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Experienced nurse changed unit and now not getting good feedback from a preceptor

Nurses   (921 Views 7 Comments)
by Lovelyrn14 Lovelyrn14 (New Member) New Member

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Pleas tell me what you guys think. I am an experienced nurse, started on med surg 2 years ago, currently on call school nurse and working in a hospital as an RN. I got the job in cardiac setting as I feel like I need to step up and try other unit higher than the general floor. So my preceptor has over a year experience in this new floor where I'm at. During orientation, I listen and do things that she wants to be done, basically following her and listening to her as she has been on that floor, as an experienced nurse I know how to passed medications, my routine such as assessment first/vitals before giving meds etc. However, one night she was quizzing me on medications that I am not familiar with, though I know how to look things up, she did not like that answer "I am not sure, I will look!", she got snappy and told me I don't get it. Asked me question about ECG and I wasn't sure about the correct answer though on top of my head I know the answer as I passed the competency, so she judged me and told me that I do not know my ECG! Which is heart breaking! Not that! I told her to sit down, I'll do the work, I got a mistake by skipping my routine so I gave the bp medicine without checking blood pressure (last BP check was forty minutes ago). Offcourse my confidence are all gone and made a mistake as she's telling me what to do. She's always around and I feel like she does not trust me. shethinks I'm an experienced nurse and should know everything which in my point I'm new to this unit, different cases and different routine. Since my confidence are all gone, I screwed up in a report that I just stutter and so there she is told me in front of other nurses that I'm all over. Very horrible experienced! I know how to look things up and use resources. I do not have problem like this with different preceptors. Also, at the end of our shift she told me, she do not believe I have the critical thinking and not able to put things together. So I'm not sure if it is me or my preceptor, I don't wanna go to manager and educator because they like this nurse, she's good and knowledgeable. Any suggestion nurses? My confidence is now down and I am so bummed as this is affecting my practice. I have the experienced but I don't think this preceptor wil let me finish my orientation.

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NICU Guy has 4 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in NICU.

1 Follower; 3,490 Posts; 31,787 Profile Views

So my preceptor has over a year experience in this new floor where I'm at.. So I'm not sure if it is me or my preceptor, I don't wanna go to manager and educator because they like this nurse, she's good and knowledgeable.

So you are saying that your preceptor only has one year of experience???? Why would someone with only 1 yr experience be precepting? I don't think I could have effectively precepted anyone until I had at least 2 yrs experience. So, yes it is your preceptor's inability to be an effective preceptor. She is trying to be an all-knowing nurse by trying to knock you down when you don't have the answer at the tip of your tongue.

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Are you a credible source? Add your Credentials, Experience, etc.

1,381 Posts; 10,490 Profile Views

Also for most BP meds, unless the BP has been unstable, I would not recheck the BP before giving if the BP was checked within the hour.

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rkitty198 has 11 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Med Surge, Tele, Oncology, Wound Care.

420 Posts; 6,042 Profile Views

She is too new into her own career to feel the confidence to precept others and is prjecting that onto you. A good preceptor (confident in their own skills) wont flaunt what they know, give you time for learning (non-judgemental) and will give you space. Before things get worse, I would talk to the manager to get a new preceptor. You could say that her teaching style is not empowering to your learning style. This girl might need a slice of humble pie before she should start precepting.

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Sour Lemon has 9 years experience.

2 Followers; 4,206 Posts; 30,212 Profile Views

I've precepted with one year of experience. Sometimes, it's actually better ...because you know a little bit more than the preceptee, but you can still remember what it's like to be new and relate to their experience. The preceptee also gets the benefit of observing that it's OK (and wise) to seek help from superiors and utilize other resources when needed.

Your preceptor doesn't seem to be getting you to where you need to be, though. I would talk to the manager, say lots of nice things about the preceptor, and also express concern that you may have different styles of teaching/learning. Advocate for yourself before it's too late.

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AJJKRN has 6+ years experience and specializes in Medical-Surgical/Float Pool/Stepdown.

1,224 Posts; 21,022 Profile Views

While I do agree that you can have just a year in and become a good preceptor (become being the magic word), it really depends on the preceptors personality. Not that the orientees personality isn't part of it as well.

It may just be me but I'm curious if English is your second language? Your preceptor may be confusing your mannerisms with a lack of knowledge when that's most likely not the case (none of us are there so we really don't know). This is a huge generalization but for the sake of example, some cultures tend to be more quiet and respectful when faced with criticism and other cultures tend to be more vocal and defensive/reactive. This applies to personalities too, like extroverts and introverts.

Either way, try your best to not beat yourself up over this preceptors actions. You're a nurse, not a student, and you have experience. Trust your experience and knowledge and build on it to perform at your expectations. One of my favorite sayings is time and turnover tends to heal all in nursing. Just think about if this preceptor leaves the unit later on or you find out that they were done the same way during their orientation. You never know.

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Nurse_ has 7 years experience and specializes in Trauma | Surgical ICU.

251 Posts; 6,042 Profile Views

Someone who may be a very good clinical nurse does not always equate to being a good preceptor.

You have to tell this to your manager. Be objective and do not make this about the criticisms she told you. Let your manager know that maybe your learning and her teaching method isn't compatible and that you'd like to try another preceptor.

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