Ana

  1. Are you a member of ANA? Why or why not?
    Why should a new grad consider joining ANA?
  2. Visit SillyStudent profile page

    About SillyStudent

    Joined: Jan '05; Posts: 290; Likes: 314
    EP RN; from US
    Specialty: 8 year(s) of experience in ER/ICU, CCL, EP

    7 Comments

  3. by   IMustBeCrazy
    Quote from SillyStudent
    Are you a member of ANA? Why or why not?
    Why should a new grad consider joining ANA?
    1. No

    2. I haven't seen a compelling reason to join. They seem to be their own best enemy, for example in proposals that seek to divide rather than bring together nurses from all backgrounds, from Diploma to ADN to BSN and beyond. In addition, I don't see them pushing for mandated ratios, which is the #1 bane of nurses working today, causing high turnover and burnout within the profession. IMHO, it's a sad day when a state nursing association (California) has more momentum than a national organization. It is my *opinion* that they are more concerned with making nice with the national medical/hospital "franchises" than backing solutions relevant to the current nursing crisis.

    3. I can't endorse this organization at this time.
  4. by   James Huffman
    Used to be a member. In fact, I was president of the local chapter for a year.

    But I quit. Because for whatever reason, the ANA is an elitist group (at least it was here) consisting of mostly professors and a few administrators. Not that there's anything wrong with either of those specialties, but the ANA doesn't represent the average nurse.

    So when the ANA claims to speak for all nurses, it's a little unrealistic. I appreciate some of the stuff they do, and I use some of their products, but I don't pretend that they represent anything more than their membership.
  5. by   MichaelFloridaRN
    I am not a member.

    I would join if they represented nurses, which I believe they do not As already stated above, the single most important issue, a nurse to patient ratio standard, is being largely ignored by them.

    I would not recommend joining them. I would let them know in a letter of why not, which I did, and as expected never received an answer.
  6. by   SillyStudent
    Is the 'safe staffing saves lives' thing just something to keep nurses off of their backs?
  7. by   PsychNurseWannaBe
    I can't figure out the ANA. I think it is sad that we are the largest of healthcare professionals and yet we don't have jack for a voice. I mean if we were all part of the ANA and the ANA did what we wanted...what a powerful force we could have. Do you think if many of us joined that they would do what we wanted...or do you think they would still only work on their agenda?

    I wished we could get together more because we have the numbers and I think we could do some great lobbying for our profession...but the ANA would have to agree to listen to us. It just makes me sick that every doctor is a member of the AMA and they have many lobbyists and are very powerful...while we nurses sit back and get kicked around. The minute we try to go for a power play, we don't have the numbers. We are at the mercy of other associations because we can't get our stuff together. For example I read an article in school about what the AMA was able to do when it exerted it influences on nursing.

    The other problem we have is nurses are so overworked, tired, burnout, that we kinda go after each other... for example... LPN vs RN... ADN vs BSN. I am sure that other organizations just love this because while we bicker with each other... we don't focus on other things. Sometimes I think other organizations do this purposely. Tick of the nursing profession...get them riled up and watch while we divide and conquer each other. That's my
  8. by   Penguin67
    1. Yes, I have been a member of ANA and my state/local affiliation since I graduated from nursing school in 1989. I do a monthly check draft, that is now less than a tank of gas per month.

    2. I think that my involvement in the local and state student nurse association fostered my interest in the organization, and made me realize the importance of being a member. I have met many nurses who live in different parts of the country as a result of being a member. I've also been able to keep up with political agendas nationwide regarding healthcare. I'm not thrilled that they endorse a Presidential candidate, as it has not always been who I would vote for, but I realize the endorsement came as a result of the democratic process within the ANA. I've seen leadership potential being developed from new nurses in local and state chapters, as a result of membership. Recently, a bedside nurse Cindy Balkstra, was elected as President of the Georgia Nurses Association. That showed me that it is not the elitist organization that others stereotypically categorize it as, and that leadership from staff nurses is considered important. Furthermore, Cindy was living in Savannah at the time, and was running against a very well known nurse from the Atlanta area, who I think was a nurse educator. Through proper use of campaigning and the political process, and strong grassroots efforts, she won the election. There are alot of membership benefits, both statewide and nationally that ANA members receive. The one that I like the best is the huge discount on renewing my ANCC certification.

    3. I'd encourage a new grad to join the ANA, and get active in local and state activities, and travel to the national conventions. Get out there, mix and mingle and meet others. Realize that your profession exists beyond the bedside and that your involvement makes a difference. Read the literature that is sent from the organization, volunteer to serve on committees and help the organization in the best way that your talents can offer. I call it servant leadership to the profession. The contacts that you make today could be helpful to you in the future. I met several advanced practice nurses in local meetings, and was able to use their expertise to help me get clinicals set up for the MSN program. Sure, I don't always agree with everything that ANA endorses, but if I had to agree with everything that a professional organization said or did, I wouldn't join anything! The people in charge represent the organization, so elect your officers carefully.

    **I know that this was long, and I hope that I in no way was disrespectful to the opposite opinions expressed in earlier posts.
  9. by   Bugpie
    Quote from Penguin67
    Sure, I don't always agree with everything that ANA endorses, but if I had to agree with everything that a professional organization said or did, I wouldn't join anything! The people in charge represent the organization, so elect your officers carefully.

    **I know that this was long, and I hope that I in no way was disrespectful to the opposite opinions expressed in earlier posts.

    Thank you for sharing your insight. I feel I must agree - and I look forward to becoming a part of the process as a member of the ANA and my state NA. I do hope that others will join - I know many nurses whose wisdom and expertise are invaluable to me - taking leadership positions can only benefit all those who seek to participate in shaping the future of nursing.

    Have a blessed day!

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