$1x40x4x12=$1,920 - page 2

I would get $1 per hour more for a BSN. If I were to work 40 hours a week, I would make $1920 more per year. I'm 51 years old. How much does it cost to obtain a BSN? Would it be worth it, in pure... Read More

  1. by   GOMER42
    I keep seeing everyone state that the BSN will give her more options.
    Really, I've not seen my BSN provide me with many more options than an ASN would have.
    Now an MSN is what would provide the options, but a BSN... not so much.
  2. by   FireStarterRN
    BTW, I'm 1 1/2 years post menopause, never had a hot flash, fit as a fiddle. Resting pulse is 60, walk, run or other exercise daily, above average dietary habits...
  3. by   regularRN
    [FONT="Comic Sans MS"]Firestarter, I totally get your point... I'm 45 and am wondering if I'll be able to run around eight hours a day when I'm in my fifties... All the nurse managers and nurse educators have a BSN or MSN, if that's where you want to go. What about becoming a Nurse Practitioner? As an NP you will undoubtedly earn a higher salary... I'm considering public health.
  4. by   FireStarterRN
    Quote from GOMER42
    I keep seeing everyone state that the BSN will give her more options.
    Really, I've not seen my BSN provide me with many more options than an ASN would have.
    Now an MSN is what would provide the options, but a BSN... not so much.
    Well, one advantage is $1 per hour more in my current job.

    I don't want to go into management, btw. I don't like managing other people and I loathe paperwork. I prefer bedside nursing for an hourly wage.
  5. by   Jules A
    Quote from llg
    Another factor to consider:

    You are 51 years old. That's about the age when my body started to deteriorate. It's amazing how your body changes with menopause. Are you 100% sure that you will be able to (or want to) stay in your current job until retirement? Is there a chance that you might be interested in another type of job in a couple of years?

    A BSN will give you many more job choices than you currently have. Those jobs might not pay more ... but they might be a better fit for your post-menopausal body and lifestyle. As you approach retirement, you might want those options.

    It's not just about the money.
    Sadly this is exactly why I'm going forward with my education. I'd be perfectly happy to remain a floor nurse for the next 20 years but I'm pretty confident that my body won't hold out that long. So as I see it either teaching or working as a NP doing counseling and prescribing are my best options.
  6. by   FireStarterRN
    Quote from Lotte
    [FONT="Comic Sans MS"]Firestarter, I totally get your point... I'm 45 and am wondering if I'll be able to run around eight hours a day when I'm in my fifties... All the nurse managers and nurse educators have a BSN or MSN, if that's where you want to go. What about becoming a Nurse Practitioner? As an NP you will undoubtedly earn a higher salary... I'm considering public health.
    Don't feel ambitious enough to become a NP.

    One consideration for me is the time investment. I have 2 teenage daughters whom I'm totally enjoying. I am financially secure. Do I really want to invest a lot of time for a year or two to get this extra degree? I wouldn't hesitate if it weren't for them.
  7. by   Jules A
    Quote from FireStarterRN
    Well, one advantage is $1 per hour more in my current job.

    I don't want to go into management, btw. I don't like managing other people and I loathe paperwork. I prefer bedside nursing for an hourly wage.
    All well and good if your body holds out. It sure sounds like you are in great shape but please don't discount the fact that age spares no one.
  8. by   gary62_1
    If I was going to stop at a BSN I wouldn't do it, but I plan on becoming a FNP which gives a significant salary increase (as you know). So I'm going to jump through the collegiate hoops eventually.
  9. by   KeyMaster
    "One consideration for me is the time investment. I have 2 teenage daughters whom I'm totally enjoying. I am financially secure. Do I really want to invest a lot of time for a year or two to get this extra degree? I wouldn't hesitate if it weren't for them."

    When do you plan to retire? How long before your daughters move out of the house? How much will college cost you? (think books, tuition, lost OT at work because of class, etc.) Just some things to think about.

    If it costs you $10,000 bucks you would need to work 5 years to pay yourself back - and that extra dollar won't be there until you graduate with that BSN.
    I am currently enrolled in an RN to BSN and I am taking 1 class at a time, because I think anything more would kill me. I had hugely underestimated the time commitment of class time, outside reading and researching and writing paper after paper. It has a definite impact on the time I get to spend with my daughters. I am doing online classes, so vacations are out unless I buy a laptop and can access the internet, because I have to "attend" class 5 days out of 7. But I do think it will be worth it all in the long run, because I don't want to stay in my current job forever.

    If you have a specific job in mind that requires a BSN then absolutely go for it. There are many more options available with a degree - at least in my neck of the woods.
    If it's just for the joy of learning and improving your nursing knowledge you may want to think about time away from your family - maybe wait until your kids are away at school themselves.
    Either way you chose - best of luck!!
  10. by   llg
    It's not just management jobs. There are lots of other jobs that usually require a BSN (but may not require an MSN). For example:

    1. Staff education
    2. Discharge planner
    3. Some public health/home health jobs
    4. Some hospice jobs
    5. Patient education
    6. Program coordinators (e.g. trach care coordinator, diabetes care coordinator, etc.)
    7. Some nursing informatics jobs
    8. Infection control
    9. Performance improvement / quality assurance
    10. Research project coordinators (recruit subjects, gather data, etc.)
    11. Teach CNA's
    12. Teach LPN's

    That's 12 possibilities off the top of my head. I'm sure we could add others to the list if we tried. In some hospitals, it may also be true that roles such as "preceptor" and "charge nurse" that pay differentials may soon be limited to BSN's. And as more nurses get their BSN's, those who don't have it may find some of their old options a little less available. Hospitals with clinical ladders may include the BSN as part of the requirement for the higher levels of staff nurse positions, etc.
  11. by   llg
    Quote from IlovenursingRN
    Oh please! There are 50 year olds who can run circles around 20-30 years old. It's how you take care of yourself.
    There are not more job choices with a BSN unless you plan on moving into management.
    I see you are in your early 30's. As you and your friends get older, you may learn that even those who take care of themselves get cancer ... and sometimes have children or parents or spouses that require something from you for which flexible work hours would be a help. No amount of "healthy lifestyle" can guarantee that you will not be hit by a drunk driver and hurt your back and need to avoid being on your feet and/or lifiting patients.

    "Blaming the victim" for health problems is not always justfied. Not everything can be prevented through diet, exercise, rest, etc.

    As for the "BSN's are only for managers" mentality, see my other post.
  12. by   changeofpaceRN
    Another thing to consider is TAXES.. I know we all love that word. How much extra would be taken out because of that? Would it push you into another tax bracket?
    I always think continuing your education is worth it because you are investing in yourself. the programs I checked out seem to be running anywhere from 5-15K.
  13. by   showbizrn
    Quote from firestarterrn
    i would get $1 per hour more for a bsn. if i were to work 40 hours a week, i would make $1920 more per year. i'm 51 years old. how much does it cost to obtain a bsn? would it be worth it, in pure monetary terms, let alone the aggravation of going through the academic hoops?
    :typing


    how badly do you want this bsn?
    if it's just about dollars and cents,
    take a closer look at what
    a bsn offers.

    check out lig's post
    that contains the list of jobs
    (non-management)
    that require a bsn.

    i hear you about the aggravation because what's stopping me from taking any college course is
    i don't feel like writing
    not one paper.
    and i'm good at wrirting
    (so i've been told:d)
    but i want to enjoy myself
    in my last years past 50
    and don't want to invest my precious hours
    developing, researching and organizing papers.
    enough said,
    much success to you!!!

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