ABSN Adequately prepared?

  1. Hi! I'm looking for some input. I was accepted to 2 great programs in the Northeast - Curry ABSN and UMass Boston traditional. Everything about the accelerated program seems better for my family. The program seems very organized and the schedule is all laid out in advance, even with clinical so I would be able to ensure I had adequate childcare. My husband says he would prefer 16 months of hell vs 2.5 years of "kind of hell". My one reservation is whether I will be adequately prepared to be a nurse after going through an accelerated program. Wondering if anyone has any input. Thanks so much!
  2. Visit jj16 profile page

    About jj16

    Joined: Sep '16; Posts: 26; Likes: 7

    33 Comments

  3. by   203bravo
    Not exactly the answer you want, but I have known good and not so good nurses that have been a product of ABSN programs.... but then again there are also good and not so good nurses from traditional programs as well....

    Your success will depend on that amount of effort that you put into learning and implementing the material and skills that you will learn. Plus there needs to be some level of aptitude to learning at such a quick pace... I had a prior BS degree yet I attended a traditional 4 semester program and given the amount of material and speed at which it was presented to us I couldn't imagine trying to do it in a 15 month time period, but that's just me.

    Best of luck.
  4. by   jj16
    Thank you!! I think that makes sense. I'm generally a good student, so I think I CAN agent through either program but I'm a little worried for sure about actually retaining the info at such a quick pace. Like I guess I'm worried that I'll pass the tests and then the info will be gone. I appreciate your thoughts! It's a tough decision for sure!
  5. by   Guy in Babyland
    I went through a 15 month ABSN program. I felt that I got a better education and was better prepared than if I had gone through a traditional program. Since each class builds on the previous class, we had less time between classes and less time to forget information from previous semester. ABSN programs require a previous BS degree, which means everyone has been through college before and is dedicated to the program. The class discussions were very interesting because you had a room full of adults that have experience in the subject being taught (psych, Athletic Training, Sports Fitness, Neurobiology). Instead of the typical traditional clinical group which attempts to hide during clinical, we were constantly trying to find skills to practice during clinical. My ABSN program had a 100% first attempt NCLEX pass rate with half of the class passing at 75 questions.

    Traditional vs ABSN education is the same. ABSN is just more compact. If the school is a quality school, they will do their part to prepare you, the rest is up to you. A school is not going to produce a quality graduate if the graduate was not a quality student.
    Last edit by Guy in Babyland on Jul 22
  6. by   jj16
    Wow!!! That's so encouraging!!! Thank you!!! Do you mind me asking where you went? Im in MA and was accepted to Curry's Accelerated program.
  7. by   Guy in Babyland
    Indiana State. We were provided experiences far beyond the typical nursing school experience. First and last semesters were summer semesters (only ABSN students during summer school). The first summer, we (both first and last semester ABSN students) participated in Mass casualty scenario with the National Guard Urban Search and Rescue. They brought a massive amount of equipment for building rescue and triage. First semester students were patients and last semester students were the first responders (triage) with the National Guard rescuing the victims. The last summer we were the first responders and the first semester ABSN students were the patients. It was a very enjoyable experience.

    During Community Nursing, we put on a Health Fair in the gymnasium of our local Maximum Security Federal Penitentiary (yes, health fair for federal inmates).
  8. by   applewhitern
    I went to nursing school for 21 months in an accelerated program and did fine.
  9. by   elkpark
    Quote from Guy in Babyland
    Instead of the typical traditional clinical group which attempts to hide during clinical, we were constantly trying to find skills to practice during clinical.
    Wow, that's quite a sweeping generalization about traditional nursing program students. What evidence do you have that it is "typical" for students in non-accelerated programs to "attempt(s) to hide during clinical"?
  10. by   elkpark
    Quote from jj16
    Hi! I'm looking for some input. I was accepted to 2 great programs in the Northeast - Curry ABSN and UMass Boston traditional. Everything about the accelerated program seems better for my family. The program seems very organized and the schedule is all laid out in advance, even with clinical so I would be able to ensure I had adequate childcare. My husband says he would prefer 16 months of hell vs 2.5 years of "kind of hell". My one reservation is whether I will be adequately prepared to be a nurse after going through an accelerated program. Wondering if anyone has any input. Thanks so much!
    My only caution would be to be aware that, even though the schools seem v. organized and "the schedule is all laid out in advance," changes sometimes have to be made in class or clinical schedules over the course of a nursing program (of any kind). Things happen. You will need to be prepared to be flexible about scheduling.

    Best wishes for your journey!
  11. by   AceOfHearts<3
    I completed an ABSN program that was even shorter. 3 years out and I've been an ICU nurse for 1.5 years and several of my coworkers completed the same program. I have classmates in grad school to become NPs and some are in CRNA programs. I'd say we were well prepared.
  12. by   jj16
    That's good advice!!! The cohort is small and I guess the placement sites are made by the school well in advance which I guess can be both good and bad because there is less flexibility. Since my husband is a fireman with a rotating schedule and we have 4 small kids I'm hoping it's as close to what they're saying it will be as possible. Fingers crossed.
  13. by   Guy in Babyland
    Quote from elkpark
    Wow, that's quite a sweeping generalization about traditional nursing program students. What evidence do you have that it is "typical" for students in non-accelerated programs to "attempt(s) to hide during clinical"?
    Many posts from traditional students, clinical instructors, and nurses that were assigned to students on this site. When you hear enough comments, the assumption that it has become "typical".

    Maybe I should clarify my statement. "From reading comments on this site, there are a certain number of students in traditional programs that choose to hide during clinicals. Those numbers may vary from clinical group to clinical group. It has been my experience from my clinical cohort and testimony from my Med/ Surg instructor that this has never been an issue with ABSN groups."
    Last edit by Guy in Babyland on Jul 22
  14. by   verene
    Quote from Guy in Babyland
    I went through a 15 month ABSN program. I felt that I got a better education and was better prepared than if I had gone through a traditional program. Since each class builds on the previous class, we had less time between classes and less time to forget information from previous semester. ABSN programs require a previous BS degree, which means everyone has been through college before and is dedicated to the program. The class discussions were very interesting because you had a room full of adults that have experience in the subject being taught (psych, Athletic Training, Sports Fitness, Neurobiology). Instead of the typical traditional clinical group which attempts to hide during clinical, we were constantly trying to find skills to practice during clinical. My ABSN program had a 100% first attempt NCLEX pass rate with half of the class passing at 75 questions.

    Traditional vs ABSN education is the same. ABSN is just more compact. If the school is a quality school, they will do their part to prepare you, the rest is up to you. A school is not going to produce a quality graduate if the graduate was not a quality student.
    This was more or less my experience in an ABSN program as well. I felt competent to practice as a new grad after graduating and my employer reviews have all been positive and stated that I have stronger assessment and clinical judgement skills than they would expect for my length of time being out of school. Not sure how much of that comes from my prior work in health care, passion for the population and thus my own outside learning, and how much is from the program, but I do feel generally quite happy with the education I received.

    Though I will echo that school is what you make of it. My program had a lot of highly motivated students who really tried to make the most of the program and what it offered.

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