I hate nursing.. - page 7

I graduated in December, and have been working on an inpatient oncology unit since. I DREAD going to work each week. The days I do have off, I'm too tired to enjoy. I'm not overwhelmed or any of the... Read More

  1. by   bluemartian
    I did notice the NP and CRNA agenda was pushed hard at my school while I was in nursing school, but I felt it was more of an academic ego trip as many of my class mates already had their minds made up that they did not want to stay at the bedside. At the end of our last semester there were several information sessions for graduate school which would try to convince you to go to grad school after 1 yr, if you chose to stay at the BSN level then you must not be ambitious enough.

    The other issue I had with nursing school was that the clinical rotations were a joke, each semester we would meet for clinicals with our respected clinical instructors, then would be assigned to nurse and you would just watch what the nurse did. Then we would go to lunch with the instructor ala mother goose style, debrief in a room and be home by 2pm. What the hell is that! For 4 semesters! No wonder when I went to do my clinical practicum I was drowning from day one. Oh but I would be sent home by 2pm, I always asked if I can stay later to observe and learn more, I would be told no that the instructor must be present for liability purposes.

    Some of our clincal instructors were in graduate school and part of their deal would be to precept us students as this would enable the instructors to attend grad school at a reduced cost or even free. The rule that was always brought up was **** rolls down hill, if you make my life hard I can make your life worse!! This is a tier 1 school.
  2. by   jjjoy
    Quote from Ruby Vee
    most of the new graduates I've met have no idea what they're going to have to do to get that year of experience.... I'm not sure why it is, but this seems to be a relatively recent turn of events; perhaps in the last 10 to 15 years.
    While there are those students who want quick and easy gratification (good money and flexible hours) and won't listen to any evidence otherwise, some schools of nursing actively recruit and encourage these students who have *no* interest in bedside nursing and/or expect really flexible hours. At informational meetings, a prospective student can flat out say "I'm not sure if nursing is for me. I do NOT want to work in bedside nursing" and the school representatives will say "Oh, no problem! There are MANY opportunities for nurses besides staff nurse positions!" Some recruiters might slip in as a dismissive afterthought "You can pick up work as an RN while continuing on with your advanced studies"... as if it wasn't any big deal to make the transition from student to practicing RN. A prospective student might worry "I don't want to work nights and holidays" and the recruiter will respond "Most places do self-scheduling! You can work PRN!" and downplay the qualifying aside "You may need to accept some undesirable shifts when you first start"... which can come across sounding like maybe a few bad shifts here and there, not day in and day out for months and years.
  3. by   pedicurn
    Quote from janfrn
    Here it's all about seniority - and I can't have vacation during the summer after 16 years on the job so why should they just walk onto the unit and make that kind of demand?
    .
    Now where I work in Australia ....new employees will not have much say in their first year on the unit, re vacation.
    However, into the second year.... full-time nurses have equal opportunity regarding vacation allocation.
    I do think this is fair ....all nurses make a valued contribution to their unit and all nurses are adults with lives outside of nursing.
    This way, we all have a shot at having at least one holiday off.... must work either Xmas or New Year.
    Over the summer, I would expect to have two weeks vacation every second year.
    Every other year my manager will try hard to give me a couple of days so I can stretch my grouped days off into two weeks off.
    It works as long as people are flexible and understanding.
    I honestly would not work in a job where I couldn't have a vacation in the summer after 16 yrs ...it doesn't need to be like this
  4. by   NotReady4PrimeTime
    When first choice of vacation time is the ONLY benefit from staying on the job for many years, it's really hard to successfully argue against it. No, it isn't completely fair, but neither is it fair that someone with half as many years of experience makes exactly the same hourly wage and shift differentials, has exactly the same number of special leave days and vacation days, exactly the same number of statutory holidays, exactly the same number of professional development days, exactly the same pension benefits and so on.
  5. by   pedicurn
    Quote from janfrn
    When first choice of vacation time is the ONLY benefit from staying on the job for many years, it's really hard to successfully argue against it. No, it isn't completely fair, but neither is it fair that someone with half as many years of experience makes exactly the same hourly wage and shift differentials, has exactly the same number of special leave days and vacation days, exactly the same number of statutory holidays, exactly the same number of professional development days, exactly the same pension benefits and so on.
    Well... in Australia we reach a point; after several years, where all experienced staff nurses are earning about the same.
    I'm not going to complain .... who's to say a younger RN with eight years top-notch experience in the specialty contributes less than an older RN with twenty-eight years of so-so experience in the same specialty?
    There comes a point where extra years of experience may not contribute that much more.
    We all earn the same annual leave/sick days/stat days/study leave (no pension here) and that's OK.
    The 28 yr old RN is working hard in the trenches, doing rotating days and nights .....just like me.
    IMHO I don't have an issue with it.
    But I do wish we kept getting a pay rise every year like US nurses....that would be wonderful
  6. by   NotReady4PrimeTime
    I'm not saying that there's a huge difference in the contributions of younger nurses with lots of valuable experience and the much older nurse with twice as many years on the job. What I'm saying is that there has to be some sort of incentive for those who have stuck it out through thick and thin with one employer. Otherwise, why stick around?

