About the Nature of Nursing - page 2

A unitary view of the human as a unique, valued, and precious person in and of himself-or herself to be cared for, respected, nurtured, understood and assisted; in general, a philosophical view of a... Read More

  1. by   brownbook
    I have read the post three times......well.....actually I read the first two sentences three times and couldn't go any farther.
  2. by   Pixie.RN
    I am not only back in school, but also reading this week about grand theories and unitary beings and energy. I have to read each line about four times to comprehend what I am reading. I had no idea how to compare and contrast the Totality Paradigm vs. the Spontaneity Paradigm, but oh boy, now I do! Sigh.
  3. by   Jedrnurse
    Quote from Pixie.RN
    I am not only back in school, but also reading this week about grand theories and unitary beings and energy. I have to read each line about four times to comprehend what I am reading. I had no idea how to compare and contrast the Totality Paradigm vs. the Spontaneity Paradigm, but oh boy, now I do! Sigh.
    I imagine it's similar to comparing and contrasting leprechauns and sprites...
  4. by   OldDude
    Quote from Pixie.RN
    I am not only back in school, but also reading this week about grand theories and unitary beings and energy. I have to read each line about four times to comprehend what I am reading. I had no idea how to compare and contrast the Totality Paradigm vs. the Spontaneity Paradigm, but oh boy, now I do! Sigh.
    That is easily explained. When I want to order a beer for me AND my Sweet Petunia I use the Totality and when I order two beers for myself I use the Spontaneity...in either case I ask the wait-person to bring me a paradigm beers. They won't serve you more than a paradigm at a time.
  5. by   Pixie.RN
    Quote from OldDude
    That is easily explained. When I want to order a beer for me AND my Sweet Petunia I use the Totality and when I order two beers for myself I use the Spontaneity...in either case I ask the wait-person to bring me a paradigm beers. They won't serve you more than a paradigm at a time.
    I can't stop laughing!!! Beer probably would have been extremely helpful.
  6. by   nursel56
    As a nurse who came of age in the 70s, I can say that Ms. Watson drew heavily from many popular culture psychology movements of the day. I'm having a flashback of Gestalt principles, Esalen, I'm OK, You're OK, Jonathan Livingston Seagull (a book) and "spikes and waveforms". Oh wait, that last one is a Watson-esque concept that crept it's way into Nursing Diagnoses, (and has finally quietly been retired after being ridiculed for decades). Phew! So cringeworthy!
  7. by   Pixie.RN
    Quote from nursel56
    As a nurse who came of age in the 70s, I can say that Ms. Watson drew heavily from many popular culture psychology movements of the day. I'm having a flashback of Gestalt principles, Esalen, I'm OK, You're OK, Jonathan Livingston Seagull (a book) and "spikes and waveforms". Oh wait, that last one is a Watson-esque concept that crept it's way into Nursing Diagnoses, (and has finally quietly been retired after being ridiculed for decades). Phew! So cringeworthy!
    Yet "energy field, disturbed" lives on as a diagnosis in nursing diagnosis books. No joke!
  8. by   BostonFNP
    She's a loon.
  9. by   Pixie.RN
    Quote from BostonFNP
    She's a loon.
    Who, me? The OP? Jean Watson? Hahaha!

    All I know is that we got a "caritas room" grant out of our embrace of the Caring model about 10 years ago. That grant bought our ER staff a massage chair and a little Zen fountain in a small quiet room.
  10. by   TriciaJ
    Quote from Pixie.RN
    Who, me? The OP? Jean Watson? Hahaha!

    All I know is that we got a "caritas room" grant out of our embrace of the Caring model about 10 years ago. That grant bought our ER staff a massage chair and a little Zen fountain in a small quiet room.
    How wonderful! Now if they only got breaks to enjoy them...
  11. by   TriciaJ
    By the way, what did we embrace before the "Caring Model"? We cared, but just didn't have a model for it? We didn't care, so we didn't need a model? And what was it called when Florence did it?
  12. by   BostonFNP
    Quote from Pixie.RN
    Who, me? The OP? Jean Watson? Hahaha!

    All I know is that we got a "caritas room" grant out of our embrace of the Caring model about 10 years ago. That grant bought our ER staff a massage chair and a little Zen fountain in a small quiet room.
    It's my Cinderella test...if the shoe fits...

    I intended my comment towards Jean, but if she is dishing out massage chairs I could be persuaded...
  13. by   amzyRN
    I don't have a problem with it as a philosophical opinion. It's not based in fact, but her view of humanity and nursing. At least that's my take on it. It's like the belief or disbelief in "God" or something greater than the flesh. Who knows what came before the big bang. It's philosophy. I like to think about these things sometimes. I think caring is part of human nature, not exclusive to nursing or the desire to nurse someone. Nursing for me is primarily a job that I get paid to do and at times I'm intellectually stimulated by some of what I see. Sometimes I feel good about the work, that I have helped another human being and I think to myself that my time was well spent. I remember when during a code the doctor held the patients hand a few minutes before he called time of death. I have seen other doctors express caring towards patients so I don't believe it's limited to the nursing profession.

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