Leaving the er after six months

  1. In short i've been a nurse for almost three years working on a MedSurg telly and doing float for all the different floors ib the hospital including geriatric PCU respiratory critical care etc. I made a switch to emergency medicine and absolutely hate it- unfortunately Rven being a nurse with experience I had to go through a residency program which entails a contract of commitment for one year -six months of training and classes.. I hate the hours and the stress of the job and want a set schedule .. My manger told me I might not have. Set schedule up to a year and so now I work all hours of the day and night- while they gave new grads first choice on hours- leaving nothing for me - even though I've been at the hospital for four years. I've recently been offered A position outpatient with 3 to 4 days a week eight hours shifts no weekends no holidays in pre admission testing and pre op. The schedule sounds like a dream -- my only question is I feel super guilty for leaving after only being in the ER six months - but having experience as a nurse I know I don't want to stay at a job I hate- especially with a sucky schedule--- What would you do if you were me and how would you approach my manager
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    About Sj3215

    Joined: Mar '14; Posts: 5; Likes: 5

    11 Comments

  3. by   amzyRN
    I would do what was best for me. If you hate the job, get the heck out of there. If you like emergency medicine then perhaps stay till you get a year and get another job somewhere else. Rotating shifts and random scheduling sucks. I had a job with random scheduling and I quit too. I actually left the ER but came back after 6 months because I was so bored at my new job. I have found that I hate boredom and routine just as much as excessive workload (which was another reason why I left my last ER). If you hate the ER though and don't see yourself staying in the specialty and you hate the schedule, why would you stay? Don't let guilt make you stay in a job. If they wanted to get rid of you, they wouldn't feel guilty about it. It's business.

    I would approach my manager in person and tell her that the random scheduling and rotating shifts are having a negative impact on your health. If she says they can fix it, consider staying. If not, tell her when your last day will be and write your letter of resignation to make it official.
  4. by   Kuriin
    If you hate it, leave. You are not contractually obligated to staying. You may be required to pay back the training; but, many hospitals don't even enforce that clause.
  5. by   Leader25
    "My manger told me I might not have. Set schedule up to a year and so now I work all hours of the day and night- while they gave new grads first choice on hours- leaving nothing for me - even though I've been at the hospital for four years. "


    Tell them take this job and shove it!!
  6. by   Leader25
    True being bored is awful too.
  7. by   delawaremalenurse
    I read this as you having a contractual obligation for one year. If so, I would be checking (discreetly) on what the repercussions would be for breaking the terms of the contract (i.e. do you owe money, "non-hire" status, termination, etc) before making any decisions.
  8. by   Sj3215
    As far as contract goes - it is for one year- there is no payment penalty anymore per HR- just a "commitment up to a year" . I'm still leaning way towards leaving- just because the outpatient job pays way more and again has much better hours- I'm just so nervous on how to address my manager - my first thought Is to contact hR again in regards to leaving and how to approach the situation after all the orientation and training I've been given
  9. by   amzyRN
    If it were me, I'd give her a doctor's note saying I can't work rotating shifts. You can say you tried it and it's making you ill. A health concern trumps a contractual obligation. I didn't know I don't tolerate full NOC shifts until I tried working nights. Come to find out they make me physically ill. Rotating shifts are worse. Some people can do it, maybe you're not one of them. That's okay, now moving forward, be up front with your manager. What's the worst that can happen. The uncomfortable feelings will be momentary and then you will feel relief for telling her, right? Then you won't be dreading it, waiting, worried. I think you owe her a face to face conversation.
  10. by   Wuzzie
    Quote from amzyRN
    If it were me, I'd give her a doctor's note saying I can't work rotating shifts. You can say you tried it and it's making you ill. A health concern trumps a contractual obligation.
    Since the OP didn't mention any actual health problems related to her schedule it is not appropriate to recommend this. We advocate for honesty and integrity on this site. However, if the rotating shifts are not working for her it's perfectly fine for her to say that. Many people, myself included, just can't do them. If she needs a set schedule and they cannot offer her one then she needs to do what's best for her.
  11. by   amzyRN
    You are correct Wuzzie, I did not read her post thoroughly and assumed the rotating shifts were causing problems. I did not mean to suggest she lie to her supervisor. Honest is always the best policy. I think a terrible schedule like she described would lead to despair, even depression which would be a health issue. But this is how my body would respond to that situation, not necessarily everyonoe.
  12. by   Sj3215
    So an update y'all - I left my current er job- and luckily my manager was very understanding! Thanks for all you're advice- I start my new pre-op job in two weeks!!
  13. by   BurnedoutICURN
    If you can handle any backlash (financial or otherwise) from your employer for leaving before the year is finished, I would leave. If I had the opportunity to take a 3 to 4 day a week/no weekends or holidays job, the ink on my 2 week notice would be drying as I handed it to my manager.

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