Jump to content

Exit interview survey, tell the truth, lie or ignore

Nurses   (2,210 Views 47 Comments)
by Forest2 Forest2 (Member)

2,253 Visitors; 437 Posts

advertisement

Would you fill out and return an exit interview survey to a past employer?  If you would, dare you be truthful. Would you ignore it?  Would you be politically correct?  They want to know how you rate the department, the supervisor, the organization as a whole, why you left, what you liked most, hated the most, etc.  It was a bad experience and I hate to even mention what went on there.  But, of course, management thinks everything is wonderful and I am sure they are not going to like the truth.  Why should I answer it when it won't make any difference?

I wonder if anyone ever even reads them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1,207 Visitors; 36 Posts

This is a good topic! I believe all employers’ exit interviews should be done electronically so that people can feel comfortable speaking their mind about the organization they chose to leave. I think you should fill it out and be honest. Things don’t improve without constructive honest feedback. The employer will definitely read it. Whether they enact change because of it is another story 🤗

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

3 Followers; 96,591 Visitors; 36,686 Posts

I usually ignore surveys and polls from employers, past and present, as there is no way to guarantee anonymity and one never knows how the retaliation bug will bite.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

JadedCPN has 13 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Pediatrics, Pediatric Float, PICU, NICU.

1 Follower; 7,122 Visitors; 671 Posts

I know at my current facility, they do electronic exit surveys and "lump" all exit survey results into biannual feedback, which provides some level on annonymity. Whereas if I did an exit interview right now and the feedback went to my employer this week, it would be obvious (despite it being "annonymous") that I was the one who provided the feedback considering I was the only one who left this week.

I think if worded in a constructive way that still maintains professionalism, exit interviews could be very beneficial. But as the poster above said, it is out of your hands as to whether they actually enact any changes based on what you said.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

4 Followers; 18,363 Visitors; 2,835 Posts

Waste of time. They don’t really care. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

6,613 Visitors; 619 Posts

Nope. No way. If they cared, they engage staff before they quit. And even then, I won’t tell the truth to their face. Been there, don’t that. Got the t-shirt. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

2,253 Visitors; 437 Posts

so far more "No's" than "Yes's".  I would like to answer it with brutal honesty, but I don't think it's a good idea.  I mean I don't think they'd appreciate the truth.  Easier to pretend and not see what is really going on instead of actually doing something about it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

not.done.yet has 8 years experience as a MSN, RN and specializes in Critical Care; Cardiac; Professional Development.

4 Followers; 44,617 Visitors; 5,523 Posts

Any time you preface something with "brutal" you can assume it isn't a good thing. 😉 If you feel so bitter that you cannot maintain professionalism it would be best not to answer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Gracefully Saved has 4 years experience as a ADN and specializes in ICU.

142 Visitors; 15 Posts

I was put in this dilemma. I worked at a nursing home when I was an LPN for 6 days before I walked in the managers office and told her I would not be returning. The nurses were incompetent to the point that the patients were in grave danger and mean as hell to the patients. I do NOT believe I’m going for someone job because I do not ever want to take someone’s livelihood. But I did right a report of the things I witnessed because at the end of the day patient safety is my priority. I did not list names but I did detail every dangerous thing I witnessed. The manger did read it and I was told that training and continued education was being planned for the staff. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

9 Followers; 23,242 Visitors; 3,098 Posts

9 minutes ago, not.done.yet said:

Any time you preface something with "brutal" you can assume it isn't a good thing. 😉 If you feel so bitter that you cannot maintain professionalism it would be best not to answer.

I'm pretty sure that means actually reporting what one believes the problems are, as opposed to reporting whatever it is that you will be doing instead of working at that place one day longer.

Bitterness is indeed ill advised -- but that is due to it being non-productive and harmful for the one who harbors it, not because it is not well-earned and deserved.

As for professionalism, what is it when someone leaves because of dangerous, harmful and/or unethical patient care and reports their reason for leaving as, "to pursue another opportunity"?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

not.done.yet has 8 years experience as a MSN, RN and specializes in Critical Care; Cardiac; Professional Development.

4 Followers; 44,617 Visitors; 5,523 Posts

1 hour ago, JKL33 said:

I'm pretty sure that means actually reporting what one believes the problems are, as opposed to reporting whatever it is that you will be doing instead of working at that place one day longer.

Bitterness is indeed ill advised -- but that is due to it being non-productive and harmful for the one who harbors it, not because it is not well-earned and deserved.

As for professionalism, what is it when someone leaves because of dangerous, harmful and/or unethical patient care and reports their reason for leaving as, "to pursue another opportunity"?

Please do not misunderstand. I am not advocating lying as to why one left. I am stating that there are ways to phrase things that communicate concerns on a level that is concise, measurable and without bias. Personal emotions will not be helpful; however, facts and concerns stated in a way that conveys the depth of  the issue without derision, hostility or editorialized commentary will be far more likely to be taken seriously and leave a legal trail should the poor care being observed come to investigation. It would be better not to respond at all than to cloud the response with emotional venting that will muddy the waters around the actual issues.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

9 Followers; 23,242 Visitors; 3,098 Posts

I agree. Your original comment involved a tone of indictment that the above response does not. [If you "feel so bitter"...]. I can see now that's not what you intended. 🙂

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Recently Browsing 0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×