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by rapids123 rapids123 (New Member) New Member

rapids123 has 1 years experience .

210 Visitors; 2 Posts

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Hi! So I just recently got into the Accelerated BSN Program at Marian University. I majored in Human Biology as an undergrad. I want to become a DNP but not sure how to. I want to apply to schools right after I am done with the ABSN program so I dont waste any more time. I will graduate April 2020. I worked as a CNA during undergrad and have 500 hours. My questions are:

1. What is the difference between FNP and DNP? With the FNP, do you still get the doctorate degree/title?

2. Are there any DNP programs that I can get into without any PAID clinical experience (obviously I will get the unpaid experience during my program)

3. What is the first step i need to take after I graduate from the ABSN program?

4. When do I start applying for DNP?

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4 Likes; 245 Visitors; 21 Posts

1. DNP is a degree, like the BSN or MSN. Specifically, the DNP is a practice doctorate. Many BSN to DNP programs allow specialization as an advanced practice nurse. A DNP program that offers a FNP track would prepare you to be a family nurse practitioner.

2. There are very likely programs that you can find that would accept you without any clinical experience. Unfortunately, not all nursing graduate programs have high standards of entry. However, I would strongly encourage you to consider some clinical practice as a nurse before pursuing graduate education. You will find that your experiences as a nurse will form a foundation upon which to develop as an NP. Also, most DNP programs require some type of capstone project. It will likely be challenging to create a project if you have no idea about the world of nursing. Graduate school is time consuming and expensive and you will want clinical experience to ensure that you are making the right decision.

3. Again, I would strongly encourage you to obtain a job as a nurse. You might be able to find a position working weekends, which allows you to work and go to school. This option might also allow you to pay out-of-pocket for your degree.

4. You will probably have to contact the school that interests you to get more information on the application process and timeline. If it is a reputable program, I would not be surprised if they will not look at an application for someone that has not graduated with their BSN, passed the NCLEX, and is licensed to practice nursing.

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NICUmiiki has 3 years experience as a BSN, RN and works as a NICU RN.

112 Likes; 24,731 Visitors; 1,727 Posts

My own answer copied from another post:

I'm a DNP student at a big state university. I prefer to knock it out all at once. 1 extra year now vs. 2 or more later. I really don't want to do school again after this.

Educational degrees: DNP & MSN. Either can prepare you to be a nurse practitioner or other roles.

DNP is a practice doctorate that includes translational research (not new knowledge like a PhD). The nurse practitioner courses are the same as MSN. It's the core courses and the research project that is different. It should take 3 years full-time including summers or 4 years without summers (per the Essentials of DNP). This degree is being pushed as the entry to practice similar to the Doctor of Physical Therapy or the Doctor of Audiology who get practice doctorates with less clinical hours than most MSN programs. The idea is that for NPs to truly gain independence, they have to be prepared to add to our knowledge vs. following what others are telling us is best practice.

MSN is a master's degree. It has been the standard for a long time. It obviously should take less time. Like I said, the nurse practitioner content is the same. It's more common right now, but the number of DNP programs are steadily rising. Some schools are phasing it out. If you get an MSN degree, you'll most likely always be grandfathered in if the DNP actually becomes the standard, but you may have a harder time competing with DNPs (like BSN vs. ASN).

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APRN - Advanced practice registered nurse. An RN who has completed graduate education (MSN or DNP) to practice in the four APRN roles: nurse practitioner (NP), certified nurse midwife (CNM), certified registered nurse anesthetist (CRNA), or clinical nurse specialist (CNS).

An NP is a APRN who can either have an MSN or DNP.

Edited by Miiki

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NICUmiiki has 3 years experience as a BSN, RN and works as a NICU RN.

112 Likes; 24,731 Visitors; 1,727 Posts

Another of my answers copied from another post:

I will use the term APRN because that is what my state uses and what the consensus model recommends. ARNP is still used by a few states.

APRN - Advanced practice registered nurse. An RN who has completed graduate education (MSN or DNP) to practice in one of the four APRN roles: nurse practitioner (NP), certified nurse midwife (CNM), certified registered nurse anesthetist (CRNA), or clinical nurse specialist (CNS).

A nurse practioner is a type of APRN. There are quite a few specialties. Think of them like medical residencies. Yes, you have to choose before you start. There is a good bit of overlap but none can do everything that any of the other can. It's becoming more and more common for NPs to be dual ceritified to expand their scope of practice (FNP/PMHNP, FNP/AGNP-AC -> emergency, PNP-PC/PNP-AC)

The most common is FNP - trained in PRIMARY CARE of people across the lifespan. This includes uncomplicated maternity care, but not delivery. FNPs are not generalists and aren't trained for acute care. States following the consensus model do not allow them to work in acute care settings.

WHNP (Women's Health) - primary care of women across the lifespan. More emphasis on OBGYN than FNP (Only CNMs deliver babies)

AGNP-PC (Adult/Gerontology-Primary Care) Emphasis on primary care from about 13 yo to old age.

PNP-PC (Pediatric Primary Care) Primary care from birth to about 21 yo. (Why would you choose this instead of FNP? Pediatricians around me are hiring PNPs more often because they do all of their clinicals in peds instead of just 1 semester.)

AGNP-AC (Adult/Geri Acute Care) - Acute care of adults. May work in hospital or specialty clinics

PNP-AC (Pediatric Acute Care) Acute care of children

NNP (Neonatal) Acute and primary care of infants up to 2 years old. Most NNPs work in NICUs with premature and critically sick infants. (Obviously the best specialty ;))

PMHNP (Psychiatric Mental Health) - psych and mental health care across the lifespan

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Spadeforce has 1 years experience.

46 Likes; 1,613 Visitors; 191 Posts

Do you know what these roles entail or just catch wiff of a possible six figure salary and decide to hop ship without any second thought?

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4,006 Visitors; 141 Posts

Good luck to you!    I think it is common for  nursing students to consider their clinical experience "unpaid RN" work. But to be honest, it's not even close.   You have the patient's RN and your instructor watching over you like a hawk and typically you are taking on very little of the typical RN load and responsibility. 

I would highly recommend getting experience as a registered nurse.   Typically you can work part time during most FNP programs.  Good luck!

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