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Does this sound feasible?

NP Students   (1,319 Views | 12 Replies)
by lpnbutterfly lpnbutterfly (New) New

479 Profile Views; 5 Posts

I have my LPN license and currently work as a school nurse. I love this job. I want to further my career. I've gone back and forth between NP and PA. What I'm planning to do is go back to school and get my B.A.S in biomedical science. After that, I can either apply to PA school or go back and do the LPN to RN transition and then go for my MSN. I'm leaning toward NP. I love nursing. Does this sound like something that can be done? I've read so many posts about "unusual" ways to get to a MSN. I've seen so many of the ideas shot down. Does this idea sound like it would work? The reason for doing it this way, is because I already have an AA and a certificate program (my LPN). Financial aid will not pay for the transition program to RN and all the pre-reqs that are required. However, going for a bachelor's degree in biomedical science will cover just about all the pre-reqs and will qualify for financial aid. Plus, it adds some good classes to my academic experience as well. As long as my GPA is where it needs to be, does this sound like a decent plan? My current gpa is a 3.2. I'm in Florida, if that matters. Thanks in advance for your input. It's appreciated!

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applesxoranges is a BSN, RN and specializes in ER.

2,240 Posts; 15,480 Profile Views

It sounds... weird. I strongly recommend skipping the bachelors of science and getting the transition classes. I do not see why they will not pay for an LPN to RN program but they will pay for another bachelor degree? You may need to fill out a form with a degree plan in order to be eligible for financial aid but it wasn't that hard. If you want to go PA, then your proposed route is fine. However, if you feel like you want NP, then I would recommend finding a way to get an ADN or an accelerated BSN (some will take you if you have enough credits without a degree).

With the ADN, you can either do an RN to BSN which is usually under 10,000 or go for an RN to MSN. There are a lot of RN to MSN NP programs out there.

I do not see how getting a bachelors in a field not related to nursing will suddenly open up financial aid or money to go back to get your RN license. It seems like it is adding a ton of debt. I don't know of any programs that will accept a LPN license instead of an RN license except the direct entry NP programs (which require no license) and those are really, really tough to get in.

It seems quicker, easier, and cheaper to find an LPN to RN program. Shop around. Talk to financial aid advisers in person and tell them your issues (my financial aid advisers did not bat an eye when I told them that I needed to fill out a degree plan when I told them my major). Look into getting hired at a hospital (you may need to do a tech or unit clerk position that doesn't use your license) and use their tuition reimbursement.

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littlepeopleRNICU has 7 years experience and specializes in NICU, telemetry.

476 Posts; 8,682 Profile Views

I think you should make a decision now. If you do BAS, LPN-BSN, then an MSN, that is way too many stepping stones...as well as a lot of time and money. Make a decision now and go from there!

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5 Posts; 479 Profile Views

I think there is some confusion. I do not already have an Bachelor's degree. I do, however, already have an AA. To transition to the RN program would be essentially getting another Associate's degree (you graduate with ADN). Since I already have one AA, financial aid will not pay for a second Associate's degree. It will, however, pay for me to further my education with a bachelor's degree. Since I am not an RN, I can get my Bachelor's in biomedical science (which is essentially a pre-med undergrad degree). By doing that, it would cover any pre-reqs I might need to transition from LPN to RN. Once I get my RN, I will already have a bachelor's and could then go for my MSN degree...or go to PA school. Does this clear it up?

ETA - it wouldn't necessarily "free up" money for me to get my RN but I could get all my pre-reqs covered under the Bachelor's degree. so that when I go back to transition to RN I only have to pay for the nursing classes out of pocket and not several pre-reqs as well.

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CaringGerinurse525 has 2 years experience.

117 Posts; 2,940 Profile Views

That sounds complicated and a waste. Can't you do an Lpn to rn bachelor degree?

