Did new grads shoot themsves in the foot (are jobs really that scarce?) - page 2

For all the recent grads looking for nursing jobs I have a few questions. What was your GPA (and/or class ranking)? How long after graduation did you take to get your RN? Is everyone in your class... Read More

  1. by   SummerGarden
    Quote from keithjones
    just my opinion here but if there are positions in the hospitals you did clinicals in and you are at the top of your class grade wise and on top of things in clinicals. the hiring people are sure to hear from your instructors. 3.8+ gpa honors is something you put on resumes and if i'm a hiring person i'm gonna ask how you did in school especially if thats the only experience you have.
    you are fooling yourself; maybe you wish to live in denial? you know nothing about nursing if you think that new grads are not getting jobs due to gpa. if you want to be a 4.0 gradate and find out the hard way then do so. stop thinking that something is being over looked by those who are out of work. new grads are out of work because there are no jobs available for the number of students being cranked out of nursing school at this time. everyone is going to nursing school. nursing schools still graduate more people then there are jobs available for inexperienced nurses! that is the bottom line; not 2.90 gpas in pre-reqs, or c averages in nurisng school. 4.0s are out of work too!

    i was very lucky to already be working before i graduated. now, the same people who did the same as me (good grades and worked as a nurse extern prior to graduating) are not being hired from the may 2009 class. the job market is to blame... not the quality of schools, degrees, or students. hospitals can hire experienced nurses and train them cheaper then new grads so that is what they are choosing to do at this time. someday (and no one knows when) the job market will turn around ... i do not think it will be any time soon since nursing schools are popping up everywhere and there is no way the number of new grads will be less then the number of new grad openings any time soon. some say 2-5 years, but i disagree.

    think about it... students entering nursing school now are going to be in trouble because nursing schools are graduating too many students and hospitals have never had as many openings for the number of new grads being cranked out now. for example the local hospitals in my area will hire about 20-40 per year each during the good economy... not 100s... they have never hired 100s per year! how many hospitals take on 100s of new grads per year??? not many... however, there are 100s and 1000s of applicants per hospital new graduate programs per year around this country at a time when hospitals are cutting back on the number of new hires. thus, though there maybe a shortage of experienced nurses in some areas because of poor working conditions of various facilities, there is no shortage of new grads anywhere in this country. even long term care facilities can be picky now in some areas. the nursing shortage is and was all hype!
    Last edit by SummerGarden on May 9, '09
  2. by   shoegalRN
    Quote from Becca76
    It's all in who you know! Sad but true! I've got a 4.0 with a BSN and a pretty impressive resume (if I do say so myself) . But, the thing that helped me for sure get the job I wanted was the people I knew. Good luck to everyone! It's a tough market!!!
    I totally agree with you! The only way I got an interview on the floor I wanted was to have a letter written to the director of that unit on my behalf by my clinical instructor. My clinical instructor "knew" the director and decided to put in a good word for me.

    I am learning that it's not about how much experience you have or lack thereof, it's about the people you know, which is TOTALLY different than the corporate world.......
  3. by   Wsmith16
    Your going to be in for a rude awakening if the job market does not turn by the time you graduate. None of the interviewers have not asked me about my gpa. What is most wanted is that you have yoru license.

    The reality is there is a recession out there it's affecting most of the country & it's affecting healthcare. I suggest you do your research on this. It's not all about the grades frankly--I have seen plenty of "A" students in my group who lack the compassion or the real world knowledge to give pt care. And plenty of "C" students can run circles around them. Completing nursing school is a wonderful accomplshment, what is going on in the job market at this moment has nothing to do with one's grades.

    Nurses are not retiring, many who left are returning....again I suggest you do some research online & pray that by the time you are done with school that things will get better. It probably will.
  4. by   hypocaffeinemia
    The only reason I have a job (just graduated) is because I bugged our ICU director about an internship every day for the last two years (at least). My hospital isn't hiring new grads in any capacity-- I'm the only one.
  5. by   solneeshka
    Quote from nurse2be09
    I totally agree with you! The only way I got an interview on the floor I wanted was to have a letter written to the director of that unit on my behalf by my clinical instructor. My clinical instructor "knew" the director and decided to put in a good word for me.

    I am learning that it's not about how much experience you have or lack thereof, it's about the people you know, which is TOTALLY different than the corporate world.......
    Oh boy, your corporate world was VERY different from mine!
  6. by   shoegalRN
    Quote from solneeshka
    Oh boy, your corporate world was VERY different from mine!
    Yeah, maybe so.

    In my previous career, we didnt do formal interviews to climb the ladder. We were judged by our skills matches and our yearly appraisal ratings. It wasnt based on who you know. It was strictly based on job performance, attendance, and job skill matches and seniority. If one division had 10 openings, they were taking the first 10 best employees who had outstanding yearly ratings, was in good attendance standing, and had seniority.

