Want the flu? Come to the ER. - page 2

So- We know the flu thing is likely to get worse, which means a lot more ER visits. As I have seen so far, we are more a part of the problem than the solution. Even when people call to ask... Read More

  1. by   rbyrdrn
    Quote from LunahRN
    Okay, this made me laugh so hard I almost choked on my coffee. Ha ha! :smilecoffeecup:

    Yay for masks and obsessive hand-washing! Although it's probably just luck of the draw, overall.
    Yeah is right! My hands are so dry & cracked from my obsessive flu washing that they bleed...which isn't completely bad because my pts think I'm a holy stigmata kind of nurse doing some holy healing, others just freak out and ask for a different nurse.

    But seriously folks....My facility is asking pts/visitors c flu-like s/s to wear a mask, conveniently located at entrances. And we are now excluding children under the age of 12 in pt care areas.
  2. by   hherrn
    Quote from FSK123
    what happened to humanity's common sense? When did people become so dramatic and helpless?



    My son (2 yrs) and I both had the swine flu and we have active high fevers for 4 days and low grade fevers for 2 days. He had a 103.9 temp for over 12 hours, that would not break (tylenol/motrin, cool wash cloths, etc....) and he was lethargic so I took him into the hospital for fluids to lower his temp. I am also 7 months pregos and after having a high fever (103.5) and sweating profusely, I noticed my baby was not very active and that I was dehydrated from dripping sweat. So I also went into the ER for fluids and to check on the baby.

    That is why people go into the ER, they need medical assitance. I wouldn't say I was being dramatic, but I was helpless and needed medical help. I would say that you are not every empathetic, nor do you apply the holistic approach to nursing if you are this judgemental.

    Thank you. It always adds life to a thread when somebody who is not an ER nurse misunderstands the context of a thread and gets offended. If you browse this forum a bit, you will find many equally offensive posts. What you won't find is any anybody supporting anything but top notch care for people with medical emergencies. I assume that you got good care in the ER?

    Please feel free to peruse other posts for empathy deficits and gaps in holistic care. I'd recomend this one for starts: https://allnurses.com/emergency-nurs...ous-70657.html
    Alternately, you could take the opportunity to see what ER nurses talk about amongst themselves, when they aren't filtering the content for outside use. It is similar in any field. What do you suppose teachers talk about when there aren't students or families around?

    Regarding your situation: In general, the best care your child will get is from his/her pediatrician. Always call the office when your child is sick, particularly a problem that has been going for days. The ER doc is not an expert in pediatrics, and doesn't know your child. The pediatrician may well recommend going to the ER.

    Same goes for pregnant mom and obstetrician.

    Calling the doc may save you from an ER visit, and could result in better care. If the situation is so grave you feel the child (or you) will deteriorate in the amount of time it takes a doctor to call you back, call 911. Average ER waiting time is close to 4 hours, most pediatricians and obstetricians call back much faster than that.

    From the wording of your post, I am guessing you might be a student. If so, good luck in your career. If you are really interested in ER nursing, ask an ER nurse about a job shadow. It's a great job, and a great way to help people.

    Oh- LunahRN you are very diplomatic.
  3. by   fiveofpeep
    Here's a perfect example for you about my new fear of the doctor's office and ED in flu season...

    I was throwing up last night x 3 with about 800-1000cc emesis and had epigastric pain 9/10 but there was no way I'd go to the ED last night unless I was on death's doorstep. The last thing I want is to wait with a bunch of people at an inner city ER. And Im glad I did, because it looks like whatever I had dissipated (knock on wood) and at least I dont have the flu now.
  4. by   EmergencyNrse
    Quote from Aymese
    With the exception of small children, the immunocompromised, and the elderly...can someone explain to me why it would occur to someone to go to the ER if you have the flu? I feel like I'm missing something or that I'm an ignorant nurse, but I really don't get it.


    ...what happened to humanity's common sense? When did people become so dramatic and helpless?

    You're right. People have become completely helpless and in some cases incapable of taking care of themselves. In their minds we have the cure for everything! A pill somewhere, somehow will fix it.
    They have watched TV and seen cancer cured in 30 minutes on TV. They can't believe that it takes 45 min just to get their labs back.

    They will complain about having a fever... Well, did you take anything for it? "No"
    Why not try some motrin or tylenol? "They don't work". How do you know if you haven't taken any? ...because, it doesn't.

    I have had people that have come in for sprains that want more and more pain medicine "because it still hurts".
    Well, you're INJURED... it's SUPPOSE to hurt. "Well I can't walk on it" ...it's because YOU'RE HURT. It will continue to hurt and be sore until you HEAL. We can't make you the same way you felt before your injury. No medicine can.

