Possibly switching from IMC or a step-down Crit Care unit to ED

  1. I am possibly relocating to a new state and I have been a RN for one year on a IMC (Intermediate Care /step-down cricitcal care) unit. I was wondering if that is enough time to switch to the ED. I have always liked the ED and it was my last rotation in nursing school. I feel like I still have a lot to learn, so do I try and switch to the ED now since I will be relocating to a new state, or stick to an IMC floor? I already have my ACLS cert.
    Thanks!
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    About sunshine88

    Joined: Jun '08; Posts: 16; Likes: 3

    5 Comments

  3. by   PAERRN20
    Sure why not? I went into the ED straight from nursing school. You can do it. Many nurses enter the world of emergency nursing before their ink even dries on their license. You will have a bit of an edge since you already have ACLS and step-down experience.
  4. by   taz628
    What you're describing it pretty much what I just did. I spent a bit shy of a year in a step down critical care unit and jumped over to ED a few months ago. My weakest points are vents, some of the drips (mainly only worked with levo, cardene, cardizem, insulin previously), and peds. Oh dear, the kiddos are my worst... *cringes* But it's fun and I'm learning. Good luck with your switch! I've already had to use my "inpatient skills" a few times since some of the other staff have been off the floors for so long.
  5. by   Medic2RN
    Did the same thing also. Go for it!! It may help to add PALS and TNCC to your certifications too.
    If that's where you want to be, then keep applying until you hear a YES!
  6. by   r0b0tafflicti0n
    Quote from taz628
    What you're describing it pretty much what I just did. I spent a bit shy of a year in a step down critical care unit and jumped over to ED a few months ago. My weakest points are vents, some of the drips (mainly only worked with levo, cardene, cardizem, insulin previously), and peds. Oh dear, the kiddos are my worst... *cringes* But it's fun and I'm learning. Good luck with your switch! I've already had to use my "inpatient skills" a few times since some of the other staff have been off the floors for so long.

    It's interesting that you talk about the kiddos. . .are you in an area without a major Children's hospital? I'm wondering what would happen to me in that situation if I relocated, what a HUGE disadvantage/fumbling idiot I'd be with kids. . .
  7. by   JessicaSN
    It's interesting that you talk about the kiddos. . .are you in an area without a major Children's hospital? I'm wondering what would happen to me in that situation if I relocated, what a HUGE disadvantage/fumbling idiot I'd be with kids. . .
    This was directed to someone else but I have some experience with this. My hospital is right in the middle of 2 great children's hospitals (one being Cincinnati Children's) and people still bring in kids for a variety of problems. From sore throat/broken bones to vomiting and diarrhea to kid-not-breathing situations. I probably see 2-3 kids a shift and transfer about 2 kids per month to one of the children's hospitals. Last night I had a suicidal pre-teen with Leukemia. You will see it all in the ER.

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