EMS abuse: The Ride to get High - page 3

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  1. by   getoverit
    Attending focus groups and joining committees.....sounds like paralysis by analysis. On a national level there really isn't any effective EMS lobby.
    You can say "don't whine" or any other catchy phrase you want to...I'm not whining and I've brought positive ideas to the table for almost 20 years....where's the forum to truly be heard? Answer that.
  2. by   mwboswell
    Quote from getoverit
    Attending focus groups and joining committees.....sounds like paralysis by analysis. On a national level there really isn't any effective EMS lobby.
    You can say "don't whine" or any other catchy phrase you want to...I'm not whining and I've brought positive ideas to the table for almost 20 years....where's the forum to truly be heard? Answer that.
    so admittedly you aren't "involved anymore" eh?
    -shame.

    (see my point #11, in specific response to your statement about a national ems lobby)

    Personal recommendations
    1) Start local: engage with your employer on QA/QI processes
    2) Participate in local politics, even at a local/county level you can have an influence on the legislative/power structure for most EMS providers
    3) Lobby your elected officials - get them to know you by name becaue you speak up so often
    4) Find out what the REAL issues are regarding EMS abuse (reimbursement, social situations, homelessness, health care access, drug/alcohol substance issues, uninformed EMS administration/supervisors, underprepared EMS providers, lack of critical thinking skills.....etc, ad nauseum)
    4a) Pick ONE issue and become a champion for it. Better to do ONE thing well, to the best of your ability and make it....er, OWN IT, as your personal cause. Find new and inventive ways to pursue this - get known as the "________ EMS guy"....
    5) Expand your networks, get to know your county council, your EMS administration etc. Make it a point to meet with them a few times a year and discuss your concerns.
    6) Work to influence change at the educational side of things: work with your jr College or EMS training agency and work with the program directors/faculty to bring about change at the ENTRY level.
    7) ensure that you are participating beyond the "Free magazine" of your professional organization (NREMT, NAEMT etc etc)...actually ENAGAGE rather than be passive.
    8) Write articles, blogs, web posts, facebook etc.....
    9) Check at your state level to see what involvement (non-elected) you can do....for example in my state, our EMS regulatory commission (that repots to the state congress) has an EMS advisory board - I got a seat on that to participate and bring items to the table and vote on items that are being prepared to present as legislation.
    10) Give presenations at conferences, seminars etc; start building "face time" with your audience.
    11) Until there is a national scope of practice or standard of EMS care and education - you will be hard pressed to find a national avenue for influence of change/lobbying efforts; EMS efforts need to start locally/regionally as this is where the base structure of EMS begins.

    I can probably think of others, but you get the point.
    Bottom line is that you can quit and "disengage" if you want - but that's the individual's personal choice. If someone has lost avenues to get involved that just means new avenues need to be CREATED.

    I'll close with one more example - if you are familiar with Bryan Bledsoe, he is the example to me. Whether you agree with his stances on certain topics does not matter. The facts are, he saw avenues for change and questioned the establishment on many topics. Rather than running around shooting off his mouth, he did research before forming his opinions and presenting them. Whether his opinions are right or wrong doesn't matter - the fact is that he can cite reference, resources and original studies to back his positions which makes them solid and to a degree, undeniable.

    Yes, I'm sure he didn't start in year #1 with being the keynote presenter at a EMS today conference; no, I'm sure he started small, locally and regionally. But sticking with it he did and indeed it is reaping rewards today. He has been involved in many aspects of policy and legislative review/development at local, regional, state and national levels; it's not even funny.

    But that's what it takes:
    1) Dedication: to continue against the odds
    2) Re-focus: on new avenues when you find the others aren't working
    3) Network building: the more you engage the establishment, the more you become a part of the power/influence structure and thus to be an agent of change
    4) Believe in yourself: you have a message and a vision of the way things should be - this is your motiviation. because for everyone one of "you" that gets/continues to be involved, there are THOUSANDS who stand on the sidelines and never move to the next level.
  3. by   getoverit
    I don't think I admitted to not being involved. I work at the fire department as a paramedic in addition to ICU RN, I have taught at the community college for EMS curriculum for over 12 years, been published many times in nationally distributed journals, been a supervisor, flight team, etc.....so much for my qualifications.
    Maybe you've picked me for some reason to exchange words, but your responses to me are like you're talking to someone without any experience and someone who isn't aware of the options you described. They're all good ideas and like I said, they sound good on paper. In some areas, some or maybe even close to all these things can work...but not everywhere. I'm not trying to continue some argument with you, your points are theoretically sound but practically implausible.
    I also precept people (both at the FD and ICU), that way I can influence people at the entry level...I've been doing that for 15 years so I think I've made an indelible mark on the profession at a local and regional level. And I don't rest on my laurels, I continue to work at it everyday and I resent your insinuation that I don't.
  4. by   mwboswell
    My last post was supposed to be universal and not at anyone in particular. From the sound of your post 12/11 - it sounded like you had backed out of being "involved". My bad if I misunderstood.
  5. by   getoverit
    No problem. When you quoted me I didn't realize it was a universal post and thought it was a direct response.

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