Accelerated degree programs

  1. I am considering getting my degree through a one year accelerated nursing program for people who have degrees in another subject. My degree is in Computer science.

    Are there any nurses who received their degree through an accelerated program. If so, how many people dropped the program? Would you recommend it?
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    27 Comments

  3. by   Kyriaka
    I am weighing the accelerated program vs. the regular in the Fall.

    If you go into the accelerated but want to just do the regular pace later, you can change your mind.

    See if that is an option.
  4. by   PJMommy
    I received by BSN through a 1-year accelerated program. It is a very intense year but do-able. Out of 50-some in the class, two dropped voluntarily and one was dropped for grades.

    I can't tell you whether I recommend it or not. It worked well for me because I didn't want to spend 2 or 3 years in school. I was very focused on my goal and the year flew by (it actually amounted to closer to 11 months). However, for some people, they'd rather work part or full-time and go to school full-time in a traditional program. Accelerated only works well for people who are focused, have excellent time management skills, and are willing to bust their butt for a year. I was at class or clinicals for 7-8 hours a day and then studied 3-4 weeknights each week and usually a good 8-10 hours on the weekend. Laundry piled up, lightbulbs stayed burnt out, the refridgerator was never cleaned, I nutured tremendous dust bunnies under the bed, etc. But, given the choice, I'd do it again because one year goes by so quickly that it is amazing.
  5. by   bellarosa
    I'm in an accelerated program right now at UT Houston. The program has 10 students at UT Houston and 10 at UTMB in Galveston. We are going to graduate in May. One person dropped out during the first 2 weeks.
    I recommend accelerated programs if you are motivated and can work at a fast pace. The program I am in has most of our classes online. We do not go to lecture. We do attend labs, seminars, and clinicals in the Texas Medical Center. I think it is a great way to become a nurse fast if you already have a degree.
  6. by   Kyriaka
    On a side note, I am very worried about changing careers to nursing.

    I come from a sales background in a dog-eat dog environment (which I loved). I also was management.

    Sometimes reading many of the postings, I realize that I will not fit in with the "average" nursing environment (if this forum is to be the judge).

    There seems to be the idea that you have an obligation to other nurses first.

    I have always believed that my first duty is to my employer. Period. Not to my co workers. And in the case of nursing, to my patients and employer. My co workers should be last.

    I am very anti-union and will never join a nurses union. And you bet I would cross a picket line in a second to care for a patient.

    In the business world, to advance, you work 10 hours extra a week without pay if you have to. You just do it. This seems to be looked down on in nursing.

    I dont believe in bonuses for everyone. You give the top performers incentive for over acheivment, but not everyone. And I dont believe pay raises should be a given.

    I love medicine, but dont know that if I will be able to tolerate the environment. It seems to be very differant mindset than the business world that I am coming from.

    I plan to get my masters in Bioethics and teach at the University level (but not to teach nursing).
    Last edit by Kyriaka on Feb 24, '05
  7. by   sunnyjohn
    Sounds to me like you might fit in perfectly...... Don't worry...

    Agape
  8. by   nosonew
    I am not aware of any one year, accellerated programs for nursing if you aren't already a nurse via ADN.

    I am doing an accellerated BSN after being an ADN nurse for 13 years. All of my classes are on-line and I do local clinicals...
  9. by   sunnyjohn
    Actually there are lots of accelerated programs for people who have a Bachelors degree in another field

    http://www.aacn.nche.edu/Publications/issues/Aug02.htm
    Changing Gears: Second-Degree Students

    The typical second-degree nursing student is motivated, older, and has higher academic expectations than high school-entry baccalaureate students. Accelerated students excel in class and are eager to gain clinical experiences. Faculty find them to be excellent learners who are not afraid to challenge their instructors.

    "Our accelerated students are a remarkable group," said Nancy DeBasio, PhD, RN, Dean of the Research College of Nursing in Kansas City. "Their mean GPA is 3.3, they come from a wide array of backgrounds, and the experiences they bring with them enrich their nursing." The compressed program format is a key motivator for this group of students. "Our exit surveys indicate that the one-year program completion time is a primary reason for enrollment in our program," Dr. Debasio explained.

    Second-degree students bring new dimensions to nursing and a rich history of prior learning. "We are seeing a steady increase in applicants to our accelerated program this year, and those accepted come with backgrounds that are varied and impressive," said Janet B. Younger, PhD, RN, Associate Dean of the School of Nursing at Virginia Commonwealth University. "We welcomed several PhDs, some MDs from other countries, and a few fine arts majors. These students excel in class and perform very well post-graduation."

