Jump to content

Elderly patient left on bedpan for days

News   (25,521 Views 96 Comments)
by rachelgeorgina rachelgeorgina (New Member) New Member

rachelgeorgina specializes in ..

6,329 Visitors; 412 Posts

advertisement

You are reading page 3 of Elderly patient left on bedpan for days. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

1,450 Visitors; 29 Posts

This is sickening to know that any human is treated in such a way.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

4,212 Visitors; 228 Posts

I've seen some upsetting things (and filed my share of reports) working in a nursing home, but for the life of me I cannot even imagine how this would happen.

Three shifts a day and NONE of the aides doing ADLs ever looked under this man? Additionally, a bedpan left under someone developing sores is going smell extremely bad after a relatively short time. None of the nurses thought to take a peek?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

TrishJK specializes in elder care; psych.

1 Article; 6,358 Visitors; 122 Posts

It'sa beatup.

I do na believe't.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

fuzzywuzzy has 3 years experience and specializes in cna in ltc.

16,923 Visitors; 1,816 Posts

This reminds me of how my friends and I were talking about aging and I said we had a resident who fell and broke her hip and then laid on the floor for 2 days before anyone found her. They were appalled that I worked in such a place that would allow this to happen. I had to explain that the fall happened AT HOME, and that is why she was in LTC to begin with.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

hiddencatRN specializes in ..

29,076 Visitors; 3,408 Posts

This reminds me of how my friends and I were talking about aging and I said we had a resident who fell and broke her hip and then laid on the floor for 2 days before anyone found her. They were appalled that I worked in such a place that would allow this to happen. I had to explain that the fall happened AT HOME, and that is why she was in LTC to begin with.

:( That's awful. My granddaddy fell and was on the floor 10 hours and that seemed like a horribly long time. He should have been in LTC well before that point, but he had one of those medical alert systems installed (incorrectly) that didn't work when he needed it. He had nerve damage in one of his arms from lying on it all night.

He got very good care at the nursing home and hospice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

2,543 Visitors; 85 Posts

:no: Absolutely horrible ! I don't care what country this happened in...patient care is of the utmost importance. PERIOD!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1,391 Visitors; 14 Posts

Everyone (nurses and cnas) who worked on that floor (all shifts) should be FIRED! No excuses! No exceptions!

They should have their license/certification taken away from them. They don't deserve it.

5 days!!! This is totally totally unacceptable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

rachelgeorgina specializes in ..

6,329 Visitors; 412 Posts

I'm from Sydney, Australia and the incident occurred in a major acute care hospital with a brilliant record for trauma care, including a nationally recognised burns unit.

It's my understanding that the patient in question was in ICU for a number of days before being transfered to CCU (where it is alleged the incident occurred) and was discovered when he was moved to the respiratory ward.

I can't comment on the number of days, suffice to say that the hospital has now said that the incident DID happen but that 5 days is an exaggeration (after originally denying the incident occurred at all.) I can comment and say that other students that I was working with during that week were on the respiratory ward that he was transfered to and SAW the pressure wounds with their own eyes. Hole at the bottom of his spine big enough for fists is apparently an accurate description.

To those that have said everyone in hospital should be fired or that the hospital should be closed down, I can understand where you're coming from. However, how logistical is it to close down a major hospital (including it's OR services, trauma services, investigative and outpatient services as well as the basic ward care, pathology, imaging, the blood bank etc?) This place is HUGE and provides care to thousands of people on a daily basis!

Those who have commented on the role of nursing aids in this situation - they are rarely employed in the acute care setting in the way Americans are used to. It is the RNs duty to toilet, turn, bath and change their patients sheets, along with the rest of her duties. We, for the most part, don't have aids to delegate to!

On a final note, the story goes that the incident occurred in CCU. I have a lot of personal experience with this particular CCU as my great auntie was a patient there twice in four months for extended periods of time before being transfered to ICU and passing away a day later. This level of care, described in the article, I would NOT put past some of the staff (most of the staff) on this unit. My aunt had no teeth - they sent up full meals (not puree) which she couldn't eat. My aunt required feeding due to massive SOB and general exhaustion. She was never fed by staff unless I or my family were there and WE did it. Family members were often ignored by staff when changes in our aunt's condition were pointed out (increased drowsiness and confusion, which on a known CO2 retainer is obviously a sign of CO2 overload, which also caused her death) and we were often treated very disrespectfully by staff for simply being there with her as loving, supportive family members. (We certainly did not behave in the way "those" annoying family members have been described to do. We simply kept her company because she was frightened, and because we realised that she was not receiving optimum care.)

& to everyone who has experienced something tragic as a result of staff negligence, I am truly sorry.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

655 Visitors; 8 Posts

This is disgusting...it's just...out of human standards...I hope whoever was responsible for this will pay.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

love-d-OR has 3 years experience and specializes in Transplant/Surgical ICU.

9,530 Visitors; 542 Posts

I agree with one of the posters. Every nurse and aide that care for that patient should be fired or at least suspended. Do they mean to tell me that when they assessed this patient they did not notice the pan under him? When they turned him they did not see the pan? When they did am/pm care they did not see it? What happened to early mobility? Was this man ever put on a chair? ROM? There where many opportunitites for that pan to be discovered, but apparently the nurses and aides preferred sitting on their nice cushions (that have no ulcers!) pretending to be working. If they charted that all of the above intereventions where done, then they really should watch their backs because a nice law suit is coming their way.

Its unfortunate that these horror stories are not from a movie script because it really puts health care workers and the system as a whole in a very bad light.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Scrubby has 6 years experience and specializes in Operating Room Nursing.

11,500 Visitors; 1,313 Posts

A very sad story, sounds like this man is going to be in and out of the OR having debridements etc.

For all those who say all the nurses should be fired, this doesn't tend to happen in Australia as we have different workplace legislation than the US. Overall I feel is a good thing, given the stories I've heard here on allnurses about US nursing being fired over making a single drug error, management not liking them etc. In fact in the public sector it is quite hard to fire a nurse.

This incident will most probably result in the all nurses involved as well as hospital and state wide being given education on the need to assess patients, to ensure that patients receive pressure area care, the need for interpreter services etc, as well as investigating what other issues may have contributed to this incident such as staffing and patient acuity levels etc.

You may disagree but I strongly feel that an educational approach to this issue is better than a knee jerk reaction of firing people.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Chazd18RN specializes in 1 yr step down unit, 2 yrs mother/baby.

1,058 Visitors; 12 Posts

I cannot believe that this happened! The article stated that he was probably not turned, nor had his bed sheets been changed, but what about assessments!! Nurses are required to assess their patients each and every shift. Every single nurse that took care of that poor man should be fired because they all probably charted that he was assessed when in fact he was not, otherwise someone would have discovered the bedpan atleast by the next shift. I know that I am not a perfect nurse, but at the very least I always check my patients thoroughly. This story really makes me angry.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
  • Recently Browsing 0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×