Have a stupid stupid stupid question

  1. we had a new hire pharmacology test today. more than half of the class failed it today. I feel really bad about it but what can you do but review what you missed, and try again. We could not remember how calculate fluid intake for eight hours. I did not dawn on me until I walked out of the building.

    All I am looking for is an example of a calculation. So if someone could come up with a some sort of pt with fluid intake for eight hours. and the steps to get to the answer it will be appreciated. we are all getting together tomorrow to go over the ones we missed.

    thanks.
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    About Blackbuttafly

    Joined: Mar '08; Posts: 7; Likes: 1

    7 Comments

  3. by   ghillbert
    I don't know what you mean exactly. If you can elaborate, someone could maybe help.
  4. by   Blackbuttafly
    sorry.
    ex: pt had 150ml of h2o, 200cc of IV, 60ml of grape juice all for eight hours. we want to know the total?
  5. by   Bumashes
    Um, maybe I'm just being an idiot, but, don't you just add them all together? I mean, 1ml = 1cc. So, just add them:

    150ml + 200cc + 60ml = 410cc or 410 ml.

    Depends on whether you want to express it in ml or cc.

    Don't worry about the question. Sometimes I get in such a hurry that I can't add 2 + 2!
  6. by   Blackbuttafly
    yeah that is what i thought but the lady was like you multiply by eight because it was an eight hour shift. She would not work it out, so I just figured add them all together for whatever you record on that shift.
    .
  7. by   llg
    Perhaps the question was not asking for just the "total amount for 8 hours."

    Perhaps it was asking you to calculate "the amount per kilo over 8 hours" in which case you would take the total amount consumed and divide it by the patient's weight.

    It also may have asked you to calculate the "average fluid consumption per hour" in which you would take the total amount consumed and divide that by the number of hours.

    On those types of tests, you have to be sure to read the problem carefully and pay close attention to the specific thing that it is asking you to calculate. That's where a lot of mistakes happen in the clinical setting -- and that's why a lot of orientation tests include those types of questions. People carelessly use a "standard formula" to calculate things without carefully reading the question and come up with the wrong answer. They do the same in real life, functioning somewhat on autopilot and not paying attention to details, and medication or fluid errors result.

    So ... my recommendation is to pay special attention to those kinds of details to avoid those types of errors on the test (and in actual practice).
  8. by   Bobylon
    Quote from llg
    On those types of tests, you have to be sure to read the problem carefully and pay close attention to the specific thing that it is asking you to calculate. That's where a lot of mistakes happen in the clinical setting -- and that's why a lot of orientation tests include those types of questions. People carelessly use a "standard formula" to calculate things without carefully reading the question and come up with the wrong answer. They do the same in real life, functioning somewhat on autopilot and not paying attention to details, and medication or fluid errors result.

    So ... my recommendation is to pay special attention to those kinds of details to avoid those types of errors on the test (and in actual practice).
    Couldn't have said it better !!! I have always read test questions 2x (or more ) just to be sure...... same with calculating I&Os, med passes, whatever. Better to be safe than sorry...
  9. by   Blackbuttafly
    Thanks to all who have replied.

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