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Drowning on the floor...only 2 months in. HELP!

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by NewKidOnTheFloor NewKidOnTheFloor (New Member) New Member

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You are reading page 3 of Drowning on the floor...only 2 months in. HELP!. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

TriciaJ has 35 years experience as a RN and works as a Retired.

1,109 Likes; 5 Followers; 30,817 Visitors; 2,770 Posts

My floor is like that as well usually 1:8-1:10. Med surg/Tele. Mostly with 1 or no aid. The pts are very sick too. Very unsafe. But we have no choice, we can't say no, the hospital said it is abandonment if we do not accept the pts that are admitted to the floor.

Hospitals love to use the word "abandonment" to whip recalcitrant nurses into shape. The OP's coworkers may be "superfast" but I'm betting there are corners being cut. That only works as long as it works, then everything hits the fan. As others have stated, it will then be the nurse hung out to dry.

If something bad happens, you cannot use unsafe ratios as a defense. The next question will be: "To whom did you report the unsafe ratios?" It's the pits that OP is the new kid in a facility where everyone else has accepted being abused. Doesn't give her much of a leg to stand on to speak out. I'd seriously start looking for the exits.

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tilelene has 10 years experience.

1,156 Visitors; 14 Posts

Consider looking for a nurse residency program so that you can learn new nursing skills in a controlled, nurturing, learning environment. I'm sure you are not gaining meaningful experiences because you are running like a chicken with no head. Focus that fearful energy into looking for another job opportunity. When you do look for another job, do your research on the facility to make sure that they have a real orientation program. Now that you have experienced a bad orientation, you are in a good position to ask the appropriate questions on what you should be gaining in experience as a new nurse. Good Luck! You got this!

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140 Likes; 569 Visitors; 204 Posts

Hospitals love to use the word "abandonment" to whip recalcitrant nurses into shape. The OP's coworkers may be "superfast" but I'm betting there are corners being cut. That only works as long as it works, then everything hits the fan. As others have stated, it will then be the nurse hung out to dry.

If something bad happens, you cannot use unsafe ratios as a defense. The next question will be: "To whom did you report the unsafe ratios?" It's the pits that OP is the new kid in a facility where everyone else has accepted being abused. Doesn't give her much of a leg to stand on to speak out. I'd seriously start looking for the exits.

I agree. Also, in CA anyway, the definition of patient abandonment is written out on our board's website. I have heard admin throw the term around not knowing what it really means.

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Ruby Vee has 40 years experience as a BSN.

941 Likes; 11 Followers; 64 Articles; 168,844 Visitors; 13,727 Posts

Hello there! I finished my BSN in May 2016 and was unable to find a job until 2 months ago. I started in a med/surg floor. The patient ratio is usually around 1:10 and all I got where 10 days of orientation on the floor(9 of which were spent as a CNA because they were short staffed). So after my one day with an RN, I was let go to do it all myself. I was so scared, but decided my best ally would be a good attitude and willingness to learn. Quitting is not an option. I love this job too much. But after 2 months, I can't sleep (without dreaming about being in the hospital) my stress levels have affected my health, I barely eat and I just feel like a total failure. I struggle to keep up with the workload, I feel horrible asking so many questions (I want my patients to be safe) I worry I can't handle this, and find myself wondering what have I done by becoming a nurse. This feeling fades when I get to make a difference. But as a new nurse, I feel more like a burden. I'm 37 and have never felt so incompetent in my life. Will this ever go away?

It sounds pretty much like what we used to call "reality shock." Most new grads go through it, but the good news is that it DOES go away. It takes about a year to feel comfortable in a new job, and the transition from nursing student to nurse is a HUGE one. I'm glad to hear you say that quitting is not an option. Hang in there, it will get better. Please let us know how things are going.

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5 Likes; 1,164 Visitors; 135 Posts

Run, don't walk, away from dangerous situations. It's your license on the line when something bad happens. I was in a situation like you before as I had 48 patients as a new grad LVN in a nursing home. It was pure hell and I hated it so bad. I left and life has been amazing ever since. There are great jobs out there. Don't settle and don't be the fall girl/guy because administration is being cheap and won't adequately staff the place.

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5 Likes; 1,164 Visitors; 135 Posts

Med surg units are packed with patients with one foot in the ICU already. 10 to 1 is a joke. You will burn yourself out like I did.

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5 Likes; 1,164 Visitors; 135 Posts

Hi! That is the regular ratio. My coworkers are just very fast with their rounds. They have been doing it for years now.

From my experience as a student in med surg, the staff RN's that were "fast" were the ones thst skipped doing vital signs and did rushed inadequate assessments. Stethoscope on the chest and back for 3 seconds each type of assessments. I was not impressed nor was our nursing instructor who would hear this over and over again. They are fast because they are skipping vital steps. The patients deserve so much better.

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NurseCard has 13 years experience as a ADN and works as a RN.

140 Likes; 3 Followers; 2 Articles; 34,924 Visitors; 2,844 Posts

Hi! That is the regular ratio. My coworkers are just very fast with their rounds. They have been doing it for years now.

Mmm hmm. Doesn't mean that they are practicing safe nursing. They are cutting a

LOT of corners. If you are taking care of 10, true Med Surge patients all by

yourself, that is not safe.

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227 Visitors; 28 Posts

Sounds like a bad hospital. When i graduated I got training for like 16 weeks. First job was in tele/step down. Lots of ongoing training and support. They had a resource nurse also available to help if something needed. Do you work day or nights?. Sometimes helpful to work nights when the loads is so heavy. I would aim at staying there for 6 months and then looking for something else. Very hard to get a job without some experience.

For now. Take your time . Safety first . Assess all your patients first in Then morning. Them meds. This is very important. Quite a few times I inherited patients from night shift who were in distress and no one knew overnight. Patients that needed code rescues and ICU transfer. And again this was a top notch hospital. Best of luck. Assess, report abn values, give meds, chart..

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227 Visitors; 28 Posts

What state do you live in? Sometimes is worth to get and go someone nurses are treated better. You must be someone where oversaturated that it took that log to find a job . Terrible.

I was in South Florida . Florida just sucked too many nurses makes it very competitive. . So generally jobs are harder to get . Pay not so great. Cost of living still high. And your forced too ake watever.

I left bedside 2 years after and worked for hospice admissions that was great but hard to get without lots of experience. I then went for advanced practice and worked hard to network to ensure I got a job right out of school . But many class mates waited forever for first crappy paying high demanding job. Some left the state. I left this year and it's much better elsewhere. Less work, more flexibility and way more pay

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12 Visitors; 2 Posts

1:10 sounds insane.

I work nights currently, so our ratios can get high with admissions but I haven't had a higher ratio than 1:7 thus far, knock on wood.

If it were me personally, I would be looking for something else.

I am a newer nurse as well, so my time management is not where I want it to be yet, but I could never handle 10 acute patients at once.

The nights where I end up with 1:7 I still feel like I'm drowning.

Tbh 1:10 would make me sad. Who would want their family member in a place where the nurse has 10 patients?

I know it is out of your control. But you do have control over applying elsewhere.

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265 Visitors; 7 Posts

I'm new too and I often drown with 4 patients, which is our max. I would've quit after a few weeks of 10 patients. That's absolutely insane.

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