    PS... could we please send Dr Duckett back down under?? Please?
  7. by   pedicurn
    Quote from janfrn
    I'm not saying that there's a huge difference in the contributions of younger nurses with lots of valuable experience and the much older nurse with twice as many years on the job. What I'm saying is that there has to be some sort of incentive for those who have stuck it out through thick and thin with one employer. Otherwise, why stick around?

    PS... could we please send Dr Duckett back down under?? Please?
    The incentive might just be job security set in concrete (unless one does something really heinous)
    The 28 yr veteran costs the organisation the same as the RN with 8 yrs experience...this means the older nurse is extremely unlikely to be laid off.
    The employer is getting 28 yrs for the price of 8.

    I don't know what it's like in Canada ...but down-under we older nurses seem to have no other real value for the organisation.
    Put in 40 yrs service for one organisation and you will get nothing when you retire. Your coworkers will bring cake and cookies and you will have your own little party in the break room during routine coffee time.
    I think we might be kidding ourselves if we think nurses are going to get more than that
  8. by   Sad RN
    I think this is a great idea. Thanks for recommending. I have been Nursing for awhile and am in a bit of a rutt. This could help get the juices flowing again A book that reflects on planning and navigating a career is something I need to consider more these days. I like nursing but I think I might not be happy with the changes in my area/politics.
  9. by   melmonlove
    Quote from ruby vee
    despite what seems to be the popular opinion of new nurses, nursing students and about-to-be nursing students on threads such as these, i am also one of the senior nurses that the students and new grads seek out to answer questions for them. as far as i know, no one that i know personally has ever believed that i'm a "young eater." if there were such a thing.

    i frequently see new grads make statements like the above -- prefaced by saying "i'm only working hear while i go to school for my np" or "i'm just doing the least icu i can do before i go to anesthesia school." despite our manager's clearly stated policy that she will not be giving recommendations to anyone who doesn't work in our icu a minimum of two years after getting off orientation, there are still those new grads who apply to crna programs a mere year after they've started working here, even though that's often not even six months off orientation. i wish i had a dollar for every new grad that's come to me or some of my peers asking for a letter of recommendation because they're so shocked that no one on the management team will give them one. they'll insist that our manager is a nasty old (bad word meaning female dog) and that this is a prime example of "nurses eating their young" because they "don't want anyone to get ahead." if they can find someone else to write a letter for them, they'll do it. and at least one girl that i knew of got into graduate school without any letters of recommendation from the workplace by virtue of asking her grandparents to endow a chair . . . .

    because i work in a well-known hospital, we often get new graduates fresh from prestigious nursing schools or whose parents and grand-parents have contributed large amounts of money either to our hospital or the nursing school. there are exceptions, of course, but many of them feel that they shouldn't have to work nights, weekends, holidays or do anything difficult before they inevitably move on. starting in july, before they're even a month into orientation, some of these new employees are making statements such as "i'm not working new year's eve -- i have a social life." and "i can't work christmas -- i have a family." they also don't want to clean up poop, deal with difficult families or miss a weekend at the beach. it seems to be the rare new grad who comes to the icu because they really want to take care of icu patients. we hire between 16 and 52 new grads a year, and usually only a few stay. it isn't because this is such a horrible place to work -- most of them start with the intention of just marking time until they get their advanced degrees.



