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Feeling Depressed at Current Job - Would it Look Bad on Resume to Resign?

Nurses   (185 Views | 7 Replies)

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I am currently working at a special needs center in a residential facility. When I first heard the job description, it made me uncomfortable because I thought it would be a lot to handle as a new grad to care for up to 20 residents as the sole nurse overnight. Now that I'm doing the job, it's actually the opposite. I find myself with hours to kill. This place really doesn't need nurses to do 12 hour shifts; they could break it up to three 8 hour shifts. I'm really not even using my RN license either because everything I do could be done by an LPN. This place even does hire LPN's to do the same job. It's basically the same routine, meds and tasks. 

I really don't want to come across as ungrateful or unmotivated. I'm actually very driven and I crave learning more!! I used to be scared of the hospital, thinking I couldn't perform nursing tasks there. I thought I would be stressed and make mistakes. This job is proving to me that I CAN do well in a fast-paced environment and I'm itching to learn more and be busier! Some nurses are content with this facility, but that may be because many of them are older in the retirement age of their lives and have no need or desire for faster paced work or new skills. As a new nurse, I feel like I'm going crazy there! At times I would literally watch the clock tick. I'm often sleep-deprived and overnight shifts are not for me. Some do really well with nights; I'm just not one of them, so I often feel like I could sleep nearly my whole shift. One night was so bad with tiredness, I nodded off. I tried to do things to keep me awake like exercising...I even strung paperclips together to just do something hands-on to keep my mind active. The tiredness wouldn't really leave though. Working on my BSN or spending time on my phone are off limits too because there are policies against working on "personal work" and using your phone during work hours.

I've started to become depressed at this job and feel anxious when I have to return to work, not anxious about unpredictable events occurring, which is probably how many nurses feel, but anxious that I have to be there and face another repetitive predictable night. I'm worried that I'm having a bad attitude about working here and the thought of leaving adds a layer of guilt on me. With almost any other job, it's just a job, but with nursing I feel like there is so much tied to it like caring and compassion, so I feel like it must mean I don't care enough about these individuals if I want to leave. Maybe that sounds ridiculous. 

In my circumstance, I don't *have* to work, I choose to, so it's not like I would be facing the streets or stacks of unpaid bills if I leave. I'm concerned that one, if I do leave it would look bad on my resume if I resigned after 3 months and two, that I just don't have what it takes and a poor work ethic for feeling like I mentally can't handle it. Of course if I left, I would devote time into actively pursuing other positions, working on my bachelor's degree (which I am currently doing), perhaps gaining some certifications and just figuring out how I want to channel my nursing endeavors. 

I just really don't know. I don't want to make a stupid move career-wise, especially for being a new grad, yet I don't know if I can take too many more months of this. I've been applying to other jobs, even got a call back from a hospital nurse recruiter but my application got rejected anyway. It's really hard to find something without a BSN. I also don't want to stay here long because I heard it can be hard to be looked on favorably after working at this sort of facility, I suppose because of how limited it is in growth and learning.

Let me know your thoughts!!



 

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llg has 43 years experience as a PhD, RN and specializes in Nursing Professional Development.

6 Followers; 13,271 Posts; 59,593 Profile Views

Start looking for a new job now ... but don't resign until you have the new job for sure.   That's a basic principle that is generally good follow:  Don't resign your current job before you have the next job all lined up for sure.

Another basic principle is:   "It's usually easier to get a job if you already have a job."   Job hunters who are out of work struggle a little more to find a job sometimes because they appear (rightly or wrongly) to have failed at their previous one.  When you have a job, you appear (rightly or wrongly) to be successful and capable -- making you a more attractive candidate.

Who knows, you might find a new job in just a couple of weeks and you won't have to stay long at this job you don't like?   And the act of hunting for a new job may "perk you up" a bit to help you get through the next month of job hunting.

 

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ivyleaf has 13 years experience and specializes in Ambulatory Case Management, Clinic, Psychiatry.

346 Posts; 9,405 Profile Views

Everything the previous poster said. Start applying. 

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Davey Do has 41 years experience and specializes in Psych, CD, HH, Admin, LTC, OR, ER, Med Surge.

15 Followers; 1 Article; 6,479 Posts; 80,579 Profile Views

5 hours ago, Elven_RN said:

 I thought it would be a lot to handle as a new grad to care for up to 20 residents as the sole nurse overnight. Now that I'm doing the job, it's actually the opposite.

Your feelings are understandable, Elven_RN! As a new nurse, I wanted to sink my teeth into something medical and challenged my abilities.

I admire your self-examination and problem-solving method of gathering data before making a major move. Especially, since you say, you don't need to work!

5 hours ago, Elven_RN said:

Some nurses are content with this facility, but that may be because many of them are older in the retirement age of their lives and have no need or desire for faster paced work or new skills. As a new nurse, I feel like I'm going crazy there!

I copied this portion of your post because it shows a realistic perspective with we older nurses and reinforces the perspective that you want and need something more challenging.

 I echo llg's advice and wish you the best in your endeavors, Elven_RN!

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nznurse93 has 3 years experience as a BSN.

295 Posts; 3,318 Profile Views

Agree. Look for a job now, before leaving. As tempting as it is to leave, it won’t look good on your cv. 
 

im In a similar position. I’m so desperate to leave my job, each day things feel worse. And any good points about my current job have well and truely faded away. But each job application I put in gives me a little bit of hope. Soon this will be over and I’ll be glad I stuck out. 

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12 Followers; 3,938 Posts; 29,913 Profile Views

8 hours ago, Elven_RN said:

With almost any other job, it's just a job, but with nursing I feel like there is so much tied to it like caring and compassion, so I feel like it must mean I don't care enough about these individuals if I want to leave.

I do suggest getting over that pronto along with most other forms of nurse-guilt, which should just cease to exist.

Start putting out lots of apps and resign from this job after you've secured a different one, as advised above. Good luck!

 

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TriciaJ has 39 years experience as a RN and specializes in Psych, Corrections, Med-Surg, Ambulatory.

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First of all, are you sure there isn't more you could be doing at work?  How about canvass the day staff:  is there anything that would help their shift get off to a better start?

Nothing frosted my cookies more than the previous shift complaining of boredom, then finding all manner of dropped balls to stop me in my tracks.  Is the whole place spotless?  The cupboards and drawers all meticulously organized?  The fridge and microwave pristine?

I know those tasks don't require a nursing education.  But when you do find the next job, you will get a much more glowing reference.  Good luck.

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3 Followers; 37,147 Posts; 98,909 Profile Views

I see nothing wrong with taking time out to complete your degree. Perfectly good reason or even ‘reason’ if you see my wink. However if I were you I would not resign unless you are very sure you have given job hunting your best shot. 

2 hours ago, TriciaJ said:

First of all, are you sure there isn't more you could be doing at work?  How about canvass the day staff:  is there anything that would help their shift get off to a better start?

Nothing frosted my cookies more than the previous shift complaining of boredom, then finding all manner of dropped balls to stop me in my tracks.  Is the whole place spotless?  The cupboards and drawers all meticulously organized?  The fridge and microwave pristine?

I know those tasks don't require a nursing education.  But when you do find the next job, you will get a much more glowing reference.  Good luck.

TriciaJ, only wish I could find coworkers like you. 

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