(IN)Appropriate Dress

  1. Nurse Practitioners are at the forefront of healthcare reform. Many patients only contact with a healthcare professional will be with a Nurse Practitioner.
    My question is this: Do you cringe when you see a nurse practitioner dressed inappropriately for the professional setting?
    Tell us about a personal experience that you have had with a nurse-practitioner who did not dress appropriately for their setting.
    Examples would be a male nurse practitioner who wore skinny jeans and a muscle shirt, or perhaps a female that wore yoga pants and high-heel boots.
    Last edit by trinitymaster on Feb 19, '15 : Reason: Brain Cells received CPR
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  2. Poll: Should Nurse Practioners adhere to a formal dress code?

    • Yes

      80.77% 42
    • No

      19.23% 10
    52 Votes / Multiple Choice
  3. Visit trinitymaster profile page

    About trinitymaster, BSN, RN

    Joined: Jan '12; Posts: 369; Likes: 951
    Specialty: 16 year(s) of experience in Long Term Acute Care, TCU

    87 Comments

  4. by   JWG223
    I don't cringe, but I personally would dress appropriately.
  5. by   ktwlpn
    I cringe when I see any professional dressed inappropriately.The NP's at my family practice office and those where my husband is a patient seem to dress appropriately,ditto for the NP's at the LTC where I work and the ones at our local Minute Clinic.They are in dress shirts,slacks and lab coats.On the other hand,the nursing admin in the LTC where I work can be wildly inappropriate,skin tight,low cut,sparkly glittery,halter tops,tops with large cut outs,mini skirts,wild hair hanging down all over the place ...One of them is a little short chubby thing into skintight clothing,leopard prints and silk flowers on the side of her head,she looks ridiculous and family members have remarked upon it.It seems to me in this area NP's are striving to be taken seriously.I don't think they need to be treated like children and given a dress code...It is common sense.In the LTC where I work we now have a female admin and she has stated dress is not important to her....
    Last edit by ktwlpn on Feb 20, '15
  6. by   trinitymaster
    Quote from ktwlpn
    I cringe when I see any professional dressed inappropriately.The NP's at my family practice office and those where my husband is a patient seem to dress appropriately,ditto for the NP's at the LTC where I work and the ones at our local Minute Clinic.They are in dress shirts,slacks and lab coats.On the other hand,the nursing admin in the LTC where I work can be wildly inappropriate,skin tight,low cut,sparkly glittery,halter tops,tops with large cut outs,mini skirts,wild hair hanging down all over the place ...One of them is a little short chubby thing into skintight clothing,leopard prints and silk flowers on the side of her head,she looks ridiculous and family members have remarked upon it.It seems to me in this area NP's are striving to be taken seriously.I don't think they need to be treated like children and given a dress code...It is common sense.In the LTC where I work we now have a female admin and she has stated dress is not important to her....
    Dress is not important so long as it is done appropriately. We are all professionals and must act as such. The Nurse Practitioners that you describe apparently understand this concept and are not falling into the trap that your administrative personnel have succumbed to.

    Uniforms are for children. Dress codes are for professionals and other responsible people.
  7. by   pinkiepieRN
    Most employers have a dress code in place. Whether or not it is actively enforced is a different story. Whom do you suggest create, implement and enforce this universal dress code for NPs? I would also think that the dress code might be dependent on the environment, such as scrubs in an ER versus business casual or professional in an office setting.
  8. by   trinitymaster
    Quote from pinkiepieRN
    Most employers have a dress code in place. Whether or not it is actively enforced is a different story. Whom do you suggest create, implement and enforce this universal dress code for NPs? I would also think that the dress code might be dependent on the environment, such as scrubs in an ER versus business casual or professional in an office setting.
    Nurse Practitioners are perfectly capable of policing themselves. It is my belief that those who dress like they are going to a bar after work are the ones who did not have a proper role model.
    Those of us seeking higher degrees should remember to be the change that we want to see.
  9. by   MunoRN
    I think what's proper is whatever their patient's see as appropriate and worthy of their respect and trust which isn't just one type of attire. In my area, "professional" attire doesn't meet these goals and is far more likely to cause suspicion and a sense that the physician / NP isn't a "good fit" for them.
  10. by   abbnurse
    Quote from ktwlpn
    .On the other hand,the nursing admin in the LTC where I work can be wildly inappropriate,skin tight,low cut,sparkly glittery,halter tops,tops with large cut outs,mini skirts,wild hair hanging down all over the place ...One of them is a little short chubby thing into skintight clothing,leopard prints and silk flowers on the side of her head,she looks ridiculous and family members have remarked upon it.....
    You paint quite a picture! For some reason, this just cracked me up, especially the "silk flowers on the side of her head". I can picture it perfectly .
  11. by   Farawyn
    Quote from trinitymaster
    Dress is not important so long as it is done appropriately. We are all professionals and must act as such. The Nurse Practitioners that you describe apparently understand this concept and are not falling into the trap that your administrative personnel have succumbed to.

    Uniforms are for children. Dress codes are for professionals and other responsible people.
    Maybe some of those "professionals" have not gotten the memo, because some NP, PAs and Docs, ugh, really? I cringe at what they wear.
    I'm a nurse, not a child, and I wear a uniform= scrubs.
  12. by   Farawyn
    Quote from trinitymaster
    Nurse Practitioners are perfectly capable of policing themselves. It is my belief that those who dress like they are going to a bar after work are the ones who did not have a proper role model.
    Those of us seeking higher degrees should remember to be the change that we want to see.
    ...or maybe they are going to a bar after work?
    Yes, I agree with your last statement.
  13. by   trinitymaster
    Quote from Farawyn
    I'm a nurse, not a child, and I wear a uniform= scrubs.
    No, you wear appropriate professional attire.
    I wear scrubs as well since I work the floor.
    My facility is going to department-approved colors. I do not particularly care for being told what to wear, but such is life.
  14. by   PacoUSA
    One nurse practitioner at my hospital wears a college sweatshirt, black jeans, and Dansko clogs. Sloppy. With an attitude to match no less.

    She's also about 50 years old.


    Sent from my iPad using allnurses
  15. by   anh06005
    I do think some of it depends on the clinic (though no excuses for what some of you have been describing).

    Professional attire with a lab coat is always ideal but in smaller clinics I have seen some NP's wear nice jeans, tennis shoes, and a t shirt with the clinic logo on it. It's more casual but the rural clinics I've been in are a more laid back environment.

    Knowing I was going to be a NP eventually I always got my tattoos places where I could hide them rather easily. I have one on my upper chest/shoulder so I make sure to buy high necked under shirts to cover it. Occasionally I wear some trousers that only go to my ankles so one of ankle tattoos peaks out sometimes but if that's the worst I do my patients can get over it.

    My town has only in the last few years started hiring PA's and NP's for primary care clinics and for the hospitalist group. Before that you only found them in the urgent cares so our patients are still warming up to the idea of someone without MD behind their name caring for them.

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