    So many times I get the deer in the headlights look when I tell them that they're going to continue to feel bad for the next 7 days because of their cold or flu. I explain to them how to treat the symptoms but they have no comprehension why we just can't cure them on the spot.


    Meanwhile, their very presence in the ER has exposed them to every other bug, bacteria, virus in the community. I call it job security. We'll see them again really soon... About the time it takes for the incubation period to grow enough bad things to cause their next infection.

    God I love my job.
  5. by   Pixie.RN
    Quote from hherrn
    Oh- LunahRN you are very diplomatic.
    So I've been told. Some days (okay, many!) my brain/mouth filter slips, but very rarely do I allow the brain/fingers/keyboard filter any leeway. LOL
  6. by   Virgo_RN
    We are masking anybody with s/s of ILI in the lobby. Our rooms are private, and anyone presenting with ILI s/s is placed in droplet isolation. Most of our nurses/techs/MDs have been vaccinated for seasonal and H1N1. We are excluding visitors under the age of 12, though those rules are relaxed for patients presenting to the ED who have small children and no options for child care. We've started a new rapid triage system which gets people roomed faster, so there is little to no time spent waiting in the lobby. Prior to the rapid triage system, we used "social distancing" in the lobby. That is, anyone with s/s of ILI was directed to a chair away from other people in the lobby.
    Last edit by Virgo_RN on Nov 18, '09
  7. by   caroladybelle
    I know that this may not help everyone, but.....

    As an Onco/Hemo nurse who works predominantly with leukemias, most good onco/hemo MDs work hard to keep their pts OUT of the ER. The protocol is that they have the pt call the Oncall, who assesses the situation as best as able by phone, and gives instructions and if need be, direct admits to the floor. In most cases, this bypasses the ER, because the last thing a immunosuppressed/cancer pt needs is to sit in the ER. If they have neutropenic fever, by the time that ER gets to them, they could have already been in a comfortable bed, cultures drawn and IV antibiotics started.

    Of course, some cases still go to ER if they are "borderline", not sick enough for admission, but not safe enough to be seen in the office in AM, or to call in a script. But the numbers are much lower.

    Would that all specialists have that dedication.

    Routine DC instructions include encouraging the pt to call service for most (non trauma/immediately critical) symptoms, before proceeding to ER, so that they can bypass ER if possible.
  8. by   nursel56
    Quote from hherrn
    Thank you. It always adds life to a thread when somebody who is not an ER nurse misunderstands the context of a thread and gets offended. If you browse this forum a bit, you will find many equally offensive posts. What you won't find is any anybody supporting anything but top notch care for people with medical emergencies. I assume that you got good care in the ER?

    Please feel free to peruse other posts for empathy deficits and gaps in holistic care. I'd recomend this one for starts: https://allnurses.com/emergency-nurs...ous-70657.html
    Alternately, you could take the opportunity to see what ER nurses talk about amongst themselves, when they aren't filtering the content for outside use. It is similar in any field. What do you suppose teachers talk about when there aren't students or families around?

    Regarding your situation: In general, the best care your child will get is from his/her pediatrician. Always call the office when your child is sick, particularly a problem that has been going for days. The ER doc is not an expert in pediatrics, and doesn't know your child. The pediatrician may well recommend going to the ER.

    Same goes for pregnant mom and obstetrician.

    Calling the doc may save you from an ER visit, and could result in better care. If the situation is so grave you feel the child (or you) will deteriorate in the amount of time it takes a doctor to call you back, call 911. Average ER waiting time is close to 4 hours, most pediatricians and obstetricians call back much faster than that.

    From the wording of your post, I am guessing you might be a student. If so, good luck in your career. If you are really interested in ER nursing, ask an ER nurse about a job shadow. It's a great job, and a great way to help people.

    Oh- LunahRN you are very diplomatic.

    Note to self: do not p!ss off hherrn :behindpc: :wink2: Great post.
  9. by   Ruby Vee
    Quote from fsk123

    i would say that you are not every empathetic, nor do you apply the holistic approach to nursing if you are this judgemental.
    and i'd say that if you are this toxic to your colleagues, you're going to have a rough orientation when you get out of school and take your first job. vent threads are for venting. they are not for people who have no idea what it's like to work in the er -- or even as a nurse -- to admonish er nurses for venting.
  10. by   camilalago
    This flu is preventable as nursing professionals, while maintaining proper hygiene, being cautious and making good use of education in order to avoid infection and that the population knows how to protect themselves and prevent this disease.

    We are nursing students at the University of Magallanes, Camila Lago and Claudia Snchez.

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