faster then subcutaneous. Meaning the customer is satisfied in a timely manner and less likely to complain in the survey.

    Interesting.
    Narcotic abusers get surveys, too, in addition to "regular" folks.

    I would also add that my opinion is also colored by the fact that I worked on a cardiac focused floor where chest pain and CHF exacerbations were two of the most common diagnoses. In either case, IV access is important for administering IV morphine (for chest pain) or IV diuresis. Hospital physicians write medication orders with the assumption that the patient has IV access. I am more comfortable with access-free patients if they have a specific order stating that it is OK to leave them without it.
  5. by   ReadyToListen
    Very helpful, thank you for sharing!
  6. by   needluck
    Very well written..have to say..my heart is racing now!!!
  7. by   emtpbill
    Now imagine all of this being done by you alone. With an earthquake rocking the room back and forth, now you know what it's like to be a medic working a code in the back of a moving ambulance.

    Great story though. Well written!
  8. by   CardiacDork
    I don't cry. I feel a little nutty and left out lol.
  9. by   yarahjay
    It sounds really us... Very well written...
  10. by   X-ray Lady
    The one group you forgot to mention is the X-ray Technologist. I am waiting by the door with my portable x-ray machine. Waiting to hear the doctor mention, Let's get a Chest X-ray for tube position. Now all the nurses and other staff try to leave the room as the portable is wheeled in. Can't get close enough because the "Code Cart" is in the way. Move the cart, give the Resp. Tech. a lead apron. Try to lift or roll the patient to get the x-ray plate under him. No help, everyone is afraid to come back in until I leave. R. T. helps lift and stabilize the breathing tube. People are asking me to hurry, I know the patient needs more everything, just another 30 seconds. X-RAY!!!! Leave NOW! Ok, image is good, doctor is looking at the digital image, tube is not low enough, damn. Respiratory repositions the tube, good thing we left the plate in place, all the staff is back in the room assisting the patient, taping IV lines, giving medications, and I am in the way with my great big machine. Yes, I will leave as soon as the doctor is happy with the tube placement. Time for the next Chest X-ray. X-RAY!!! Leave Now! I am done. Come on back in, doctor is happy with the placement. The tube is taped in place. We roll the patient to get out the plate as the code continues around me. I take my Portable X-ray machine and lead apron out in the hall. I say a prayer as I wipe down my equipment. Dear Lord, I know this person's life is in your hands. Your will be done. Amen.
  11. by   midwestvintage
    Over 36 years I have been in hundreds of codes and love a well run one. I have been in some that were horrible, doctors screaming and missing supplies to ones that almost seemed like a demostration on how to run perfect code, everyone know exactly what to do and when. Have to say I always loved codes. Now in my new department we rarely if ever see one and I do miss the rush. Great description of a well run code. By the way, we aren't allowed to draw from an established IV either, gives false lab results.
  12. by   Jan.mc
    Pretty accurate. Unfortunately we don't always find out the cause of a code as fast as these people did. Excellently writing.
  13. by   GaleSRN
    Just about sums it up. Well written. I have been through more codes than I can remember. The ones I do remember were in the ER...babies, police officers, teenagers in motor vehicle accidents on Prom night and a close friend. Those are my nightmares.

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