    Students in accelerated programs are competitive, maintain high grade point averages, and almost always pass the NCLEX-RN licensure exam on the first attempt. "Second-degree candidates are excellent students and are very likely to see the program through to graduation," said Afaf Meleis, PhD, RN, FAAN, Dean of the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing. "These students are committed to their studies, are actively engaged in research, and very often involved in university organizations."

    Susan M. Di Biase, CRNP, MSN, a faculty member at Jacksonville State University in Alabama, knows a thing or two about second-degree students. She was one. "As a nurse educator, I have taught dozens of second-degree students who often distinguish themselves as class leaders," explained Di Biase. "When I was taking classes, I thought the students were strong academically and many said nursing was harder than their first degree. My first employer made a custom of hiring second-degree students because she thought they were good thinkers and strong patient advocates."
  10. by   Kyriaka
    Sunny,

    Thank you for your response.

    Also, working in sales I am coming from a male dominated field.

    I guess I have just gotten the impression from this forum that the mindset is so differant.
  11. by   sunnyjohn
    Sales people are "go-getters". They are tough folks who are willing to go the extra mile to get the job done. They are not shy and afraid to "push" for that sale.

    I think this will make you an excellent nurse. What better qualities for a patient advocate. I am sure most of the nurses here will tell you that in addition to being caring, they have to be tough to get the job done.


    Remember alot of the folks come here to vent their frustrations. They are great folks who love the profession, but just need to let it out in a safe place.

    Again you will do great....

    Agape
  12. by   Quickbeam
    I'm a career changer who went to a one year accelerated BSN program almost 20 years ago. Back when there were only 5 programs in the US!

    I loved it and it worked well for me. I was a self supporting adult for whom the opportunity costs of being out of work were very high. My program (Creighton) was wonderful...took excellent care of the accelerated students and gave us clinical choices I've never known anyone else to have. Just shy of 12 months after starting the program, I was employed again.

    I do not recommend doing an accelerated program if you have a lot of other balls in the air. It takes a tremendous amount of focus. My class lost 2 people due to pregnancy, 2 others over family obligations and one because her English just wasn't good enough. There is no slowing down, and no excuses for missing work. A professor of mine called it a "no stumbles" program. There is no room for error.

    Accelerated programs are wonderful if you can devote yourself to it 100%. I have no regrets.
  13. by   NurseFirst
    Quote from Kyriaka
    On a side note, I am very worried about changing careers to nursing.

    I come from a sales background in a dog-eat dog environment (which I loved). I also was management.

    Sometimes reading many of the postings, I realize that I will not fit in with the "average" nursing environment (if this forum is to be the judge).

    There seems to be the idea that you have an obligation to other nurses first.

    I have always believed that my first duty is to my employer. Period. Not to my co workers. And in the case of nursing, to my patients and employer. My co workers should be last.

    I am very anti-union and will never join a nurses union. And you bet I would cross a picket line in a second to care for a patient.

    In the business world, to advance, you work 10 hours extra a week without pay if you have to. You just do it. This seems to be looked down on in nursing.

    I dont believe in bonuses for everyone. You give the top performers incentive for over acheivment, but not everyone. And I dont believe pay raises should be a given.

    I love medicine, but dont know that if I will be able to tolerate the environment. It seems to be very differant mindset than the business world that I am coming from.

    I plan to get my masters in Bioethics and teach at the University level (but not to teach nursing).
    I think it might be more like policemen. When you are on the streets (wards) you need the help and support of your fellow nurses to get the job done, whether it is turning a 400# pt or helping give that same pt a bedbath, inserting an NG tube, taking breaks.

    There also isn't the same stratification of pay for nurses as there is in the business world. In the biz world, a lot has to do with your negotiating skills; I think this is less true in nursing (but I am still a student; just my perception--I was in the hi tech industry for 20 years). Perhaps you'd like being a detail person better (pharmaceutical rep)? Some of these folks make more than the MDs they sell to.

    I'm really curious: why do you think you want to go into nursing? You can certainly get the education (usually in philosophy) to teach bioethics at the university level. You will likely, however, almost always be an instructor, as most professors have to be Ph.D.s. Why do you want to take such a step-down in pay? (In either nursing or teaching.)

    NurseFirst
    Last edit by NurseFirst on Feb 24, '05
  14. by   Kyriaka
    sunny,

    The sales enviroment is very go get. We dont step on other sales people, but we are used to no gimme's either.

    We do not expect our employer to always pay us...if you dont perform, you dont get a pay check. If you over perform, you are compensated.

    I dont believe you should get extra pay for holidays. A day is a day. A dollar is a dollar no matter what man made "holidays" are invented.

    It is sink or swim. If you dont excel, then you are out of a job. There is no dead weight in the sales department.

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