Absolutely FURIOUS!!!! - page 7

Hey, guys, I need some serious calming down. A lot of y'all remember the thread "All is not well in the kingdom", where I talked about the horrible job and subsequent termination I had had. I... Read More

  1. by   BmichelleRN
    I agree that you potentially have a lawsuit. I worked for a facility that was anal about legal culpability and they said we could never give a reference without 1. written permission from the past employee and 2. that they would only reveal dates worked, as any other information regarding performance, attendance etc, at least in VA, was a violation of law.
  2. by   nursemarion
    In the future if you ask a person to be a reference and they accept, ask for their home phone number and address. It is really not a good idea to use work numbers for a place that you used to work at. It puts the people who support you in a very awkward position. Even if you left under good conditions, employers are often angry that you left and less than willing to do you any favors.
  3. by   AngelfireRN
    Quote from cxg174
    In the future if you ask a person to be a reference and they accept, ask for their home phone number and address. It is really not a good idea to use work numbers for a place that you used to work at. It puts the people who support you in a very awkward position. Even if you left under good conditions, employers are often angry that you left and less than willing to do you any favors.

    I DID give her home phone number, and that was it. I have no idea how PNB got the number to the clinic. I was as surprised as anyone to hear that NP was called at work. Her home number was the only one I gave.
  4. by   snootwiggie1
    Does your state have a Labor Board?? They are the ones that set the guidelines for what info can be given out. At-will employers are very limited in what info they can divulge. CA is an at-will employment state and I think they can only verify dates of employment and possibly rate of pay, otherwise, they can't say a flippin' thing. So, contact your local labor board. The tech was w-a-a-a-a-y out of line. The PNB was out of line too; she should only have spoken to the ref and requested the tech to leave a message for ref to contact him/her.
    My family was the way yours are. I didn't think I would ever measure up to my mother's expectations, no matter what I did, no matter what area of my life was up for scrutiny. We finally made peace a few years before she died--after I'd been her primary caregiver for 10 years, putting my life on hold to care for her. It's hard to hold on to your self-esteem when you're constantly being put down or compared to another, like Christine.
    Lots of love & HUGS to you.
  5. by   nursemarion
    Quote from AngelfireRN
    I DID give her home phone number, and that was it. I have no idea how PNB got the number to the clinic. I was as surprised as anyone to hear that NP was called at work. Her home number was the only one I gave.
    Then it is the fault of the person checking your references. Any HR person or manager who checks references should know better that to call someone at other than the contact number you provided. I am wondering if this job is another crazy place? I hope it works out.
  6. by   caliotter3
    Quote from AngelfireRN
    I DID give her home phone number, and that was it. I have no idea how PNB got the number to the clinic. I was as surprised as anyone to hear that NP was called at work. Her home number was the only one I gave.
    I think you've now got a pretty good picture of your new boss. Best to be very wary and if I were you I would keep the 'ol resume ready to roll.
  7. by   tobesmartt
    [font=book antiqua]this seems to be a problem , first of all the np could have taken the call in a more private setting or ask the health med aide to be excused. being very careful around cna , med aide, they can get the professional in big bind. yes she owes you an apology. good luck

    g
  8. by   kwkrnc
    Hi, I have read your post along with each of the answers you have received thus far. First, take some slow, deep breaths because you must be calm in order to perform with the highest degree of professionalism and for the sake of your health. You are correct, the tech had no business making the comments and it actually does constitue a slanderous action. Your response was appropriate in that you asked the employer to take a degree of responsibility regarding this behavior. They likely will consult with the individual, discipline her and add those actions to the employees file. Any additional course of action will depend on a multitude of factors, most importantly, the employee's performance history. If this was an isolated incident, for an otherwise excellent nursing assistant, then hopefully they will use it as a teaching moment and she will benefit from this error in judgement. If, it is her rule of behavior then they will likely terminate her and again hopefully she will learn from the experience. I would like to remind you that often nursing assistants have not been well educated and do not posess the professional demeanor one would like to see. For that matter, it has been my experience that one will have to deal with other nurses, docs, therapists, and other ancillary staff that will not behave professionally.

    But, what about you....the most important thing is not what she said but how you respond. Thus far it appears to me that you have handled things well. I would suggest that you spend at least a few minutes thinking about what she said and asking yourself what, if any, part you played in her speaking of you this way. As a general rule of thumb this kind of thing is the direct result of poor communication. I cringe when I see how often nurses speak to assistants as though they are servents. In the best circumstances, and I have been blessed to work in some of those, the nursing assistant is my right arm, as well as extra pair of senses. In the grand scheme of things this will be but one small obstacle you will ever face. I should warn you that excellent nurses often suffer the most criticism because they set high standards for themself and those around them. My favorite experience was when a staff member complained that "having her (me) here feels like having the JCAHO here and I responded that while I was sorry he felt that way that under no circumstances would I lower my standards. Interestingly enough, not long after his Father was a patient and he specifically requested that I care for his Father. An old saying is ringing in my ear: Remember, the cream always rises to the top. Nursing takes a lot but if you allow it nursing will return many times over what you have invested. I wish you many Blessings, kwkrnc Oh, I just saw what imkw_np wrote and she is a nurse with wisdom.
  9. by   KMULL002
    I would write her up, speak to your charge, director, and supervisor regarding this incident.
  10. by   AngelfireRN
    Thanks again, all. I have good news! I went on another interview today, and it went quite well. The doc is only now considering hiring an NP, and after our chat, he said he was 90% sure he wanted one now. I offered to work as an RN for him until I get certified, and also because I have one more semester to go for my FNP (have completed ACNP classes, sit exam next month), and also because I have lots to learn about his specialty. He seemed to like the fact that I offered that option, was willing to take call, see hospital pts, and do the H&Ps. I never minded doing nursey stuff at the old clinic, like shots, blood draws, vitals, etc. I even learned to run the lab equipment.

    That was part of the beef between me and Doc, she would alternately praise me for knowing how to do things, TELL me to do things :"Why don't you draw his blood?", or lambast me for doing it, "I need you doing NP stuff!"

    Oh, well, it's the past now. At least I know I CAN do it and that the nurses at my new place might appreciate the fact that I'm NOT all uppity and think it's beneath me. The doc I interviewed with said that, in his opinion, wherever I landed, be it there or elsewhere, he thought I would be a great asset, that he could tell by talking to me. I'll take that as a positive sign.

    Thanks again all, I think it'll be OK. I really appreciate all this, I want y'all to know.
  11. by   sunsetestates
    You had every right to get angry! You should get a written apology now. The other administration should fire this person. Apparently they are not professional.
  12. by   limestone
    I can't believe anyone could or would do that. You are NOT over-reacting. If you don't get that job, go for legal redress. And even if you do, a written apology is warranted.

    I also think the caller should not have divulged the matter to be discussed. They should have asked to speak to your referree and the conversation should have been conducted in private.
  13. by   Mookie427
    Eeven tho you did get the job you need to find a labor relations lawyer in your area and call them. In most instances, they will give you a consultation for free and determine if there is a case. Take the OFFENSE and begin action now. It is disgraceful what was done to you.

    Put your former employer and tech on notice that this behavior will not be tolerated.
    Last edit by Mookie427 on May 6, '09

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