I hate nursing.. - page 6

I graduated in December, and have been working on an inpatient oncology unit since. I DREAD going to work each week. The days I do have off, I'm too tired to enjoy. I'm not overwhelmed or any of the... Read More

  1. by   Ruby Vee
    Quote from anadam
    i think the nursing school would never tell the truth to the students because they themselves are profit driven. probably half of the students would sign out if they understood the abuse they are in for. some suggestions to fix the system. make bsn entrance degree. have a clear career ladder and incentives for nurses to further their education. nursing as it is now could probably stand to be split in two different professions in the hospital. i have msn nurses with wealth of knowledge working side by side with nurses who have their diploma and they both make the same wage and are treated the same by the hospital. i know i might get backlash for this, but this shows that we as nurses do not value education. if we do not treat our profession with respect and do not take pride in our education, how are other profession to respect us.
    example speech pathologist - entrance-masters
    physical therapy-entrance doctoral degree etc.
    there are two ways to get nursing knowledge -- education and experience. don't discount the value of experience.

    (and i have an mba)
  2. by   Nursemom64
    Quote from Preeps
    I will admit it here; I hate nursing too. And it takes a lot to admit it. I had such high expectations in nursing school. I was so inspired and excited. I worked really hard and graduated at the top of my class. Now, here I am almost 3 years later and I am demoralized and question my decision often.
    I have only worked on one floor and I can honestly say I had never run into such mean-spirited people in my life. No, not all. There are some nice people I work with but enough to make life miserable. Nursing is a second career for me and in my first one I never had interpersonal problems with co-workers but here. . . so it makes me think it is not me, but them. I hate giving report to mean people. For example, I worked yesterday, had 5 patients and discharged 3 of them! One of them the order was written at 5;00 and I got them out by 6pm. So I had a full admission at 6;30pm and another one coming. Had 3 diabetics to give insulin and six oclock meds and finishing up. But the nurse I gave report to was mean and ugly because I didn't get enough done to satisfy her on the admission. The money is OK and I should appreciate I am employed but I can't believe this is what I was so excited about initially.
    I worked at a place like that too. I have always worked in customer service (nursing is a 2nd career for me too) and was never treated badly by coworkers. I still like being a nurse but feel a little jaded now. I'm looking for a new "niche"
  3. by   Zaphod
    I agree. experience is important, but it is a part of every profession as well as education. MBA is great as well as the many nurses who obtain their JD's. It might be just my opinion but I think if nursing required higher education we would command more respect and probably have better working conditions. Who knows..
  4. by   bluemartian
    As a 2nd career nurse 40 years old worked in several business/corporate environments, I have encountered resentment from peers because my nsg school only produces book nurses, so theres strike 1, oops you cant start an IV You'll learn it on the job, lets turn on you and kick your teeth in while you are on the floor, preceptor sends you on your break, oops NP notices that one of my patients has abd pain, get back from my break, I get chewed out by the preceptor for not treating the pt as a heart attack, (grant it vitals were in range) most of the nurses now will not even acknowledge me, at the end of the shift, the clinical instructor debriefs the class, then grills me in front of the class, as the semester progresses its not getting any better, confidence is down, I am asking techs for assistance, techs gang up and tell me "They dont pay us to precept nursing students" big joke. At the end of my practicum the best advice I received was it doesnt matter what you know, all you need to know id to survive in this jungle. Needless to say I really wanted to work within that unit, but after all of that it burst my bubble. So I have my license, I remain inactive, work for medical device companies, do inservices bring pizza, give out ceus, and get treated well 95% of the time. I meet several nurses on the business end who had enough of the abuse and chose to take their career to another level. I do get the irrational urge to pursue the bedside a few times a year but when I read threads like this it reminds me of the bad taste the experience left in my mouth. Now pushing 44, have hbp/ metabolic syndrome and my body does not respond to running with my hair on fire as I was able to do only 3 years ago.
  5. by   hunnybaby24
    Quote from Thank_You_RNs
    Me too. Now, that ive been through the end of the tunnel, the light is not even that better. I've spoken with some of my friends who are teachers, accountants, mechanics, etc.. they all seems to like their jobs and happy. Not frustrated and bitter like some of the RNs i've work in the past. What happened to being a Florence N? Is this behavior change normal? I think someone should do a CASE STUDY on this and find out!!!!! I think nursing schools should be upfront with their students about the working conditions of being a nurse and not just profit driven. I dont think our working conditions is not going to get better anytime soon. Sorry...Especially with the current recession, its just going to get worse ($$$$ talks).
    My solution, transfer to a unit that you like best with less backstabbing nurses who eats their young (goodluck on that!). Or go back to school, get your Masters degree (NP, CNS, etc.) equals less dirty work, less patient contact, work regular 8 hour job, lots of RESPECT, have your own office, happy stomach and smiley bladder, and less B*****.
    Sorry for being too honest.