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9 Posts; 809 Profile Views

I would check and see if financial aid will pay for an LPN to BSN program. I know they have programs out there for it because I too was an LPN first and I almost took the LPN to BSN route. Indiana State has an online format I believe. If you don't do it this way, you are looking at a lot of extra time in school. If you can't do an LPN to BSN program then I would stick with the biomedical science degree and gear it towards going to PA school. Additionally, if financial aid wont pay for RN classes now would it pay for them after ypur biomedical degree? A pre-req for NP school is that you are an RN. So regardless if you take the RN classes now or later I think youll still run into that problem. I think those are the most efficient ways to go about it. I hope all works out!!

Edited by Ashley_113

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applesxoranges is a BSN, RN and specializes in ER.

2,240 Posts; 15,480 Profile Views

I would look at getting into an LPN to BSN program. There are out there although some are at private colleges (but not diploma mills). We have one near me. I would avoid the Excelsior LPN to RN program though but there are other programs out there and one surely is close to you in an acceptable distance.

Getting the bachelor degree is kind of crazy in my opinion. I would see about going a traditional bachelors to be honest. It just seems like an unnecessary expense.

Getting the bachelor degree in the other field doesn't solve the issue of cost. It would be great if you managed to get into PA school but that is also tough and very competitive as a lot of students who do not get into med school go the PA route. After you get your bachelors of science, you still need to find the funds for getting the nursing education and it probably wouldn't shorten the time frame any since you'll be in clinical classes and most nursing programs do not let you take multiple clinical classes at the same time.

I was able to take a few classes at the same time but I had to sign a huge waiver that basically said not to do what I did (worked about 40 hours a week when it said it was not recommend to work more than 10 hours a week and take the two classes at the same time) with three different administrators. Most programs build off of classes like the LPN program so you will be doing at least a year if not two of clinicals.

It sounds great on paper but it is a huge detour and it is expensive. Basically, it comes across as someone potentially becoming a career student. You will also rack up a lot of debt.

And the transition classes would be another degree anyway which would mean the financial aid won't pay for them.

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34 Posts; 1,424 Profile Views

Oh boy, it all just sounds so complicated. Are you going to be going full time or part time? This matters because if you do part time, you will get your BSN in 3 years, then your MSN in another 3. Thats 6 years of school and debt. If you go full time, you will finish your BSN in 1.5 years and the same for your MSN. so, with that said, it all depends if youre gonna be full time or not. PA school is 2 years. if you can only be part time, I would go for the PA route. good luck.

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applesxoranges is a BSN, RN and specializes in ER.

2,240 Posts; 15,480 Profile Views

Well, they are proposing getting a bachelors in a field that is basically "pre-med" and then trying to do a LPN to RN program. Then trying to get into a MSN program.

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littlepeopleRNICU has 7 years experience and specializes in NICU, telemetry.

476 Posts; 8,682 Profile Views

I think there is some confusion. I do not already have an Bachelor's degree. I do, however, already have an AA. To transition to the RN program would be essentially getting another Associate's degree (you graduate with ADN). Since I already have one AA, financial aid will not pay for a second Associate's degree. It will, however, pay for me to further my education with a bachelor's degree. Since I am not an RN, I can get my Bachelor's in biomedical science (which is essentially a pre-med undergrad degree). By doing that, it would cover any pre-reqs I might need to transition from LPN to RN. Once I get my RN, I will already have a bachelor's and could then go for my MSN degree...or go to PA school. Does this clear it up?

ETA - it wouldn't necessarily "free up" money for me to get my RN but I could get all my pre-reqs covered under the Bachelor's degree. so that when I go back to transition to RN I only have to pay for the nursing classes out of pocket and not several pre-reqs as well.

No, we understand. Or at least I do, and I think from the others' posts, they do too. What we're saying is, why GET a bachelor's in a completely unrelated field and then continue on in nursing? It's a waste of time, money, and your sanity. If you know you want to be an NP vs PA, then forgo the BAS altogether. Since you say you think NP rather, just get a BSN if you're wanting a Bachelor's.

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