    All this having to write letters and basically become a stalker to HR is a whole new world to me. But I'm learning quickly.......
  7. by   Crux1024
    Having had applied recently for jobs, I was never ONCE asked for GPA. I showed up with my resume and three letters of reccomendation from instructors touting my cinical skills and willingness to learn, rather than "book" smarts and how well I did on exams.

    I also then received job offers and my GPA sure wasnt a 4.0..

    IF your goal is a 3.8 +, go for it. But PLEASE dont think it makes you better or more qualified than everyone else who got something like a 3.3. In the long run, it really doesnt matter. Just truly learn and try your best to be competent and efficient.

    Good Luck!!
  8. by   dallet6
    I just wanted to agree with the poster that said its more about who you know. I actually recently saw a news show about how in the current economy, all jobs, not just nursing, are much more related to who you know. They are going to hire someone that they know will give the performance they are looking for. Also, if you have any type of familiarity with their setting, that's slightly less training you'll need.

    Question from me now--I know ltc facilities are always hiring cnas and such, is it easier to get a RN job at one of those than a hospital? I really don't have a desire to do LTC, but if that's what you gotta do just to do something...well..you gotta do what you gotta do.
  9. by   Kevin RN08
    To answer the question ... Jobs are scarce in many areas, a willingness to relocate, extend your commuting distance, or forego your "dream job" may be in order.
    My advice to anyone still in school is to get a position as an aide or carepartner while you are in school. In my class of 60 the 10-15 people that took this route are the only ones with jobs and we have all had multiple interviews/offers from our respective hospitals. I will add that most of us are in the middle of the pack (2.8-3.2ish) GPA wise; this may be considered "who you know", but it is merit based you took an opportunity to show your stuff, prove you are a team player and integrate yourself into a team and most of all see internal job postings.

    Advice for the other new grads ... look at your resume, look at it long and hard. Does it show that you are a team player? A nurse manager doesn't care that I managed all of the repair parts and a $49M budget for a ship, they want to know that I set up a training plan and all of my guys advanced when I was in the Navy. Does it show a willingness to change and a desire to learn and grow? Does it show progressive career growth? Does it show loyalty? Are you using a one size fits all resume, or are you looking at the desired Hospital's Nursing webpage or brochures and pulling THEIR buzz words for inclusion to each resume and coverletter? Who has critiqued your resume, an instructor that hasn't looked for a Nursing job in 20 years or a Nurse Manager or Supervisor? Ask an adjunct clinical instructor for advice, they are normally actively working as nurses and connected on multiple floors.

    Best of luck
    Last edit by Kevin RN08 on May 10, '09
  10. by   shoegalRN
    Quote from axshusz
    To answer the question ... Jobs are scarce in many areas, a willingness to relocate, extend your commuting distance, or forego your "dream job" may be in order.
    My advice to anyone still in school is to get a position as an aide or carepartner while you are in school. In my class of 60 the 10-15 people that took this route are the only ones with jobs and we have all had multiple interviews/offers from our respective hospitals. I will add that most of us are in the middle of the pack (2.8-3.2ish) GPA wise; this may be considered "who you know", but it is merit based you took an opportunity to show your stuff, prove you are a team player and integrate yourself into a team and most of all see internal job postings.

    Advice for the other new grads ... look at your resume, look at it long and hard. Does it show that you are a team player? A nurse manager doesn't care that I managed all of the repair parts and a $49M budget for a ship, they want to know that I set up a training plan and all of my guys advanced when I was in the Navy. Does it show a willingness to change and a desire to learn and grow? Does it show progressive career growth? Does it show loyalty? Are you using a one size fits all resume, or are you looking at the desired Hospital's Nursing webpage or brochures and pulling THEIR buzz words for inclusion to each resume and coverletter? Who has critiqued your resume, an instructor that hasn't looked for a Nursing job in 20 years or a Nurse Manager or Supervisor? Ask an adjunct clinical instructor for advice, they are normally actively working as nurses and connected on multiple floors.

    Best of luck
    I certainly agree with everything you wrote! When I redone my resume, I had a charge nurse and a nurse manager look at it. I also tailored it to show I was a team player, I was a multi-tasker, I know how to priortize, I have good time management skills, I know how to communicate, and I know how to resolve conflict. All of this with my previous career and various departments I worked at in my previous career. I had an interview on Friday and the nurse manager said she was impressed with my resume. Although it was two pages long, it was okay because it hit every key point that tied my previous career with nursing.

    I was also a Nurse Intern in the hospital system and I took in my yearly evaluation that showed I was a good team player, along with being flexible to change. I was a Nurse Intern on the unit I was applying to, just in a different hospital within the system.

    Sometimes, even being a CNA or a Tech don't guarantee you a RN job. I was laid off from my PRN position as a Nurse Intern and then was told they were not hiring any new grads, so I was forced to look elsewhere.

    It's just a crappy time for the economy in general.

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