    I think comparing the nurses of today to Florence Nightingale is unrealistic. She did not have all the demands that we have today in modern nursing. We wear a lot of hats, the stress gets to much sometimes, we need to vent. That is why we are bitter and frustrated.
  6. by   Ruby Vee
    Quote from thank_you_rns
    me too. now, that ive been through the end of the tunnel, the light is not even that better. i've spoken with some of my friends who are teachers, accountants, mechanics, etc.. they all seems to like their jobs and happy. not frustrated and bitter like some of the rns i've work in the past. what happened to being a florence n? is this behavior change normal? i think someone should do a case study on this and find out!!!!! i think nursing schools should be upfront with their students about the working conditions of being a nurse and not just profit driven. i dont think our working conditions is not going to get better anytime soon. sorry...especially with the current recession, its just going to get worse ($$$$ talks).
    my solution, transfer to a unit that you like best with less backstabbing nurses who eats their young (goodluck on that!). or go back to school, get your masters degree (np, cns, etc.) equals less dirty work, less patient contact, work regular 8 hour job, lots of respect, have your own office, happy stomach and smiley bladder, and less b*****.
    sorry for being too honest.
    it's obvious that you aren't cut out for bedside nursing. we're all happy that you're in a private office with a happy stomach, smiley bladder, no dirty work and less patient contact. really, that's where you should be. if you're unable to see the rewards of bedside nursing for the pitfalls, you shouldn't be a bedside nurse. as for respect -- i get plenty of respect from those i work with. perhaps you didn't get any as a bedside nurse because you hadn't earned it yet.
  7. by   dlatimer
    Quote from ruby vee
    it's obvious that you aren't cut out for bedside nursing. we're all happy that you're in a private office with a happy stomach, smiley bladder, no dirty work and less patient contact. really, that's where you should be. if you're unable to see the rewards of bedside nursing for the pitfalls, you shouldn't be a bedside nurse. as for respect -- i get plenty of respect from those i work with. perhaps you didn't get any as a bedside nurse because you hadn't earned it yet.
    speaking for myself, i can't know anyone's experience in bedside nursing and i have known nursing units that are exactly as ty described. my experiences are are mine alone and my perspective is influenced by my expectations and values that may not be shared by my co-workers.

    this thread is beneficial to those who appreciate the place to ventilate and validate their views. i hope that by sharing these views a consensus can be found that can assist in coping with the way things are and changing nursing to be the compassionate, caring and helpful profession that it should be. but, that is only my opinion.
    Last edit by dlatimer on Jul 15, '10 : Reason: spelling
  8. by   Designer NP
    Quote from ruby vee
    it's obvious that you aren't cut out for bedside nursing. we're all happy that you're in a private office with a happy stomach, smiley bladder, no dirty work and less patient contact. really, that's where you should be. if you're unable to see the rewards of bedside nursing for the pitfalls, you shouldn't be a bedside nurse. as for respect -- i get plenty of respect from those i work with. perhaps you didn't get any as a bedside nurse because you hadn't earned it yet.
    wow ruby, you sound like one of those bitter older nurses who eats their young.
  9. by   Ruby Vee
    Quote from nursecutie
    wow ruby, you sound like one of those bitter older nurses who eats their young.
    thank you.
  10. by   kgh31386
    I'm not sure about all the people who say that nurses on their floor eat their young...but I work on a floor of a lot of older nurses, and new grads. Not to mention that when I work, I'm usually the only guy and I'm still a new grad. All of the nurses, old and young, always ask me if I need help and are there making me feel like part of the team. Now whoever says that nursing school is just profit driven and doesn't really show you what nursing is about, those students must not have taken clinical seriously, their school is no good, or they just floated by(not talking about EVERYONE, but some). My first clinical day we were in there changing people, bathing, cleaning ,etc. By the time my last semester came around, we had 5-6 pts all to ourselves(190 leadership hours). The preceptor would assume we had the knowledge from previous semesters, and it was all on us to delegate, call MD's etc. If you didn't realize that's how nursing was by the time you got there...someone must have missed the boat during school or just plain forgotten as they went along.