    but it seems that very few new nursing graduates enter the profession prepared for working nights, weekends, holidays and doing the dirty work and back breaking labor associated with the job. perhaps my view is skewed because my unit is "a feeder unit" for anesthesia school, but most of the new graduates i've met have no idea what they're going to have to do to get that year of experience. it starts while they're still in hospital orientation, before they set foot on the unit in scrubs. "i'm getting married and i need three weeks off in july for the wedding and honeymoon, and i need every weekend in june off for the parties and i can't work christmas because my whole family is getting together." they're often the same new grads who claim that "the bitter old hags" are eating them because they're so much younger and more beautiful. and the ones who spend most of their shift flirting with the residents who, since the influx of mid-level providers into the icu, have nothing much to do.

    i'm not sure why it is, but this seems to be a relatively recent turn of events; perhaps in the last 10 to 15 years. in fact, all of the nurses i know who work in the icu because they want to work in the icu and do the actual work of the icu started more than ten years ago. that's frightening. and sad.
    i have to say i love what you just said. i will also be a new graduate this december and my dream is to eventually be in icu! i want to work nights, weekends, holidays...i honestly don't care as long as i can get the opportunity to do what i have a passion for! i will start applying next month and while my chances may be slim, i refuse to give up and know that i will end up there someday. i have experienced nurses in med surg clinicals who haven't been the nicest or willing to help but i never took it to heart. i'm sure that they have a lot of work and a student right next to them only makes their situation worse. however, i also had some great preceptors..and one of them being in my icu rotation. i will go into my future employer with an open mind and although i may encounter individuals that are not fond of me...i will choose not to let it get to me and affect my work.
  10. by   NotReady4PrimeTime
    melmonlove, for every one like you there are probably five of the other. Out of the dozen most recent newcomers to my unit, I can honestly only think of two that really are there because they want to do the job. The others are there because they've heard the workload is lighter - yeah, we're usually staffed 1:1, but that means nothing! - or they want to do transport nursing someday, or they think there's some sort of prestige in saying "I work in ICU at the blahblahblah, aren't I special?", or they're working on their Masters so they can be NPs and they need a place to work where they can do their research or type out their papers on the job.
  11. by   melmonlove
    Quote from janfrn
    melmonlove, for every one like you there are probably five of the other. Out of the dozen most recent newcomers to my unit, I can honestly only think of two that really are there because they want to do the job. The others are there because they've heard the workload is lighter - yeah, we're usually staffed 1:1, but that means nothing! - or they want to do transport nursing someday, or they think there's some sort of prestige in saying "I work in ICU at the blahblahblah, aren't I special?", or they're working on their Masters so they can be NPs and they need a place to work where they can do their research or type out their papers on the job.
    I understand what you're saying but hopefully i get the opportunity somewhere down the road. Plus you have to think that having days, not working nights or holidays comes with time and seniority. I wouldn't like it either if I have been at an employer for many years and a new graduate comes in "demanding" benefits. This of course not only implies with nursing but any profession.
  12. by   NotReady4PrimeTime
    If it were up to me, the screening process for applicants to our unit would weed out those people I just described and only select people such as yourself who have a passion for the work, a drive to learn and grow and the work ethic to get it all done. And if the screening process didn't catch tme then hopefully the orientation process would. But in my real world that's not going to happen. I expect that someone like you will make it work because you really have what it takes to be a team player. I wish you well.
  13. by   what was I thinking
    Yo need to leave ASAP. I'm in the same boat: nursing was OK for the 1st year, then I signed a contract and had to stay there for 3 more years. By the way I hate EVERYTHING about nursing. Now, it's affecting everything else in my life and it's like quicksand: the longer you wait to leave, the harder it is to leave. You get comfortable and stay a little longer... Now, I work in a "good" hospital with only 3-4 patients a nurse and with young, nice nurses. But it's nursing I don't like. CHanging beds, smelling people's breath, feeding people, constantly getting stuff for people... WHat was I thinking. I wasn't.

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