Everyone is asking for experience

  1. But where can we get it, if they do not give it to us, every facility is looking for us to get experience from somewhere else before they can hire us, but with all the nursing shortage, how can facilities do that, I think IMHO, that they are the ones that are causing the nursing shortage, because they refuse to hire people without experience, let me hear you guys on this, I live in NY.
  2. Visit RNKay31 profile page

    About RNKay31

    Joined: Aug '04; Posts: 986; Likes: 14
    First year in Nursing
    Specialty: Clinical exp in OB, psy, med-surg, peds

    9 Comments

  3. by   mvanz9999
    I think that's just the nature of the beast. The old chicken and egg question. Everyplace wants you to have experience before they hire you, yet you cannot get experience until someone hires you. Despite the shortage, I think this will always be the case.

    I've experienced it, my sister is a lawyer and she's been looking for work for nearly a year.

    I would find out where new grads are going in your area and try to apply for a job that is new-grad friendly in a place that frequently hires new grads.
    Last edit by mvanz9999 on Sep 28, '06
  4. by   doublej
    The sad thing is that after you have years and years of experience, they gently move you to the rear because your methods are outdated and your declining flexibility is not what is needed today.
  5. by   RNKay31
    Thakns guys for your replies, I guess it is a very hard thing for the new grads
  6. by   llg
    New grads have special learning needs. Some hospitals may have special orientation programs for new grads, but only offer them at certain times of the year. It may be that some of those places that are not hiring new grads at the moment will welcome new grads at other times. That's why it is important for students to investigate the hiring practices of the employers in your area well before graduation. There might be certain "windows of opportunity" that are available only during certain times.

    Another possibility is that you may find that while a hospital may say "experience preferred," that they will consider a new grad if they are unsatisfied with the experienced nurses who apply.

    Finally, you may simply be applying for the wrong jobs. Some types of nursing jobs are not likely to be offered to a new grad under any circumstances because the job requires the nurse to exercise sophisticated judgement and/or work fairly autonomously. A wise employer will always seek an experienced RN for such a position. Other positions offer such attractive hours and/or working conditions that the employer can pick and choose among several experienced applicants -- even during a nursing shortage. They may therefore choose not to invest in the resources necessary to meet a new grad's special needs and instead, hire only experienced nurses because it is more economical to do so. It would be unrealistic for a new grad to be offered such a job.

    Of course, I don't know the specific situation in your case. But these are some of the reasons why it can be difficult for a new grad to find that "perfect dream job" or even a "good job" immediately after graduation in spite of the nursing shortage. During a shortage, employers have to be particularly careful with the investment of their resources.

    If I were you, I would investigate the situation fully by speaking with experts on the employment situation in your area -- people like the local hospitals' Nurse Recruiters and nurse managers. There may be some people at the local nursing schools who deal with this issue on a regular basis who could also clue you in on the specifics in your region.

    What I would definitely NOT do is simply fill out applications online and wait for someone to contact you. I would be calling on the phone, setting up appointments to talk with people, etc. to let them get to know me and to give me an opportunity to ask their advice even if they have no job to offer me.

    Good luck,
    llg
  7. by   RNKay31
    Thank you so much llg, for your unbelievable input, you are a great person, all the best to you, I have just receive a phone call for a job in a community care setting, do you think this is good for a new grad, please let me know.
  8. by   traumahawk99
    i started in long term care. after a total of 4 orientation shifts, i was out there on the floor with up to 37 patients, a monsterous medpass and it was sink or swim! luckily, i swam. but in 3 months i gained a lot of experience and confidence.

    one thing that cannot be stressed too much is organization and time management.

    i've been offered a job at every place i've applied to. you'll find you can work about as many hours as you can stay awake .
  9. by   willdgate
    Yeah, it is hard for new nurses to find employment, unless you get on with the hospital that you interned with while in school. I got a job in the smallest hospital, before ever getting a call back from a larger one, go figure.
  10. by   RNKay31
    Wow guys this is mad scarry, 1 nurse 37 patients, OMG, willdgate I guess the larger ones are looking for years of experience, wow so sad to know, anyways thanks guys for you all input.
  11. by   caroladybelle
    Quote from llg
    Finally, you may simply be applying for the wrong jobs. Some types of nursing jobs are not likely to be offered to a new grad under any circumstances because the job requires the nurse to exercise sophisticated judgement and/or work fairly autonomously. A wise employer will always seek an experienced RN for such a position. Other positions offer such attractive hours and/or working conditions that the employer can pick and choose among several experienced applicants -- even during a nursing shortage. They may therefore choose not to invest in the resources necessary to meet a new grad's special needs and instead, hire only experienced nurses because it is more economical to do so. It would be unrealistic for a new grad to be offered such a job.

    Of course, I don't know the specific situation in your case. But these are some of the reasons why it can be difficult for a new grad to find that "perfect dream job" or even a "good job" immediately after graduation in spite of the nursing shortage. During a shortage, employers have to be particularly careful with the investment of their resources.
    I agree with this.

    Frequently, a hospital will advertise openings, and SOME will be appropriate for a new grad, but not all. The other issue is going into a unit that has a serious shortage. How will you, as a new grad, be able to orient properly in units that can only have two RNs at night (one being the new grad)?

    Another issue, is that units may hire new grads, but limit how many that they take at a time. A good manager will not hire so many new grads at one time to overrun their resources. This provides a poor/inadequate orientation and may lead to "eating our young".

    The unit has to be able to orient you properly or it does a disservice to you and the facility. It can also seriously stress/discourage the new grad and the staff.

    As a traveler, I frequently get pulled into onco units with a shortage. I cover much of the day to day issues, freeing a staffer to have time to properly orient new grads. This may mean that fewer new grads get a job for 3-6 monthes, until the unit has oriented some of its new staff,has them "up to speed" and can handle more.

    Another issue, is that experience will generally be preferred. The facility wants to see if they can get experienced personnel but will take a new grad, if no one "suitable" applies.

    And lastly, many new grads are applying for positions that are not appropriate or that preferred by all nurses, and will get shifted to low in the queue. Day positions, L&D, Peds, ER, ICU are all popular and senior people with experience are often going to take priority. Sometimes as a new grad, you will have to take a less popular position until you do prove yourself.

    And, no, just because there is a shortage, does not mean that you will have a easier time getting "the perfect job".

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