    I just don't understand why would you even go to nursing school if you don't really know what the job is all about??? It's not a good idea to make assumptions about something big like a career choice(not saying everyone did, but again some do) A lot of people say that they will "transfer to ICU, or this place or that", but the bottom line is nursing is nursing. I hear SEVERAL people say "I hate poop, I'm gonna go to ICU where I have 2 patients". I saw more more poop cleaned by nurses in ICU than on the Rehab floors with elderly patients, again that assumption will get you.
  11. by   NotReady4PrimeTime
    Quote from kgh31386
    I just don't understand why would you even go to nursing school if you don't really know what the job is all about??? It's not a good idea to make assumptions about something big like a career choice(not saying everyone did, but again some do) A lot of people say that they will "transfer to ICU, or this place or that", but the bottom line is nursing is nursing. I hear SEVERAL people say "I hate poop, I'm gonna go to ICU where I have 2 patients". I saw more more poop cleaned by nurses in ICU than on the Rehab floors with elderly patients, again that assumption will get you.
    Your comment about assumptions resonates on several levels for me. I've lost count of the new grads I've encountered over the years who make assumptions about their own place in the hierarchy, developing a personal fable that they're somehow special and that they can have what everybody else wants just by virtue of the fact that they have a degree. I am not someone who treats others badly... in fact I'm the one new nurses come to with their questions and concerns and to get help from. Having said that, it sets my teeth on edge when I hear someone new say things like, "Well, I'm NOT working Christmas," "I have no intention of working nights, someone else can do it," and "I'm getting married at the end of July. If they won't give me three weeks off for my wedding and honeymoon then I'll just go casual." How can they be doing their clinicals on the floors during vacation planning and not know how the process works? Here it's all about seniority - and I can't have vacation during the summer after 16 years on the job so why should they just walk onto the unit and make that kind of demand?

    Then there are the ones who come to PICU thinking that they'll have it easy, one patient - maybe two - sedated and ventilated so they can sit on a chair and read a novel, or plan their next tropical vacation while the people around them are working their butts off with unstable patients. Then they're complaining that they always get the floor-ready kids who are a LOT more work. But that's where your level of competence lies right now, honey.

    Quote from dlatimer
    This thread is beneficial to those who appreciate the place to ventilate and validate their views. I hope that by sharing these views a consensus can be found that can assist in coping with the way things are and changing nursing to be the compassionate, caring and helpful profession that it should be. But, that is only my opinion.
    There's nothing that says people with opposing views shouldn't be allowed to benefit from the opportunity to ventilate and be validated. The harsh reality is that the majority of new nursing grads are going to have to spend some time at the bedside, working nights, weekends and holidays, missing social events, getting their hands dirty and hurting their backs. They need to realise that it isn't a conspiracy against them but a fact of life. If that kind of work doesn't appeal to them then they should be choosing another profession.
  12. by   Ruby Vee
    Quote from janfrn
    your comment about assumptions resonates on several levels for me. i've lost count of the new grads i've encountered over the years who make assumptions about their own place in the hierarchy, developing a personal fable that they're somehow special and that they can have what everybody else wants just by virtue of the fact that they have a degree. i am not someone who treats others badly... in fact i'm the one new nurses come to with their questions and concerns and to get help from. having said that, it sets my teeth on edge when i hear someone new say things like, "well, i'm not working christmas," "i have no intention of working nights, someone else can do it," and "i'm getting married at the end of july. if they won't give me three weeks off for my wedding and honeymoon then i'll just go casual." how can they be doing their clinicals on the floors during vacation planning and not know how the process works? here it's all about seniority - and i can't have vacation during the summer after 16 years on the job so why should they just walk onto the unit and make that kind of demand?
    despite what seems to be the popular opinion of new nurses, nursing students and about-to-be nursing students on threads such as these, i am also one of the senior nurses that the students and new grads seek out to answer questions for them. as far as i know, no one that i know personally has ever believed that i'm a "young eater." if there were such a thing.

    i frequently see new grads make statements like the above -- prefaced by saying "i'm only working hear while i go to school for my np" or "i'm just doing the least icu i can do before i go to anesthesia school." despite our manager's clearly stated policy that she will not be giving recommendations to anyone who doesn't work in our icu a minimum of two years after getting off orientation, there are still those new grads who apply to crna programs a mere year after they've started working here, even though that's often not even six months off orientation. i wish i had a dollar for every new grad that's come to me or some of my peers asking for a letter of recommendation because they're so shocked that no one on the management team will give them one. they'll insist that our manager is a nasty old (bad word meaning female dog) and that this is a prime example of "nurses eating their young" because they "don't want anyone to get ahead." if they can find someone else to write a letter for them, they'll do it. and at least one girl that i knew of got into graduate school without any letters of recommendation from the workplace by virtue of asking her grandparents to endow a chair . . . .

    because i work in a well-known hospital, we often get new graduates fresh from prestigious nursing schools or whose parents and grand-parents have contributed large amounts of money either to our hospital or the nursing school. there are exceptions, of course, but many of them feel that they shouldn't have to work nights, weekends, holidays or do anything difficult before they inevitably move on. starting in july, before they're even a month into orientation, some of these new employees are making statements such as "i'm not working new year's eve -- i have a social life." and "i can't work christmas -- i have a family." they also don't want to clean up poop, deal with difficult families or miss a weekend at the beach. it seems to be the rare new grad who comes to the icu because they really want to take care of icu patients. we hire between 16 and 52 new grads a year, and usually only a few stay. it isn't because this is such a horrible place to work -- most of them start with the intention of just marking time until they get their advanced degrees.

    Quote from janfrn
    then there are the ones who come to picu thinking that they'll have it easy, one patient - maybe two - sedated and ventilated so they can sit on a chair and read a novel, or plan their next tropical vacation while the people around them are working their butts off with unstable patients. then they're complaining that they always get the floor-ready kids who are a lot more work. but that's where your level of competence lies right now, honey.


    there's nothing that says people with opposing views shouldn't be allowed to benefit from the opportunity to ventilate and be validated. the harsh reality is that the majority of new nursing grads are going to have to spend some time at the bedside, working nights, weekends and holidays, missing social events, getting their hands dirty and hurting their backs. they need to realise that it isn't a conspiracy against them but a fact of life. if that kind of work doesn't appeal to them then they should be choosing another profession.
    but it seems that very few new nursing graduates enter the profession prepared for working nights, weekends, holidays and doing the dirty work and back breaking labor associated with the job. perhaps my view is skewed because my unit is "a feeder unit" for anesthesia school, but most of the new graduates i've met have no idea what they're going to have to do to get that year of experience. it starts while they're still in hospital orientation, before they set foot on the unit in scrubs. "i'm getting married and i need three weeks off in july for the wedding and honeymoon, and i need every weekend in june off for the parties and i can't work christmas because my whole family is getting together." they're often the same new grads who claim that "the bitter old hags" are eating them because they're so much younger and more beautiful. and the ones who spend most of their shift flirting with the residents who, since the influx of mid-level providers into the icu, have nothing much to do.

    i'm not sure why it is, but this seems to be a relatively recent turn of events; perhaps in the last 10 to 15 years. in fact, all of the nurses i know who work in the icu because they want to work in the icu and do the actual work of the icu started more than ten years ago. that's frightening. and sad.

    Last edit by Ruby Vee on Jul 19, '10 : Reason: Increasing font size for the benefit of those of us with presbyopia
  13. by   NotReady4PrimeTime
    I hear you, Ruby! It seems to be a universal malady. Our unit isn't a feeder unit for anesthesia school (Canada doesn't really have nurse anesthetists) but we've spawned a number of NPs and Master's prepared nurses who are now biding their time until they can put their advanced degrees to use. One has been accepted to law school and hopes to go into med-mal... wonder where that desire came from?

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